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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Mitochondrial function/dysfunction in white adipose tissue.
Exp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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The role of mitochondria in white adipocytes has long been neglected due in part to their lower abundance in these cells. However, accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondria are vital for maintaining metabolic homeostasis in white adipocytes because of their involvement in adipogenesis, fatty acid synthesis and esterification, branched-chain amino acid catabolism and lipolysis. It is therefore not surprising that white adipose tissue function can be perturbed by altering mitochondrial components or oxidative capacity. Moreover, studies in humans and animals with significantly altered fat mass, such as in obesity or lipoatrophy, indicate that impaired mitochondrial function in adipocytes may be linked directly to the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes and insulin resistance. However, recent studies that specifically targeted mitochondrial function in adipocytes indicated dissociation between impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity and systemic insulin sensitivity.
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Metabolically active human brown adipose tissue derived stem cells.
Stem Cells
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in the evolutionarily conserved mechanisms underlying energy homeostasis in mammals. It is characterized by fat vacuoles 5-10 µm in diameter and expression of uncoupling protein one, central to the regulation of thermogenesis. In the human newborn, BAT depots are typically grouped around the vasculature and solid organs. These depots maintain body temperature during cold exposure by warming the blood before its distribution to the periphery. They also ensure an optimal temperature for biochemical reactions within solid organs. BAT had been thought to involute throughout childhood and adolescence. Recent studies, however, have confirmed the presence of active BAT in adult humans with depots residing in cervical, supraclavicular, mediastinal, paravertebral, and suprarenal regions. While human pluripotent stem cells have been differentiated into functional brown adipocytes in vitro and brown adipocyte progenitor cells have been identified in murine skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue, multipotent metabolically active BAT-derived stem cells from a single depot have not been identified in adult humans to date. Here, we demonstrate a clonogenic population of metabolically active BAT stem cells residing in adult humans that can: (a) be expanded in vitro; (b) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential; and (c) functionally differentiate into metabolically active brown adipocytes. Our study defines a new target stem cell population that can be activated to restore energy homeostasis in vivo for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.
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A long journey to effective obesity treatments: is there light at the end of the tunnel?
Exp. Biol. Med. (Maywood)
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2013
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As the obesity epidemic continues, more Americans are getting fatter, having more weight-related problems such as cardiovascular disease, and are experiencing new metabolic dysfunctions. For over 50 years, the adipose tissue (AT), commonly referred to as fat, has been of interest to academic and clinical scientists, public health officials and individuals interested in body composition and image including much of the average public, athletes, parents, etc. On one hand, efforts to alter body shape, weight and body fat percentage still include bizarre and scientifically unfounded methods. On the other hand, significant new scientific strides have been made in understanding the growth, function and regulation of anatomical and systemic AT. Markers of transition/conversion of precursor cells that mature to form lipid assimilating adipocytes have been identified. Molecular master regulators such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins were uncovered and regulatory mechanisms behind variables of adiposity defined and refined. Interventions including pharmaceutical compounds, surgical, psychosocial interventions have also been tested. Has all of the preceding research helped alleviate the adverse physiologies of overweight and/or obese people? Does research to date point to new modalities that should be the focus of efforts to rid the world of obesity-related problems in the 21st century? This review provides a general overview of scientific efforts to date and a provocative view of the future for adiposity.
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Insulin suppresses ischemic preconditioning-mediated cardioprotection through Akt-dependent mechanisms.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2013
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It is believed that the diabetic myocardium is refractory to cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC) mainly because of impaired insulin signaling to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt). However, human as well as animal studies have clearly showed that the hearts of type 2 diabetic humans and animals may exhibit increased signaling through PI3K-Akt but yet are resistant to cardioprotection by IPC or ischemic post-conditioning. Therefore, this study was designed to determine whether activation of insulin signaling prior to IPC is detrimental for cardioprotection and to assess the role of insulin receptors (IRs) and Akt in mediating this effect. Wild-type (WT) hearts, hearts lacking IRs or hearts expressing an active form of Akt (myrAkt1) were perfused ex vivo using a Langendorff preparation and were subjected to IPC (3cycles of 5min ischemia followed by 5min reflow before 30min no flow ischemia and then by 45min reperfusion) in the presence or absence of 1nmol/L insulin. Interestingly, whereas insulin was protective against I/R (30min no flow ischemia and 45min reperfusion), it completely abolished cardioprotection by IPC in WT hearts but not in mice lacking insulin receptors (IRs) in cardiomyocytes (CIRKO) or in all cardiac cells (TIRKO). The suppression of IPC-mediated cardioprotection was mediated through downstream signaling to Akt and Gsk3?. In addition, transgenic induction of Akt in the heart was sufficient to abrogate IPC even when insulin was absent, further confirming the involvement of Akt in insulins suppression of cardioprotection by IPC. These data provide evidence that excessive insulin signaling to Akt is detrimental for cardioprotection by IPC and could explain the failure of the diabetic myocardium to precondition.
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Cardiac aging and insulin resistance: could insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling be used as a therapeutic target?
Curr. Pharm. Des.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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Intrinsic cardiac aging is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with structural and functional changes that impede cardiac responses to stress and to cardio-protective mechanisms. Although systemic insulin resistance and the associated risk factors exacerbate cardiac aging, cardiac-specific insulin resistance without confounding systemic alterations, could prevent cardiac aging. Thus, strategies aimed to reduce insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in the heart prevent cardiac aging in lower organisms and in mammals but the mechanisms underlying this protection are not fully understood. In this review, we describe the impact of aging on the cardiovascular system and discuss the mounting evidence that reduced insulin/IGF signaling in the heart could alleviate age-associated alterations and preserve cardiac performance.
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Cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress in the metabolic syndrome: an update on antioxidant therapies.
Curr. Pharm. Des.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2013
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The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors including obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, elevated blood pressure and glucose intolerance. The MetS increases the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes. Each component of the MetS causes cardiac dysfunction and their combination carries additional risk. The mechanisms underlying cardiac dysfunction in the MetS are complex and might include lipid accumulation, increased fibrosis and stiffness, altered calcium homeostasis, abnormal autophagy, altered substrate utilization, mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. Mitochondrial and extra-mitochondrial sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced antioxidant defense mechanisms characterize the myocardium of humans and animals with the MetS. The mechanisms for increased cardiac oxidative stress in the MetS are not fully understood but include increased fatty acid oxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced NADPH oxidase activity. Therapies aimed to reduce oxidative stress and enhance antioxidant defense have been employed to reduce cardiac dysfunction in the MetS in animals. In contrast, large scale clinical trials using antioxidants therapies for the treatment of CVD have been disappointing because of the lack of efficacy and undesired side effects. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the mechanisms underlying cardiac dysfunction in the MetS with a special interest in the role of oxidative stress. Finally, we will update the reader on the results obtained with natural antioxidant and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant therapies for the treatment of CVD in the MetS.
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Treatment with a SOD Mimetic Reduces Visceral Adiposity, Adipocyte Death, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat-Fed Mice.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2013
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OBJECTIVE: Obesity is associated with enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in adipose tissue. However, a causal role for ROS in adipose tissue expansion after high fat feeding is not established. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the cell permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic and peroxynitrite scavenger Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride (MnTBAP) on adipose tissue expansion and remodeling in response to high fat diet (HFD) in mice. DESIGN AND METHODS: Male C57BL/6j mice were fed normal chow or high fat diet (HFD) and treated with saline or MnTBAP for 5 weeks. The effects of MnTBAP on body weights, whole body energy expenditure, adipose tissue morphology, and gene expression were determined. RESULTS: MnTBAP attenuated weight gain and adiposity through a reduction in adipocyte hypertrophy, adipogenesis, and fatty acid uptake in epididymal (eWAT) but not in inguinal (iWAT) white adipose tissue. Furthermore, MnTBAP reduced adipocyte death and inflammation in eWAT and diminished circulating levels of free fatty acids and leptin. Despite these improvements, the development of systemic insulin resistance and diabetes after HFD was not prevented with MnTBAP treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these data suggest a causal role for ROS in the development of diet-induced visceral adiposity but not in the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
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Diabetic cardiomyopathy, causes and effects.
Rev Endocr Metab Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
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Diabetes is associated with increased incidence of heart failure even after controlling for coronary artery disease and hypertension. Thus, as diabetic cardiomyopathy has become an increasingly recognized entity among clinicians, a better understanding of its pathophysiology is necessary for early diagnosis and the development of treatment strategies for diabetes-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. We will review recent basic and clinical research into the manifestations and the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy. The discussion will be focused on the structural, functional and metabolic changes that occur in the myocardium in diabetes and how these changes may contribute to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy in affected humans and relevant animal models.
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Contribution of impaired myocardial insulin signaling to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the heart.
Circulation
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2009
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Diabetes-associated cardiac dysfunction is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, which may contribute to left ventricular dysfunction. The contribution of altered myocardial insulin action, independent of associated changes in systemic metabolism, is incompletely understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal loss of insulin signaling in the heart impairs mitochondrial function.
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Mechanisms for increased myocardial fatty acid utilization following short-term high-fat feeding.
Cardiovasc. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2009
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Diet-induced obesity is associated with increased myocardial fatty acid (FA) utilization, insulin resistance, and cardiac dysfunction. The study was designed to test the hypothesis that impaired glucose utilization accounts for initial changes in FA metabolism.
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UCP3 regulates cardiac efficiency and mitochondrial coupling in high fat-fed mice but not in leptin-deficient mice.
Diabetes
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These studies investigate the role of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in cardiac energy metabolism, cardiac O(2) consumption (MVO(2)), cardiac efficiency (CE), and mitochondrial uncoupling in high fat (HF)-fed or leptin-deficient mice. UCP3KO and wild-type (WT) mice were fed normal chow or HF diets for 10 weeks. Substrate utilization rates, MVO(2), CE, and mitochondrial uncoupling were measured in perfused working hearts and saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers, respectively. Similar analyses were performed in hearts of ob/ob mice lacking UCP3 (U3OB mice). HF increased cardiac UCP3 protein. However, fatty acid (FA) oxidation rates were similarly increased by HF diet in WT and UCP3KO mice. By contrast, MVO(2) increased in WT, but not in UCP3KO with HF, leading to increased CE in UCP3KO mice. Consistent with increased CE, mitochondrial coupling was increased in the hearts of HF-fed UCP3KO mice. Unexpectedly, UCP3 deletion in ob/ob mice reduced FA oxidation but had no effect on MVO(2) or CE. In addition, FA-induced mitochondrial uncoupling was similarly enhanced in U3OB compared with ob/ob hearts and was associated with elevated mitochondrial thioesterase-1 protein content. These studies show that although UCP3 may mediate mitochondrial uncoupling and reduced CE after HF feeding, it does not mediate uncoupling in leptin-deficient states.
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HSPB2 is dispensable for the cardiac hypertrophic response but reduces mitochondrial energetics following pressure overload in mice.
PLoS ONE
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CryAB (HspB5) and HspB2, two small heat shock genes located adjacently in the vertebrate genome, are hypothesized to play distinct roles. Mice lacking both cryab and hspb2 (DKO) are viable and exhibit adult-onset degeneration of skeletal muscle but confounding results from independent groups were reported for cardiac responses to different stressful conditions (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion or pressure overload). To determine the specific requirements of HSPB2 in heart, we generated cardiac-specific HSPB2 deficient (HSPB2cKO) mice and examined their cardiac function under basal conditions and following cardiac pressure overload.
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A mitochondrial pyruvate carrier required for pyruvate uptake in yeast, Drosophila, and humans.
Science
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Pyruvate constitutes a critical branch point in cellular carbon metabolism. We have identified two proteins, Mpc1 and Mpc2, as essential for mitochondrial pyruvate transport in yeast, Drosophila, and humans. Mpc1 and Mpc2 associate to form an ~150-kilodalton complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Yeast and Drosophila mutants lacking MPC1 display impaired pyruvate metabolism, with an accumulation of upstream metabolites and a depletion of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Loss of yeast Mpc1 results in defective mitochondrial pyruvate uptake, and silencing of MPC1 or MPC2 in mammalian cells impairs pyruvate oxidation. A point mutation in MPC1 provides resistance to a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier. Human genetic studies of three families with children suffering from lactic acidosis and hyperpyruvatemia revealed a causal locus that mapped to MPC1, changing single amino acids that are conserved throughout eukaryotes. These data demonstrate that Mpc1 and Mpc2 form an essential part of the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier.
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Early mitochondrial adaptations in skeletal muscle to diet-induced obesity are strain dependent and determine oxidative stress and energy expenditure but not insulin sensitivity.
Endocrinology
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This study sought to elucidate the relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance in two mouse models with differential susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. We examined the time course of mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance in obesity-prone C57B and obesity-resistant FVB mouse strains in response to high-fat feeding. After 5 wk, impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle developed in both strains in the absence of any impairment in proximal insulin signaling. Impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity preceded the development of insulin resistant glucose uptake in C57B mice in concert with increased oxidative stress in skeletal muscle. By contrast, mitochondrial uncoupling in FVB mice, which prevented oxidative stress and increased energy expenditure, did not prevent insulin resistant glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Preventing oxidative stress in C57B mice treated systemically with an antioxidant normalized skeletal muscle mitochondrial function but failed to normalize glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, high fat-fed uncoupling protein 3 knockout mice developed increased oxidative stress that did not worsen glucose tolerance. In the evolution of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, initial but divergent strain-dependent mitochondrial adaptations modulate oxidative stress and energy expenditure without influencing the onset of impaired insulin-mediated glucose uptake.
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Genetic loss of insulin receptors worsens cardiac efficiency in diabetes.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
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To determine the contribution of insulin signaling versus systemic metabolism to metabolic and mitochondrial alterations in type 1 diabetic hearts and test the hypothesis that antecedent mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to impaired cardiac efficiency (CE) in diabetes.
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Cytosolic, but not mitochondrial, oxidative stress is a likely contributor to cardiac hypertrophy resulting from cardiac specific GLUT4 deletion in mice.
FEBS J.
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We hypothesized that oxidative stress may contribute to the development of hypertrophy observed in mice with cardiac specific ablation of the insulin sensitive glucose transporter 4 gene (GLUT4, G4H(-/-) ). Measurements of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) in isolated mitochondria and whole heart homogenates were increased resulting in a lower ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH) to GSSG. Membrane translocation of the p67(phox) subunit of cardiac NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) was markedly increased in G4H(-/-) mice, suggesting elevated activity. To determine if oxidative stress was contributing to cardiac hypertrophy, 4-week-old control (Con) and G4H(-/-) mice were treated with either tempol (T, 1 mm, drinking water), a whole cell antioxidant, or Mn(III) tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin chloride (MnTBAP, 10 mg·kg(-1) , intraperitoneally), a mitochondrial targeted antioxidant, for 28 days. Tempol attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in G4H(-/-) mice (heart : tibia, Con 6.82 ± 0.35, G4H(-/-) 8.83 ± 0.34, Con + T 6.82 ± 0.46, G4H(-/-) + T 7.57 ± 0.3), without changing GSH : GSSG, glutathione peroxidase 4 or membrane translocation of the p67(phox) . Tempol did not modify phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3? or thioredoxin-2. In contrast, MnTBAP lowered mitochondrial GSSG and improved GSH : GSSG, but did not prevent hypertrophy, indicating that mitochondrial oxidative stress may not be critical for hypertrophy in this model. The ability of tempol to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy suggests that a cytosolic source of reactive oxygen species, probably NOX2, may contribute to the hypertrophic phenotype in G4H(-/-) mice.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.