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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Characterizing self-reported sleep disturbance following mild traumatic brain injury.
J. Neurotrauma
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2014
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Sleep disturbance following mTBI is commonly reported as debilitating and persistent. However, the nature of this disturbance is poorly understood. This study sought to characterize sleep following mTBI compared to a control group. A cross-sectional matched case control design was used. Thirty-three individuals with recent mTBI (1-6 months ago) and 33 age, gender, and ethnicity matched controls completed established questionnaires of sleep quality, quantity, timing, and sleep-related daytime impairment. MTBI participants were compared to an independent sample of close-matched controls (CMCs; n = 33) to allow partial internal replication. Compared to controls, people with mTBI reported significantly greater sleep disturbance, more severe insomnia symptoms, a longer duration of wake after sleep onset (WASO), and greater sleep-related impairment (all medium to large effects, Cohen's d >0.5). No differences were found in sleep quantity, timing, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency or daytime sleepiness. All findings except a measure of sleep timing (i.e., sleep midpoint) were replicated for CMCs. These results indicate a difference in the magnitude and nature of perceived sleep disturbance following mTBI compared with controls, where people with mTBI report poorer sleep quality and greater impairment from their sleep. The finding that other sleep parameters did not differ has implications for treatment. These findings should guide the provision of clearer advice to patients about the aspects of their sleep that may change following mTBI and which treatments may be suitable.
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Toward the Multilevel Older Person's Transportation and Road Safety Model: A New Perspective on the Role of Demographic, Functional, and Psychosocial Factors.
J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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Self-regulation refers to the practice of using self-imposed restrictions to protect oneself from situations that are, or are perceived to be, unsafe. Within the driving context, self-regulation refers the compensatory practices that some older adults adopt to restrict their driving to situations in which they feel safe. However, the way in which demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors, and the interactions between these factors, influence older adults' driving self-regulation is not well understood. Improving this understanding could lead to new ways of considering the mobility concerns faced by older drivers.
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A GPU-accelerated immersive audio-visual framework for interaction with molecular dynamics using consumer depth sensors.
Faraday Discuss.
PUBLISHED: 06-06-2014
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With advances in computational power, the rapidly growing role of computational/simulation methodologies in the physical sciences, and the development of new human-computer interaction technologies, the field of interactive molecular dynamics seems destined to expand. In this paper, we describe and benchmark the software algorithms and hardware setup for carrying out interactive molecular dynamics utilizing an array of consumer depth sensors. The system works by interpreting the human form as an energy landscape, and superimposing this landscape on a molecular dynamics simulation to chaperone the motion of the simulated atoms, affecting both graphics and sonified simulation data. GPU acceleration has been key to achieving our target of 60 frames per second (FPS), giving an extremely fluid interactive experience. GPU acceleration has also allowed us to scale the system for use in immersive 360° spaces with an array of up to ten depth sensors, allowing several users to simultaneously chaperone the dynamics. The flexibility of our platform for carrying out molecular dynamics simulations has been considerably enhanced by wrappers that facilitate fast communication with a portable selection of GPU-accelerated molecular force evaluation routines. In this paper, we describe a 360° atmospheric molecular dynamics simulation we have run in a chemistry/physics education context. We also describe initial tests in which users have been able to chaperone the dynamics of 10-alanine peptide embedded in an explicit water solvent. Using this system, both expert and novice users have been able to accelerate peptide rare event dynamics by 3-4 orders of magnitude.
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Rapid decomposition and visualisation of protein-ligand binding free energies by residue and by water.
Faraday Discuss.
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2014
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Recent advances in computational hardware, software and algorithms enable simulations of protein-ligand complexes to achieve timescales during which complete ligand binding and unbinding pathways can be observed. While observation of such events can promote understanding of binding and unbinding pathways, it does not alone provide information about the molecular drivers for protein-ligand association, nor guidance on how a ligand could be optimised to better bind to the protein. We have developed the waterswap (C. J. Woods et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 134, 054114) absolute binding free energy method that calculates binding affinities by exchanging the ligand with an equivalent volume of water. A significant advantage of this method is that the binding free energy is calculated using a single reaction coordinate from a single simulation. This has enabled the development of new visualisations of binding affinities based on free energy decompositions to per-residue and per-water molecule components. These provide a clear picture of which protein-ligand interactions are strong, and which active site water molecules are stabilised or destabilised upon binding. Optimisation of the algorithms underlying the decomposition enables near-real-time visualisation, allowing these calculations to be used either to provide interactive feedback to a ligand designer, or to provide run-time analysis of protein-ligand molecular dynamics simulations.
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A high-resolution spatiotemporal atlas of gene expression of the developing mouse brain.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2014
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To provide a temporal framework for the genoarchitecture of brain development, we generated in situ hybridization data for embryonic and postnatal mouse brain at seven developmental stages for ?2,100 genes, which were processed with an automated informatics pipeline and manually annotated. This resource comprises 434,946 images, seven reference atlases, an ontogenetic ontology, and tools to explore coexpression of genes across neurodevelopment. Gene sets coinciding with developmental phenomena were identified. A temporal shift in the principles governing the molecular organization of the brain was detected, with transient neuromeric, plate-based organization of the brain present at E11.5 and E13.5. Finally, these data provided a transcription factor code that discriminates brain structures and identifies the developmental age of a tissue, providing a foundation for eventual genetic manipulation or tracking of specific brain structures over development. The resource is available as the Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas (http://developingmouse.brain-map.org).
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Continuing to drive while sleepy: The influence of sleepiness countermeasures, motivation for driving sleepy, and risk perception.
Accid Anal Prev
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2014
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Driver sleepiness is a major contributor to road crashes. The current study sought to examine the association between perceptions of effectiveness of six sleepiness countermeasures and their relationship with self-reports of continuing to drive while sleepy among 309 drivers after controlling for the influence of age, sex, motivation for driving sleepy, and risk perception of sleepy driving. The results demonstrate that the variables of age, sex, motivation, and risk perception were significantly associated with self-reports of continuing to drive while sleepy and only one countermeasure was associated with self-reports of continuing to drive while sleepy. Further, it was found that age differences in self-reports of continuing to drive while sleepy was mediated by participants' motivation and risk perception. These findings highlight modifiable factors that could be focused on with interventions that seek to modify drivers' attitudes and behaviours of driving while sleepy.
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Liking for high fat foods in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.
Appetite
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2014
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Excess weight and obesity are factors that are strongly associated with risk for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA). Weight loss has been associated with improvements in clinical indicators of OSA severity; however, patients' beliefs about diet change have not been investigated. This study utilized a validated behaviour change model to estimate the relationship between food liking, food intake and indices of OSA severity. Two-hundred and six OSA patients recruited from a Sleep Disorders Clinic completed standardized questionnaires of: a) fat and fibre food intake, food liking, and food knowledge and; b) attitudes and intentions towards fat reduction. OSA severity and body mass index (BMI) were objectively measured using standard clinical guidelines. The relationship between liking for high fat food and OSA severity was tested with hierarchical regression. Gender and BMI explained a significant 20% of the variance in OSA severity, Fibre Liking accounted for an additional 6% (a negative relationship), and Fat Liking accounted for a further 3.6% of variance. Although the majority of individuals (47%) were currently "active" in reducing fat intake, overall the patients' dietary beliefs and behaviours did not correspond. The independent relationship between OSA severity and liking for high fat foods (and disliking of high fibre foods) may be consistent with a two-way interaction between sleep disruption and food choice. Whilst the majority of OSA patients were intentionally active in changing to a healthy diet, further emphasis on improving healthy eating practices and beliefs in this population is necessary.
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The effects of sleep restriction on executive inhibitory control and affect in young adults.
J Adolesc Health
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2014
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Young adults regularly experience restricted sleep due to a range of social, educational, and vocational commitments. Evidence suggests that extended periods of sleep deprivation negatively impact affective and inhibitory control mechanisms leading to behavioral consequences such as increased emotional reactivity and impulsive behavior. It is less clear whether acute periods of restricted sleep produce the same behavioral consequences.
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A study protocol: A community pharmacy-based intervention for improving the management of sleep disorders in the community settings.
BMC Health Serv Res
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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Sleep disorders are very common in the community and are estimated to affect up to 45% of the world's population. Pharmacists are in a position to give advice and provide appropriate services to individuals who are unable to easily access medical care. The purpose of this study is to develop an intervention to improve the management of sleep disorders in the community. The aims are- (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacy-based intervention in managing sleep disorders, (2) to evaluate the role of actigraph as an objective measure in monitoring certain sleep disorders and (3) to evaluate the extended role of community pharmacists in managing sleep disorders. This intervention is developed to monitor individuals undergoing treatment and overcome the difficulties in validating self-reported feedback.
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The impact of germline mutations on targeted therapy.
J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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Targeted therapies provide clinical benefit and improved therapeutic index. They have a growing prominence in patient management and focus in drug development. Their development is fuelled by our deepening knowledge of complex disease phenotypes and the need for improvement in new therapeutic efficacy. Extrapolation of the biological discovery through to new therapy targeting the causal biological variants to drive clinical gain is challenging. Here, we review the impact of germline mutations on targeted therapies. Historically, germline changes have contributed most to our understanding of disease mechanisms, drug metabolism and exposure, the latter of which has enabled safer positioning of therapies, such as clopidogrel and irinotecan. Similarly, prescreening for germline variants can avoid potentially fatal hypersensitivity reactions with abacavir. However, germline mutations continue to emerge as a central player in targeting therapeutics; ivacaftor drives partial restoration of mucus secretion in cystic fibrosis patients harbouring specific mutations, and treatment with olaparib exploits germline mutations in BRCA genes to drive synthetic lethality as an anti-cancer mechanism. Central is definition of the causal link, association or contribution to the biological variance - and that we believe it is drugable for therapeutic gain. The demand for better therapies to treat modern diseases provides the appetite for continued investigation of the biological variance associated with germline mutations, inevitably leading to increased impact on the development of targeted therapeutics.
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Stop and revive? The effectiveness of nap and active rest breaks for reducing driver sleepiness.
Psychophysiology
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2014
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The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two commonly utilized sleepiness countermeasures: a nap break and an active rest break. The effects of the countermeasures were evaluated by physiological (EEG), subjective, and driving performance measures. Participants completed 2?h of simulated driving, followed by a 15-min nap break or a 15-min active rest break, then completed the final hour of simulated driving. The nap break reduced EEG and subjective sleepiness. The active rest break did not reduce EEG sleepiness, with sleepiness levels eventually increasing, and resulted in an immediate reduction of subjective sleepiness. No difference was found between the two breaks for the driving performance measure. The immediate reduction of subjective sleepiness after the active rest break could leave drivers with erroneous perceptions of their sleepiness, particularly with increases of physiological sleepiness after the break.
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Clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Syst Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2014
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Although health care providers utilize classically described signs and symptoms to diagnose tension pneumothorax, available literature sources differ in their descriptions of its clinical manifestations. Moreover, while the clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax have been suggested to differ among subjects of varying respiratory status, it remains unknown if these differences are supported by clinical evidence. Thus, the primary objective of this study is to systematically describe and contrast the clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax among patients receiving positive pressure ventilation versus those who are breathing unassisted.
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Heat-shock protein A8 restores sperm membrane integrity by increasing plasma membrane fluidity.
Reproduction
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The constitutive 70? kDa heat-shock protein, HSPA8, has previously been shown to contribute to the long-term survival of spermatozoa inside the mammalian female reproductive tract. Here, we show that a recombinant form of HSPA8 rapidly promotes the viability of uncapacitated spermatozoa, the ability of spermatozoa to bind to oviductal epithelial cells, enhances IVF performance, and decreases sperm mitochondrial activity. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that the repair of membrane damage is achieved by an almost instantaneous increase in sperm membrane fluidity. The ability of HSPA8 to influence membrane stability and fluidity, as well as its conserved nature among mammalian species, supports the idea that this protein protects sperm survival through membrane repair mechanisms. Free Persian abstract A Persian translation of the abstract is freely available online at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/147/5/719/suppl/DC1.
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Analysis and assay of oseltamivir-resistant mutants of influenza neuraminidase via direct observation of drug unbinding and rebinding in simulation.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 10-30-2013
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The emergence of influenza drug resistance is a major public health concern. The molecular basis of resistance to oseltamivir (Tamiflu) is investigated using a computational assay involving multiple 500 ns unrestrained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of oseltamivir complexed with mutants of H1N1-2009 influenza neuraminidase. The simulations, accelerated using graphics processors (GPUs), and using a fully explicit model of water, are of sufficient length to observe multiple drug unbinding and rebinding events. Drug unbinding occurs during simulations of known oseltamivir-resistant mutants of neuraminidase. Molecular-level rationalizations of drug resistance are revealed by analysis of these unbinding trajectories, with particular emphasis on the dynamics of the mutant residues. The results indicate that MD simulations can predict weakening of binding associated with drug resistance. In addition, visualization and analysis of binding site water molecules reveal their importance in stabilizing the binding mode of the drug. Drug unbinding is accompanied by conformational changes, driven by the mutant residues, which results in flooding of a key pocket containing tightly bound water molecules. This displaces oseltamivir, allowing the tightly bound water molecules to be released into bulk. In addition to the role of water, analysis of the trajectories reveals novel behavior of the structurally important 150-loop. Motion of the loop, which can move between an open and closed conformation, is intimately associated with drug unbinding and rebinding. Opening of the loop occurs coincidentally with drug unbinding, and interactions between oseltamivir and the loop seem to aid in the repositioning of the drug back into an approximation of its original binding mode on rebinding. The similarity of oseltamivir to a transition state analogue for neuraminidase suggests that the dynamics of the loop could play an important functional role in the enzyme, with loop closing aiding in binding of the substrate and loop opening aiding the release of the product.
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Computational Assay of H7N9 Influenza Neuraminidase Reveals R292K Mutation Reduces Drug Binding Affinity.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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The emergence of a novel H7N9 avian influenza that infects humans is a serious cause for concern. Of the genome sequences of H7N9 neuraminidase available, one contains a substitution of arginine to lysine at position 292, suggesting a potential for reduced drug binding efficacy. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of oseltamivir, zanamivir and peramivir bound to H7N9, H7N9-R292K, and a structurally related H11N9 neuraminidase. They show that H7N9 neuraminidase is structurally homologous to H11N9, binding the drugs in identical modes. The simulations reveal that the R292K mutation disrupts drug binding in H7N9 in a comparable manner to that observed experimentally for H11N9-R292K. Absolute binding free energy calculations with the WaterSwap method confirm a reduction in binding affinity. This indicates that the efficacy of antiviral drugs against H7N9-R292K will be reduced. Simulations can assist in predicting disruption of binding caused by mutations in neuraminidase, thereby providing a computational assay.
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Management of over-the-counter insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies: a standardized patient study.
Int J Pharm Pract
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2013
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To evaluate the current management of over-the-counter (OTC) insomnia complaints in Australian community pharmacies using standardized patient methodology.
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Fluorogenic dansyl-ligated gold nanoparticles for the detection of sulfur mustard by displacement assay.
Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2013
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The dansyl fluorophore ligated to gold nanoparticles via imidazole and amine groups affords conjugates capable of detecting micromolar concentrations of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard by a fluorescence switching ON displacement assay.
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Haematogenous Spread of Staphylococcus aureus from an Iliacus Abscess to an ACL Reconstructed Knee.
Case Rep Orthop
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2013
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We describe a case of a 19-year-old male who presented to the South West Health Service with a septic knee, secondary to haematogenous spread from an iliacus abscess. Thus far, there have been no reported cases of haematogenous spread of infection from an iliacus abscess to an ACL reconstructed knee, let alone in a healthy young person with no risk factors. The patient has had several washouts of the knee along with the drainage of the abscess. The ACL graft was saved with the patient making a complete recovery.
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Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).
Int J Exp Pathol
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID(50) , were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema.
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Motivational interviewing (MINT) improves continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) acceptance and adherence: a randomized controlled trial.
J Consult Clin Psychol
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2011
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Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with a new diagnosis of OSA.
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Exploring knowledge exchange: a useful framework for practice and policy.
Soc Sci Med
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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Knowledge translation is underpinned by a dynamic and social knowledge exchange process but there are few descriptions of how this unfolds in practice settings. This has hampered attempts to produce realistic and useful models to help policymakers and researchers understand how knowledge exchange works. This paper reports the results of research which investigated the nature of knowledge exchange. We aimed to understand whether dynamic and fluid definitions of knowledge exchange are valid and to produce a realistic, descriptive framework of knowledge exchange. Our research was informed by a realist approach. We embedded a knowledge broker within three service delivery teams across a mental health organisation in the UK, each of whom was grappling with specific challenges. The knowledge broker participated in the teams problem-solving process and collected observational fieldnotes. We also interviewed the team members. Observational and interview data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to determine and describe the nature of the knowledge exchange process in more detail. This enabled us to refine our conceptual framework of knowledge exchange. We found that knowledge exchange can be understood as a dynamic and fluid process which incorporates distinct forms of knowledge from multiple sources. Quantitative analysis illustrated that five broadly-defined components of knowledge exchange (problem, context, knowledge, activities, use) can all be in play at any one time and do not occur in a set order. Qualitative analysis revealed a number of distinct themes which better described the nature of knowledge exchange. By shedding light on the nature of knowledge exchange, our findings problematise some of the linear, technicist approaches to knowledge translation. The revised model of knowledge exchange which we propose here could therefore help to reorient thinking about knowledge exchange and act as a starting point for further exploration and evaluation of the knowledge exchange process.
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Hybrid open-endovascular repair of a contained suprarenal mycotic aneurysm using femoral vein.
J. Vasc. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2011
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Mycotic aneurysms have a high mortality rate, predominantly driven by sepsis. We present a 61-year-old patient who was treated with a hybrid open-endovascular repair using autologous femoral vein as a single channel revascularization. This provided a practical and innovative approach to a high-risk situation.
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Older adults safety perceptions of driving situations: towards a new driving self-regulation scale.
Accid Anal Prev
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2011
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The term driving self-restriction is used in the road safety literature to describe the behaviour of some older drivers. It includes the notion that older drivers will avoid driving in specific, usually self-identified situations, such as those in which safety is compromised. We sought to identify the situations that older drivers report avoiding; and, to determine the adequacy of a key measure of such behaviour. A sample of 75 drivers aged 65 years and older completed Baldock et al.s modification of the Driving Habits Questionnaire avoidance items (Baldock et al., 2006), the Driving Behaviour Questionnaire, and open-ended items that elicited written descriptions of the most and least safe driving situation. Consistent with previous results, we found a relatively low level of driving self-restriction and infrequent episodes of aggressive violations. However, when combined with the situation descriptions, these data suggest that Driving Habits Questionnaire did not cover all of the situations that older drivers might choose avoid. We suggest that a new avoidance scale is needed and we present a new item pool that may be used for this purpose.
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The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2011
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Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central) or intrinsic (retinal) network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years) with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC) and outer retina (cone photoreceptors) was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux). Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin) retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.
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Primary systemic amyloidosis presenting as idiopathic inflammatory colitis.
BMJ Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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A 75-year old-female was referred with chest pain. She was fully investigated and it was felt that her symptoms were non-cardiac. Four months later, she was seen in gastroenterology outpatients with bloody diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Colonoscopy demonstrated inflammation up to the splenic flexure and histology confirmed inflammatory colitis. Later, she developed dyspepsia and weight loss. An oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) showed Helicobacter pylori negative erosive gastritis with a benign duodenal ulcer. Whole body CT scan was normal. Ten months later, she was admitted with dyspnoea due to severe heart failure. The admission ECG had significantly changed, now showing low voltage complexes and repeat echocardiography showed restrictive cardiomyopathy. Specific congo red staining on the biopsy specimens from the previous OGD and colonoscopy confirmed amyloid deposits. Further investigations detected an underlying light chain myeloma causing systemic (AL) amyloidosis. Unfortunately, her condition deteriorated rapidly and she died shortly afterwards.
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Successful glue embolization of a late type 1A endoleak causing abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.
Vasc Endovascular Surg
PUBLISHED: 12-13-2010
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We describe the successful treatment with n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization of a ruptured infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by a late type-1A endoleak 10 years after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR).
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An investigation of the relationship between subjective sleep quality, loneliness and mood in an Australian sample: can daily routine explain the links?
Int J Soc Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2010
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Loneliness and low mood are associated with significant negative health outcomes including poor sleep, but the strength of the evidence underlying these associations varies. There is strong evidence that poor sleep quality and low mood are linked, but only emerging evidence that loneliness and poor sleep are associated.
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Inland capture fisheries.
Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
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The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.
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Cues to starting CPAP in obstructive sleep apnea: development and validation of the cues to CPAP Use Questionnaire.
J Clin Sleep Med
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2010
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The reasons that a patient has to start treatment, their "Cues to Action", are important for determining subsequent health behaviors. Cues to action are an explicit component of the Health Belief Model of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) acceptance. At present, there is no scale available to measure this construct for individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This paper aims to develop, validate, and describe responding patterns within a sample of patients with OSA to the Cues to CPAP Use Questionnaire (CCUQ).
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Conservative management of segmental infarction of the greater omentum: a case report and review of literature.
Case Rep Med
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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Segmental omental infarction (SOI) is a rare cause of acute abdominal pain. Depending on the site of infarction, it mimics conditions like appendicitis, cholecystitis, and diverticulitis. Before the widespread use of Computed Tomography (CT), the diagnosis was usually made intraoperatively. SOI produces characteristic radiological appearances on CT scan; hence, correct diagnosis using this form of imaging may prevent unnecessary surgery. We present the case of a young woman who was treated conservatively after accurate radiological diagnosis.
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Self-consistent liquid-to-gas mass transfer calculations.
Bioresour. Technol.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2010
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This work develops an alternative gas transfer calculation method to the two methods currently used in anaerobic digestion modelling. The current calculation methods are problematic because one is computationally stiff, while the other introduces an artificial overpressure. The new approach began by noting that the gas partial pressures are the same as the partial flows at the liquid/gas interface, and then used the self-consistency requirement to develop gas pressure equations which were used by a search algorithm. The new approach took about three iterations to achieve a flow precision better than 2x10(-7) mol h(-1) l(-1), and was self-consistent and stable even when working with eight gases.
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Development and reliability of an intraoperative first metatarsophalangeal joint cartilage evaluation tool for use in hallux valgus surgery.
J Foot Ankle Surg
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2010
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The objective of this study was to examine the reliability of an intraoperative evaluation tool for assessing cartilage degeneration of the first metatarsophalangeal joint in hallux valgus surgery. During hallux valgus reconstruction, 2 examiners documented the location, depth, and surface area of cartilage lesions affecting the first MTPJ in 20 females aged 17 to 69 (mean 50.9 ± 13.5) years. Depth of cartilage lesions was assessed using the 5-level International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scale and a 3-level scale (normal, partial thickness, full thickness). Interexaminer reliability of lesion location and depth was assessed using absolute percentage agreement and kappa (?) statistics, and interexaminer reliability of lesion surface area was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and 95% limits of agreement (LOAs). For lesion location, percentage agreement ranged from 90% to 100% and ? values ranged from 0.78 to 1.00, reflecting substantial to excellent levels of agreement. For lesion depth using the ICRS and 3-level scale, percentage agreement ranged from 33% to 100% and weighted ? values ranged from 0 to 1.00, reflecting poor to excellent levels of agreement. For lesion surface area, the ICC was 0.98 (95% confidence interval = 0.97 to 0.99) and 95% LOA was 0.74 to 1.41, indicating excellent reliability. The results of this study demonstrate a generally high degree of reliability between examiners for the intraoperative use of the first metatarsophalangeal joint cartilage evaluation tool, and the tool may have some value in predicting surgical outcomes associated with hallux valgus.
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A massively multicore parallelization of the Kohn-Sham energy gradients.
J Comput Chem
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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In a previous article [Brown et al., J Chem Theory Comput 2009, 4, 1620], we described a quadrature-based formulation of the Kohn-Sham Coulomb problem that allows for efficient parallelization over thousands of small processor cores. Here, we present the analytic gradients of this modified Kohn-Sham scheme, and describe the parallel implementation of the gradients on a numerical accelerator architecture. We demonstrate an order-of-magnitude acceleration for the combined energy and gradient calculation over a conventional single-core implementation.
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Bone and wound healing augmentation with platelet-rich plasma.
Clin Podiatr Med Surg
PUBLISHED: 09-26-2009
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Over the past two decades, autologous platelets that have been sequestered, concentrated, and mixed with thrombin to generate growth factor-concentrated platelet-rich plasma for application to bone and wounds to aide healing have been a subject of great interest. This article reviews the literature related to the use of autologous platelet-rich plasma in bone and wound healing, and reviews the processes necessary to secure a high concentration of viable platelets. Although not yet definitive, autologous platelet-rich plasma has been shown to be safe, reproducible, and effective in mimicking the natural process of bone and wound healing.
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An examination of the relationship between workload and fatigue within and across consecutive days of work: is the relationship static or dynamic?
J Occup Health Psychol
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2009
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Cognitive-energetical theories of information processing were used to generate predictions regarding the relationship between perceived workload and fatigue within and across consecutive days of work. Repeated measures were taken aboard a naval vessel from a sample of 20 Navy patrol vessel crew members during nonroutine and routine patrols. The hypotheses were tested through growth curve modeling. There was a nonmonotonic relationship between workload and fatigue in the routine patrol; moderate workload was associated with the lowest fatigue. The relationship between workload and fatigue changed over consecutive days in the nonroutine patrol. At the beginning of the patrol, low workload was associated with fatigue. At the end of the patrol, high workload was associated with fatigue. These results suggest that the optimal level of workload can change over time and thus have implications for the management of fatigue, particularly where prolonged operations are involved.
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A technique for isolated arthrodesis of the second metatarsocuneiform joint.
J Foot Ankle Surg
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2009
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Arthrodesis for primary osteoarthrosis of the second metatarsocuneiform joint has received little attention in the literature when compared to salvage of posttraumatic osteoarthrosis after Lisfranc fracture dislocation. The use of screw or plate fixation is commonly advocated for such in situ arthrodesis, and the use of trephine/dowel plugs has also been described. The authors present an alternate approach for addressing primary osteoarthrosis of the second metatarsocuneiform joint with the use of Kirschner wires fashioned into staples with cancellous bone graft interposition.
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Hazard perception in novice and experienced drivers: the effects of sleepiness.
Accid Anal Prev
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2009
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One driver skill that has been found to correlate with crash risk is hazard perception ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate how hazard perception latencies change between high and low sleepiness for a high risk group (novice drivers) and a lower risk group (experienced drivers). Thirty-two novice drivers (aged 17-24 years) and 30 experienced drivers (aged 28-36) completed a validated video-based hazard perception test, in which participants were asked to anticipate genuine traffic conflicts in footage filmed from the drivers perspective, with separate groups tested at either 10a.m. (lower sleepiness) or at 3a.m. (higher sleepiness). We found a significant interaction between sleepiness and experience, indicating that the hazard perception skills of the more experienced drivers were relatively unaffected by mild increases in sleepiness while the inexperienced drivers were significantly slowed. The findings suggest that the disproportionate sleepiness-related accident involvement of young, inexperienced drivers could be partly due to a slowing of their ability to anticipate traffic hazards.
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The health impact of an online heart disease support group: a comparison of moderated versus unmoderated support.
Health Educ Res
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2009
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The aim of this study was to assess whether our online closed community heart care support group and information resource could sustain changes in health behaviour after the moderators withdrew their support. Heart patients (n = 108) living in a deprived area of Greater Manchester were recruited from general practitioners coronary heart disease registries. The sample for this randomized controlled trial was divided in half at random where half of the participants received password-protected access to our health portal and the other half did not. At 6 months follow-up (based on the moderated phase), there was a significant difference between the experimental group and the controls in terms of self-reported diet (eating bad foods less often). This change in behaviour was not sustained during the 3-month unmoderated phase. During this unmoderated phase of the intervention, the experimental group had significantly more health care visits compared with the controls. There was no significant difference between the two phases for either group in terms of exercise, smoking or social support. This study offers insight into the potential implications for health changes of moderating arrangements for online health communities.
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A simplified technique for repair of recurrent peroneal tendon subluxation.
J Foot Ankle Surg
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2009
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Peroneal tendon subluxation or dislocation denotes intermittent or chronic anterior displacement of the peroneus longus and brevis tendons out of their fibro-osseous tunnel at the distal and posterior aspect of the fibula. Numerous surgical techniques have been described to address peroneal tendon subluxation, including isolated or combined soft tissue and osseous reconstructive procedures. The authors present an efficient and simplified approach for addressing this pathology using multiple, nonabsorbable retention sutures without the need for extensive dissection or osteotomy.
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How realistic are older drivers ratings of their driving ability?
Accid Anal Prev
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One strategy that can be used by older drivers to guard against age-related declines in driving capability is to regulate their driving. This strategy presumes that self-judgments of driving capability are realistic. We found no significant relationships between older drivers hazard perception skill ratings and performance on an objective and validated video-based hazard perception test, even when self-ratings of performance on specific scenarios in the test were used. Self-enhancement biases were found across all components of driving skill, including hazard perception. If older drivers judgments of their driving capability are unrealistic, then this may compromise the effectiveness of any self-restriction strategies to reduce crash risk.
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An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the adult human brain transcriptome.
Nature
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Neuroanatomically precise, genome-wide maps of transcript distributions are critical resources to complement genomic sequence data and to correlate functional and genetic brain architecture. Here we describe the generation and analysis of a transcriptional atlas of the adult human brain, comprising extensive histological analysis and comprehensive microarray profiling of ?900 neuroanatomically precise subdivisions in two individuals. Transcriptional regulation varies enormously by anatomical location, with different regions and their constituent cell types displaying robust molecular signatures that are highly conserved between individuals. Analysis of differential gene expression and gene co-expression relationships demonstrates that brain-wide variation strongly reflects the distributions of major cell classes such as neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes and microglia. Local neighbourhood relationships between fine anatomical subdivisions are associated with discrete neuronal subtypes and genes involved with synaptic transmission. The neocortex displays a relatively homogeneous transcriptional pattern, but with distinct features associated selectively with primary sensorimotor cortices and with enriched frontal lobe expression. Notably, the spatial topography of the neocortex is strongly reflected in its molecular topography-the closer two cortical regions, the more similar their transcriptomes. This freely accessible online data resource forms a high-resolution transcriptional baseline for neurogenetic studies of normal and abnormal human brain function.
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A metric-based analysis of structure and content of telephone consultations of final-year medical students in a high-fidelity emergency medicine simulation.
BMJ Open
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In this study we aimed to analyse the structure and content of telephone consultations of final-year medical students in a high-fidelity emergency medicine simulation. The purpose was to identify any areas of deficiency within structure and content in the effective transfer of clinical information via the telephone of final-year medical students.
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The effect of extended wake on postural control in young adults.
Exp Brain Res
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The sleep-wake cycle is a major determinant of locomotor activity in humans, and the neural and physiological processes necessary for optimum postural control may be impaired by an extension of the wake period into habitual sleep time. There is growing evidence for such a contribution from sleep-related factors, but great inconsistency in the methods used to assess this contribution, particularly in control for circadian phase position. Postural control was assessed at hourly intervals across 14 h of extended wake in nine young adult participants. Force plate parameters of medio-lateral and anterior-posterior sway, centre of pressure (CoP) trace length, area, and velocity were assessed with eyes open and eyes closed over 3-min periods. A standard measure of psychomotor vigilance was assessed concurrently under constant routine conditions. After controlling for individual differences in circadian phase position, a significant effect of extended wake was found for anterior-posterior sway and for psychomotor vigilance. These data suggest that extended wake may increase the risk of a fall or other consequences of impaired postural control.
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The relationship between cognitive ability, insight and self-regulatory behaviors: findings from the older driver population.
Accid Anal Prev
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Self-regulation is often promoted as a coping strategy that may allow older drivers to drive safely for longer. Self-regulation depends upon drivers making an accurate assessment of their own ability and having a willingness to practice self-regulatory behaviors to compensate for changes in ability. The current study explored the relationship between older drivers cognitive ability, their driving confidence and their use of self-regulation. An additional study aim was to explore the relationship between these factors and older drivers interest in driving programs. Seventy Australian drivers aged 65 years and over completed a questionnaire about their driving and a brief screening measure of cognitive ability (an untimed Clock Drawing Test). While all participants reported high levels of confidence regarding their driving ability, and agreed that they would continue driving in the foreseeable future, a notable proportion performed poorly on the Clock Drawing Test. Compared to older drivers who successfully completed the Clock Drawing Test, those who failed the cognitive test were significantly less likely to report driving self-regulation, and showed significantly less interest in being involved in driving programs. Older drivers with declining cognitive abilities may not be self-regulating their driving. This group also appears to be unlikely to self-refer to driving programs.
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Serum albumin prevents protein aggregation and amyloid formation and retains chaperone-like activity in the presence of physiological ligands.
J. Biol. Chem.
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Although serum albumin has an established function as a transport protein, evidence is emerging that serum albumin may also have a role as a molecular chaperone. Using established techniques to characterize chaperone interactions, this study demonstrates that bovine serum albumin: 1) preferentially binds stressed over unstressed client proteins; 2) forms stable, soluble, high molecular weight complexes with stressed client proteins; 3) reduces the aggregation of client proteins when it is present at physiological levels; and 4) inhibits amyloid formation by both WT and L55P transthyretin. Although the antiaggregatory effect of serum albumin is maintained in the presence of physiological levels of Ca(2+) and Cu(2+), the presence of free fatty acids significantly alters this activity: stabilizing serum albumin at normal levels but diminishing chaperone-like activity at high concentrations. Moreover, here it is shown that depletion of albumin from human plasma leads to a significant increase in aggregation under physiologically relevant heat and shear stresses. This study demonstrates that serum albumin possesses chaperone-like properties and that this activity is maintained under a number of physiologically relevant conditions.
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Scarf versus chevron osteotomy for the correction of 1-2 intermetatarsal angle in hallux valgus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
J Foot Ankle Surg
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The chevron and scarf osteotomies are commonly used for the surgical management of hallux valgus (HV). However, there is debate as to whether one osteotomy provides more 1-2 intermetatarsal (1-2 IMA) correction than the other. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the effectiveness of 3 types of first metatarsal osteotomy for reducing the 1-2 IMA in HV correction: the chevron osteotomy, the long plantar arm (modified) chevron osteotomy, and the scarf osteotomy. A systematic search for eligible studies was performed of the following databases: Medline, Embase (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCO Host), and The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials. Only English-language studies previous to May 2010 were included in the review. Additional hand and electronic content searches of relevant foot and orthopaedic journals were performed. Criteria for inclusion in this analysis included systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, and case-control studies, as well as case-series studies involving the chevron, scarf, or long plantar arm chevron osteotomy of >20 participants with a minimum of 80% follow-up. Quality of evidence of the included studies was assessed with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. All pooled analyses were based on a fixed effects model. There was a total of 1351 participants who underwent either a chevron (n = 1028), scarf (n = 300), or long plantar arm chevron osteotomy (n = 23). Only one study for the long plantar arm chevron group fitted the eligibility criteria for this review; however, it was not amenable to meta-analysis. The chevron osteotomy was associated with a mean reduction of 1-2 IMA from preoperative to postoperative of 5.33° (95% confidence interval, 5.12 to 5.54, p < .001), and the scarf osteotomy was associated with a mean reduction of 6.21° (95% confidence interval, 5.70 to 6.72, p < .001). There was a statistically significant 0.88° increase in the correction of the 1-2 IMA in favor of the scarf osteotomy compared with the chevron osteotomy. The studies included in this review were of very low- to low-quality evidence. Our findings indicate that the scarf osteotomy provides greater correction of the 1-2 IMA when used for HV correction. However, only a weak recommendation in favor of the scarf osteotomy can be made based on the low quality of evidence of the studies included in this analysis.
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A study of innovative patient safety education.
Clin Teach
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Medical error continues to significantly harm patients, notwithstanding the continued efforts to improve the situation over the past decade. We report a pilot project using high-fidelity simulation to integrate the World Health Organisation (WHO) patient safety curriculum into undergraduate medical education.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.