JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Quality of antibiotic prescription during office hours and out-of-hours in Flemish primary care, using European quality indicators.
Eur J Gen Pract
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Background: European disease-specific antibiotic prescribing quality indicators (APQI) were proposed for seven acute indications (bronchitis, upper respiratory infection, cystitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis media and pneumonia): (a) the percentage of patients prescribed an antibiotic; (b) the percentage of patients receiving the guideline recommended antibiotic; (c) the percentage of patients receiving quinolones. Objectives: To assess the feasibility of calculating values for these 21 APQI using primary care databases; and to assess the quality of antibiotic prescribing in office hours and out-of-hours general practice. Methods: Data was extracted from a morbidity registration network ( http://www.intego.be ) and the out-of-hours service centre in Flanders. Within both databases diagnoses are labelled using the revised second edition of International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC-2-R) and antibiotic prescriptions using Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Results: Both databases allow calculation of APQI values and results are similar. Only for cystitis was the percentage of patients prescribed an antibiotic within the proposed acceptable range. For all indications, the percentage of recommended antibiotics was below the proposed acceptable range (80-100%). The percentage of quinolones was within the proposed acceptable range (0-5%) for otitis media, upper respiratory infection and tonsillitis. Conclusion: Primary care databases can produce APQI values. These values revealed huge opportunities to improve the quality of antibiotic prescribing in office hours and out-of-hours Flemish general practice, especially the prescription of recommended antibiotics.
Related JoVE Video
Influence of chronic comorbidity and medication on the efficacy of treatment in patients with diabetes in general practice.
Br J Gen Pract
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Evidence on the influence of comorbidity and comedication on clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is scarce.
Related JoVE Video
Incident somatic comorbidity after psychosis: results from a retrospective cohort study based on Flemish general practice data.
BMC Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Psychotic conditions and especially schizophrenia, have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Many studies are performed in specialized settings with a strong focus on schizophrenia. Somatic comorbidity after psychosis is studied, using a general practice comorbidity registration network.
Related JoVE Video
Higher incidence of common diagnoses in patients with low back pain in primary care.
Pain Pract
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Most studies on comorbidity in low back pain (LBP) have been conducted in specialized settings with the use of self-reports. This study has an original design using data from family practices: the incidence of the most frequent diseases was compared in patients with and without LBP in 2004. The database includes data from 67 family physicians in 52 family practices in Flanders, Belgium. It contains data from 160,000 different patients with 1,500,000 diagnoses during the period 1994 to 2004. The incidence of the most frequent diagnoses is presented in patients with and without LBP in 2004. The diagnoses were coded according to the ICPC-2-classification. In 2004, the incidence of LBP was 51.4‰ (95% CI: 49.8 to 53.1) in patients aged 18 or older. The incidence was slightly higher in women than in men: 53.0‰ (95% CI: 50.7 to 55.4) vs. 49.9‰ (95% CI: 47.7 to 52.3). The highest incidence was recorded in the age group of 50 to 54?years. The most frequent "other" diagnoses in patients with and without LBP are comparable, but some were more frequent in patients with LBP. Respiratory infections and diseases of the locomotor apparatus (neck syndrome, bursitis) are more frequent in patients with LBP. Low back pain is one of the most frequent diagnoses in general practice. Striking is the relatively higher frequency of common self-limiting diseases in patients with a diagnosis of LBP during the same year. To the authors knowledge, this is the first time that medical demands for non-LBP reasons in family practice have been reported in patients with LBP.
Related JoVE Video
Incidence and outcome of first syncope in primary care: A retrospective cohort study.
BMC Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Assessment of risk for serious cardiovascular outcome after syncope is difficult. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of first syncope in primary care. To investigate the relation between syncope and serious cardiovascular (CV) outcome and serious injury. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study using data from the Intego general practice-based registration network, collecting data from 55 general practices (90 GPs). All patients with a first syncope from 1994 to 2008 were included; five participants without syncope were matched for age and gender for every patient with syncope. The main outcome measures were incidence of first syncope by age and gender and one year risk of serious CV outcome or injury after syncope. RESULTS: 2785 patients with syncope and 13909 matched patients without syncope were included. The overall incidence of a first syncope was 1.91 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 1.83-1.98). The incidence was higher in females (2.42 (95% CI 2.32-2.55) per 1000 person-years) compared to males (1.4 (95% CI 1.32-1.49) per 1000 person-years) and follows a biphasic pattern according to age: a first peak at the age of 15-24 years is followed by a sharp rise above the age of 45. One year serious outcome after syncope was recorded in 12.3% of patients. Increasing age (HR 1.04 (1.03-1.04)), CV comorbidity (HR 3.48 (95% CI 2.48-4.90) and CV risk factors (HR 1.65 (95% CI 1.24-2.18) are associated with serious outcome. Cox regression, adjusting for age, gender, CV comorbidity and risk factors, showed that syncope was an independent risk factor for serious CV outcome or injury (HR 3.99 (95% CI 3.44-4.63)). The other independent risk factors were CV comorbidity (HR 1.81 (95% CI 1.51-2.17)) and age (HR 1.03 (95% CI 1.03-1.04)). CONCLUSIONS: Incidence rate of first syncope in primary care was 1.91 per 1000 person-years. One year risk of serious outcome after syncope was 12.3%. Increasing age, CV comorbidity and risk factors are associated with serious outcome. Compared to a control group, syncope on itself is an independent risk factor for serious outcome (adjusted for age, gender, CV comorbidity and risk factors).
Related JoVE Video
Computerized general practice based networks yield comparable performance with sentinel data in monitoring epidemiological time-course of influenza-like illness and acute respiratory illness.
BMC Fam Pract
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Computerized morbidity registration networks might serve as early warning systems in a time where natural epidemics such as the H1N1 flu can easily spread from one region to another.
Related JoVE Video
Quality assessment of automatically extracted data from GPs EPR.
Stud Health Technol Inform
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There are many secondary benefits to collecting routine primary care data, but we first need to understand some of the properties of this data. In this paper we describe the method used to assess the PPV and sensitivity of data extracted from Belgian GPs EPR (diagnoses, drug prescriptions, referrals, and certain parameters), using data collected through an electronic questionnaire as a gold standard. We describe the results of the ResoPrim phase 2 project, which involved 4 software systems and 43 practices (10,307 patients). This method of assessment could also be applied to other research networks.
Related JoVE Video
Nation-wide primary healthcare research network: a privacy protection assessment.
Stud Health Technol Inform
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Efficiency and privacy protection are essential when setting up nationwide research networks. This paper investigates the extent to which basic services developed to support the provision of care can be re-used, whilst preserving an acceptable privacy protection level, within a large Belgian primary care research network. The generic sustainable confidentiality management model used to assess the privacy protection level of the selected network architecture is described. A short analysis of the current architecture is provided. Our generic model could also be used in other countries.
Related JoVE Video
Relation between diabetes, metformin treatment and the occurrence of malignancies in a Belgian primary care setting.
Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Associations between type 2 diabetic patients and a higher risk of developing cancer have been reported worldwide. Recently, a protective effect of metformin has been described.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.