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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Effectiveness of permethrin-treated clothing to prevent tick exposure in foresters in the central Appalachian region of the USA.
Int J Environ Health Res
PUBLISHED: 10-08-2014
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Outdoor workers are at risk from mosquito and tick bites and the extent to which exposures are linked to vector-borne disease is not understood. This pilot study characterizes for ester exposure to mosquitoes and ticks, and assesses effectiveness of permethrin-treated clothing for prevention of tick bites. Foresters (N = 34) from Kentucky, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia were placed into treatment (permethrin-treated clothing) or control (untreated clothing) groups. Foresters completed questionnaires about work-related tick/mosquito exposure and 454 ticks were collected/identified from May to June 2013. A time-weighted analysis based on information submitted by foresters about time working outdoors showed that control participants received a lower rate of tick exposure (0.15 tick bites/hour; 13 bites/person) compared to treatment participants (0.27 bites/hour; 21 bites/person). However, more control participants (85?%) received at least one tick bite compared to treatment participants (52?%). Outdoor workers should be aware of available protective measures, such as permethrin-treated clothing, that may mitigate occupational risks.
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Prevalence of traumatic brain injury and access to services in an undergraduate population: a pilot study.
Brain Inj
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2014
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The aim of this pilot study was to identify the prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among undergraduate college students, compare common TBI symptoms reported by students with and without a history of TBI and explore how often students with and without TBI access campus services.
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Current status of mosquito control programs in North Carolina: the need for cost-effectiveness analysis.
J Environ Health
PUBLISHED: 04-23-2014
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Mosquito control in the U.S. is both technically specialized and labor intensive with mosquito control programs (MCPs) carrying out services at federal, state, and local levels. The scope of each MCP varies depending on the needs of the region. In the 1970s, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources formed the Public Health Pest Management (PHPM) section to play an active leadership role in training and support for local mosquito control programs across the state. PHPM was disbanded, however, in July 2011 due to state budget cuts. The extent to which recent budget shortfalls have impacted services provided by MCPs is largely unknown. Consequently, the primary objectives of the study described in this article were to 1) assess the current status of MCPs in North Carolina, 2) evaluate the extent to which the operational status of local MCPs affects public health, and 3) evaluate the impacts of losing the PHPM section in North Carolina.
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BSL-3 laboratory practices in the United States: comparison of select agent and non-select agent facilities.
Biosecur Bioterror
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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New construction of biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) laboratories in the United States has increased in the past decade to facilitate research on potential bioterrorism agents. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention inspect BSL-3 facilities and review commissioning documentation, but no single agency has oversight over all BSL-3 facilities. This article explores the extent to which standard operating procedures in US BSL-3 facilities vary between laboratories with select agent or non-select agent status. Comparisons are made for the following variables: personnel training, decontamination, personal protective equipment (PPE), medical surveillance, security access, laboratory structure and maintenance, funding, and pest management. Facilities working with select agents had more complex training programs and decontamination procedures than non-select agent facilities. Personnel working in select agent laboratories were likely to use powered air purifying respirators, while non-select agent laboratories primarily used N95 respirators. More rigorous medical surveillance was carried out in select agent workers (although not required by the select agent program) and a higher level of restrictive access to laboratories was found. Most select agent and non-select agent laboratories reported adequate structural integrity in facilities; however, differences were observed in personnel perception of funding for repairs. Pest management was carried out by select agent personnel more frequently than non-select agent personnel. Our findings support the need to promote high quality biosafety training and standard operating procedures in both select agent and non-select agent laboratories to improve occupational health and safety.
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Survival of West Nile virus-challenged Southern house mosquitoes, Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, in relation to environmental temperatures.
J. Vector Ecol.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2014
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We investigated the effect of West Nile virus (WNV) infection on survival in two colonies of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) originating from Vero Beach and Gainesville, FL. Mosquitoes were fed West Nile virus-infected blood and checked daily for survival. Exposure to WNV decreased survival among Cx. p. quinquefasciatus from Gainesville relative to unexposed individuals at 31° C. In contrast, exposure to WNV enhanced survival among Cx. p. quinquefasciatus from Vero Beach relative to unexposed individuals at 27° C. These results may suggest that exposure to WNV and associated infection could increase or decrease components of fitness, dependent on environmental temperature and intraspecific variation in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus. The relationship between lifespan (time of death in days) and WNV titer differed in the colonies at 31° C and 27° C, suggesting that intraspecific species variation in response to temperature impacts interactions with WNV. While further work is needed to determine if similar effects occur under field conditions, this suggests intraspecific variation in vector competence for WNV and adult survival of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus, both aspects of vectorial capacity.
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Vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) for West Nile virus isolates from Florida.
Trop. Med. Int. Health
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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To assess vector competence (infection, dissemination and transmission) of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for Florida (FL) West Nile virus (WNV) isolates.
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Mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma of the kidney with prominent papillary component, a non-classic morphologic variant. A histologic, immunohistochemical, electron microscopic and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.
Pathol. Res. Pract.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
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Mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma (MTSCC) is a rare type of kidney tumor with relatively indolent behavior. Non-classic morphological variants have not been well studied and rarely been reported. We report a challenging case MTSCC with a peculiar morphology in a 42-year-old man, arising in a background of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Predominant areas with extensive papillary architecture, psammoma bodies and stromal macrophageal aggregates, reminiscent of a papillary renal cell carcinoma (papillary RCC), were intermixed with foci that transitioned into a MTSCC-like morphology exhibiting elongated tubules and a low grade spindle cell component in a background of mucinous stroma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated diffuse positivity for P504s/AMACR and vimentin in tumor cells. Focal positivity for RCC, CD10 and CK7 was also noted. Kidney-specific cadherin, cytokeratin 34betaE12 and TFE3 stains were negative in the tumor. The major differential diagnostic considerations were papillary RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, and Xp11.2 translocation carcinoma. Negative FISH studies for trisomy 7 and 17 in both papillary and spindled components supported the diagnosis of MTSCC. The ultrastructural profile was not entirely indicative of the cellular origin of the tumor. Cytogenetic analysis should be performed in atypical cases of MTSCC for precise diagnosis.
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RAG1 reversion mosaicism in a patient with omenn syndrome.
J. Clin. Immunol.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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To identify mechanisms of disease in a child born to consanguineous parents, who presented with Omenn syndrome (OS) and was found to carry a heterozygous RAG1 mutation in peripheral blood DNA.
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Assessment of occupational health and safety hazard exposures among working college students.
Am. J. Ind. Med.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2013
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Adolescents and young adults have higher injury rates than their adult counterparts in similar jobs. This study used the working college student population to assess health and safety hazards in the workplace, characterize related occupational diseases and injuries, and describe worker health/safety activities provided by employers.
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Systems analysis of a RIG-I agonist inducing broad spectrum inhibition of virus infectivity.
PLoS Pathog.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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The RIG-I like receptor pathway is stimulated during RNA virus infection by interaction between cytosolic RIG-I and viral RNA structures that contain short hairpin dsRNA and 5 triphosphate (5ppp) terminal structure. In the present study, an RNA agonist of RIG-I was synthesized in vitro and shown to stimulate RIG-I-dependent antiviral responses at concentrations in the picomolar range. In human lung epithelial A549 cells, 5pppRNA specifically stimulated multiple parameters of the innate antiviral response, including IRF3, IRF7 and STAT1 activation, and induction of inflammatory and interferon stimulated genes - hallmarks of a fully functional antiviral response. Evaluation of the magnitude and duration of gene expression by transcriptional profiling identified a robust, sustained and diversified antiviral and inflammatory response characterized by enhanced pathogen recognition and interferon (IFN) signaling. Bioinformatics analysis further identified a transcriptional signature uniquely induced by 5pppRNA, and not by IFN?-2b, that included a constellation of IRF7 and NF-kB target genes capable of mobilizing multiple arms of the innate and adaptive immune response. Treatment of primary PBMCs or lung epithelial A549 cells with 5pppRNA provided significant protection against a spectrum of RNA and DNA viruses. In C57Bl/6 mice, intravenous administration of 5pppRNA protected animals from a lethal challenge with H1N1 Influenza, reduced virus titers in mouse lungs and protected animals from virus-induced pneumonia. Strikingly, the RIG-I-specific transcriptional response afforded partial protection from influenza challenge, even in the absence of type I interferon signaling. This systems approach provides transcriptional, biochemical, and in vivo analysis of the antiviral efficacy of 5pppRNA and highlights the therapeutic potential associated with the use of RIG-I agonists as broad spectrum antiviral agents.
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BCL-2 inhibitors sensitize therapy-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to VSV oncolysis.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2013
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Many primary cancers including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are resistant to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-induced oncolysis due to overexpression of the antiapoptotic and antiautophagic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) family. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of CLL cell death induced as a consequence of VSV infection in the presence of BCL-2 inhibitors, obatoclax, and ABT-737 in primary ex vivo CLL patient samples. Microarray analysis of primary CD19? CD5? CLL cells treated with obatoclax and VSV revealed changes in expression of genes regulating apoptosis, the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and cellular metabolism. A combined therapeutic effect was observed for VSV and BCL-2 inhibitors in cells from untreated patients and from patients unresponsive to standard of care therapy. In addition, combination treatment induced several markers of autophagy--LC3-II accumulation, p62 degradation, and staining of autophagic vacuoles. Inhibition of early stage autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) led to increased apoptosis in CLL samples. Mechanistically, a combination of BCL-2 inhibitors and VSV disrupted inhibitory interactions of Beclin-1 with BCL-2 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), thus biasing cells toward autophagy. We propose a mechanism in which changes in cellular metabolism, coupled with pharmacologic disruption of the BCL-2-Beclin-1 interactions, facilitate induction of apoptosis and autophagy to mediate the cytolytic effect of VSV.
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Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.
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Impact of West Nile virus dose and incubation period on vector competence of Culex nigripalpus (Diptera: Culicidae).
Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-14-2011
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Female Culex nigripalpus were fed blood containing a low dose (6.3±0.01 logs plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL) or high dose (7.3±0.1 logs PFU/mL) of West Nile virus (WNV) and maintained at 28°C for incubation periods (IPs) of 6 or 12 days. Vector competence was measured using rates of infection (% with WNV-positive bodies), dissemination (% infected with WNV-positive legs), and transmission (% infected with WNV-positive saliva). Infection rates were not influenced by dose or IP. Dissemination rates were significantly higher at the high dose, and this was dependent on IP. Despite 100% infection and 90% dissemination in the most permissive treatment of high dose and 12 days, only 11% transmission was observed. Virus titers in body and leg tissues were significantly lower at the low dose and the titers were not influenced by IP. We show that not all mosquitoes with infections and/or disseminated infections transmit WNV under the conditions of this test. Therefore, characterizing the transmission ability of a vector population using infection or dissemination as indicators of transmission may provide inaccurate information. The complex relationships between infection, dissemination, and transmission must be evaluated under a variety of biological and environmental conditions to begin to assess the epidemiological risk of natural mosquito populations.
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An e-health solution for people with alcohol problems.
Alcohol Res Health
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2011
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Self-management of chronic diseases has been a research focus for years. Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have played a significant role in aiding patients and their families with that management task. The recent dramatic increase in smartphone capabilities has expanded the potential of these technologies by facilitating the integration of features specific to cell phones with advanced capabilities that extend the reach of what type of information can be assessed and which services can be provided. A recent review of the literature covering the use of ICTs in managing chronic diseases, including addiction, has examined the effectiveness of ICTs, with an emphasis on technologies tested in randomized controlled trials. One example of an addiction-relapse prevention system currently being tested is the Alcohol Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (A-CHESS) Program.
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Environmental and biological factors influencing Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) vector competence for West Nile Virus.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2010
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Interactions between environmental and biological factors affect the vector competence of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for West Nile virus. Three age cohorts from two Cx. p. quinquefasciatus colonies were fed blood containing a low- or high-virus dose, and each group was held at two different extrinsic incubation temperatures (EIT) for 13 days. The colonies differed in the way that they responded to the effects of the environment on vector competence. The effects of mosquito age on aspects of vector competence were dependent on the EIT and dose, and they changed depending on the colony. Complex interactions must be considered in laboratory studies of vector competence, because the extent of the genetic and environmental variation controlling vector competence in nature is largely unknown. Differences in the environmental (EIT and dose) and biological (mosquito age and colony) effects from previous studies of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus vector competence for St. Louis encephalitis virus are discussed.
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A simple method for determining arbovirus transmission in mosquitoes.
J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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We present a simplified method for the collection of mosquito saliva to determine Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus transmission of West Nile virus that can be used for experiments requiring large sample sizes.
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Effects of West Nile virus dose and extrinsic incubation temperature on temporal progression of vector competence in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus.
J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2010
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Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were fed blood containing either 7.0 +/- 0.1 logs plaque-forming units (pfu)/ml (high dose) or 5.9 +/- 0.1 logs pfu/ml (low dose) of West Nile virus and held at extrinsic incubation temperatures (EIT) of 28 degrees C or 25 degrees C. Approximately 20 mosquitoes per dose were collected after incubation periods (IP) of 4, 6, 8, and 12 days postinfection (dpi). Infection rates were influenced by EIT and virus dose but not by IP. Body titer was significantly higher for mosquitoes fed the high dose and held at 28 degrees C at the later IPs (6, 8, and 12 dpi). However, leg titer was significantly higher for mosquitoes at the later IPs but did not differ between EITs or doses. Because infection rates varied with EIT and dose, there is likely a midgut infection barrier influenced by these factors that is not influenced by IP. Dissemination rates were influenced by all 3 factors consistent with the presence of a midgut escape barrier. Dissemination rate, body titer, and leg titer were dependent on IP, indicating the need to investigate multiple time points in vector competence studies to elucidate critical events in infection and dissemination.
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Effects of forced egg retention on the temporal progression of West Nile virus infection in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).
Environ. Entomol.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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Environmental factors that impact the biology of mosquito vectors can have epidemiological implications. Lack of oviposition sites facilitated by environmental factors such as temperature and drought can often force Culex spp. mosquitoes to retain their eggs. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say were fed blood meals containing West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) and either allowed to oviposit or forced to retain their eggs through different time points postinfection (9, 13, 20, 27 d) at 28 degrees C. Oviposition status did not significantly affect rates of WNV infection (% with virus-positive bodies), dissemination (% with virus-positive legs), or transmission (% with virus-positive saliva) for any of the tested time points. As expected, WNV titers in bodies and legs were significantly (P < 0.05) higher at late time points compared with early time points. No significant differences were observed in WNV titers in saliva between time points. There were no significant effects of oviposition status on virus titers of bodies, legs, or saliva. However, we found that egg retention may increase vector competence at early and late time points after infection and that a single oviposition event may decrease vector competence, possibly by activating an immune response against the virus. Environmental changes that influence mosquito biology are important determinants of virus transmission, and further studies are needed to assess the effects of drought on virus transmission risk and how these interactions affect our interpretation of field data.
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A model to assess the accuracy of detecting arboviruses in mosquito pools.
J. Am. Mosq. Control Assoc.
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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Vigilant surveillance of virus prevalence in mosquitoes is essential for risk assessment and outbreak prediction. Accurate virus detection methods are essential for arbovirus surveillance. We have developed a model to estimate the probability of accurately detecting a virus-positive mosquito from pooled field collections using standard molecular techniques. We discuss several factors influencing the probability of virus detection, including the number of virions in the sample, the total sample volume, and the portion of the sample volume that is being tested. Our model determines the probability of obtaining at least 1 virion in the sample that is tested. The model also determines the optimal sample volume that is required in any test to ensure a desired probability of virus detection is achieved, and can be used to support the accuracy of current tests or to optimize existing techniques.
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Environmental and biological factors influencing Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) vector competence for Saint Louis encephalitis virus.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Complex interactions between environmental and biological factors influence the susceptibility of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to St. Louis encephalitis virus and could affect the epidemiology of virus transmission. Similar interactions could have epidemiologic implications for other vector-virus systems. We conducted an experiment to examine four such factors in combination: mosquito age, extrinsic incubation temperature (EIT), virus dose, and colony. The proportion of mosquitoes with body infections or disseminated infections varied between colonies, and was dependant on age, EIT, and dose. We also show that the probability of a body or leg infection interacted in complex ways between colonies, ages, EITs, and doses. The complex interactive effects of environmental and biological factors must be taken into account for studies of vector competence and epidemiology, especially when laboratory studies are used to generalize to natural transmission dynamics where the extent of variation is largely unknown.
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West Nile virus infection alters midgut gene expression in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae).
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Alterations in gene expression in the midgut of female Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus exposed to blood meals containing 6.8 logs plaque-forming units/mL of West Nile virus (WNV) were studied by fluorescent differential display. Twenty-six different cDNAs exhibited reproducible differences after feeding on infected blood. Of these, 21 cDNAs showed an increase in expression, and 5 showed a decrease in expression as a result of WNV presence in the blood meal. GenBank database searches showed that one clone with increased expression, CQ G12A2, shares 94% identity with a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein from Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and 32% identity to Toll-like receptors from Aedes aegypti. We present the first cDNA clone isolated from female Cx. p. quinquefasciatus midgut tissue whose expression changes on exposure to WNV. This cDNA represents a mosquito gene that is an excellent candidate for interacting with WNV in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus and may play a role in disease transmission.
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Effects of virus dose and extrinsic incubation temperature on vector competence of Culex nigripalpus (Diptera: Culicidae) for St. Louis encephalitis virus.
J. Med. Entomol.
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Culex nigripalpus Theobald is a primary vector of St. Louis encephalitis virus in the southeastern United States. Cx. nigripalpus females were fed blood containing a low (4.0 +/- 0.01 log10 plaque-forming unit equivalents (PFUeq) /ml) or high (4.7 +/- 0.1 log10 PFUeq/ml) St. Louis encephalitis virus dose and maintained at extrinsic incubation temperatures (EIT) of 25 or 28 degrees C for 12 d. Vector competence was measured via quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to estimate PFUeq using rates of infection, dissemination, and transmission. There were no differences in infection rates between the two EITs at either dose. The low dose had higher infection rates at both EITs. Dissemination rates were significantly higher at 28 degrees C compared with 25 degrees C at both doses. Virus transmission was observed (<7%) only at 28 degrees C for both doses. The virus titer in body tissues was greater at 28 degrees C compared with 25 degrees C at both doses. The difference between the EITs was greater at the low dose, resulting in a higher titer for the low dose than the high dose at 28 degrees C. Virus titers in leg tissues were greater in mosquitoes fed the high versus low dose, but were not influenced by EIT. Further investigations using a variety of environmental and biological factors would be useful in exploring the complexity of vector competence.
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Vector competence of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) for dengue virus in the Florida Keys.
J. Med. Entomol.
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In 2009-2011, Monroe County in southern Florida experienced locally acquired and traveler-imported focal dengue outbreaks. Aedes aegypti (L.) is the primary vector of dengue virus (DENV) worldwide, is prevalent in Monroe County, and is the suspected vector in Florida. Ae. albopictus (Skuse) is also known to be an important vector of DENV and this species is ubiquitous in Florida; however, it is not yet established in Monroe County. Florida Ae. aegypti (Key West and Stock Island geographic colonies) and Ae. albopictus (Vero Beach geographic colony) were fed blood containing 3.7 Log10 plaque-forming unit equivalents of DENV serotype 1 isolated from a patient involved in the Key West, FL, outbreak in 2010. Mosquitoes were maintained at extrinsic incubation temperatures of 28 or 30 degrees C for an incubation period of 14 d. Vector competence was assessed using rates of infection (percent with virus-positive bodies), dissemination (percent infected with virus-positive legs), and transmission (percent infected with virus-positive saliva). No significant differences were observed in rates of infection or dissemination between Ae. aegypti or Ae. albopictus at either extrinsic incubation temperature. Transmission was observed only at 28 degrees C in both Ae. aegypti (Key West) and Ae. albopictus. The assessment of local mosquito populations for their DENV vector competence is essential and will aid mosquito control operators interested in pinpointing specific vector populations for control. The extent to which vector competence is affected by seasonal changes in temperature is discussed and provides baseline risk assessment data to mosquito control agencies.
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Complex regional pain syndrome following immunisation.
Arch. Dis. Child.
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Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) is a clinical syndrome that affects one or more extremities and is characterised by persistent pain disproportionate to any inciting event, and at least one sign of autonomic dysfunction in the affected limb(s). The pathogenesis of this syndrome is poorly understood, but its onset is often precipitated by a physical injury, such as minor trauma, fracture, infection or a surgical procedure. In the literature, there are reports of CRPS-1 following immunisation with rubella and hepatitis B vaccines. Here we present a case series of CRPS-1 following immunisation in adolescents, with either diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (1 case), or human papillomavirus vaccines (4 cases). Enhanced awareness of this syndrome and its potential to occur following immunisation in the paediatric population is vital to the prompt and effective management of this condition.
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Reliability and diagnostic performance of CT imaging criteria in the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.
PLoS ONE
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Abnormalities on CT imaging may contribute to the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Recently, an expert consensus case definition (CCD) and set of imaging criteria for diagnosing basal meningeal enhancement (BME) have been proposed. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and reliability of these in a prospective cohort of adult meningitis patients.
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Effects of blood meal source on the reproduction of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).
J. Vector Ecol.
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Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were fed blood meals from a live chicken (LC), chicken blood in Alsevers (AC) solution, defibrinated bovine blood (DB), or bovine blood in citrate (CB) and incubated at 28° C. The effects of different blood meal sources were evaluated with respect to rates of blood feeding and reproduction (i.e., fecundity and fertility) over two gonotrophic cycles. Mosquitoes that fed on the first blood meal were subjected to a second blood meal as follows (first blood meal / second blood meal): LC/LC, LC/DB, DB/DB, CB/CB, AC/AC. Fecundity and fertility of Cx. p. quinquefasciatus were significantly (P < 0.05) greater in mosquitoes fed LC blood; however, fecundity and fertility in different treatment groups varied by gonotrophic cycle. These results contribute to our understanding of the impact of blood meal source on feeding and reproduction in Cx. p. quinquefasciatus. The potential impacts of blood meal source on virus transmission experiments are discussed.
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Writing instruction in elementary classrooms: making the connection to Common Core State Standards.
Semin Speech Lang
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This study used a survey of primary general education teachers to examine the frequency of writing instructional activities and the genres composed most frequently by students in these classrooms. Surveys were completed by first-, third-, and fifth-grade general education teachers, with questions addressing writing activities, writing instruction, instructional strategies, writing genres, and writing environment. Means of teacher responses were calculated for each grade level to determine how many days per school year each activity occurred. To better understand the changes that occur in writing instructional practices and genres across grade levels, these means are compared and shifts are discussed. Results of this study revealed that the frequency of writing instructional practices and genre usage change across the primary grade levels, but that great variation also exists among teachers at each grade level. Links among the survey results, the Common Core State Standards for writing, and best practices for writing instruction will be made.
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Relationships between infection, dissemination, and transmission of West Nile virus RNA in Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).
J. Med. Entomol.
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Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say fed blood containing 6.8 +/- 0.3 logs (mean +/- SE) plaque-forming units of West Nile virus (WNV)/ml were maintained at 28 degrees C for incubation periods (IP) of 7, 14, or 21 d. Several attributes of vector competence were determined at each IP using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to estimate plaque forming unit equivalents including: infection rate (WNV-positive abdomens), dissemination rate (WNV-positive legs or thoraces), combined dissemination rate (WNV-positive legs and thoraces), transmission rate (WNV-positive saliva), and WNV titers in abdomens, legs, thoraces, and saliva. Each rate increased or was equivalent with increasing IP. Mosquitoes transmitting WNV in saliva also had significantly higher IP-dependent WNV titers in abdomens, legs, and thoraces. Titers of WNV in abdomens were significantly correlated with titers in legs and thoraces, but the degree of association changed with IP. However, titers of abdomens, legs, and thoraces were not correlated with WNV presence or titer in the saliva. The results show that WNV presence or titer in the saliva of infected Cx. p. quinquefasciatus was not directly influenced by processes involved in WNV replication in other tissues. The processes controlling midgut infection and escape are, in part, independent from the infection processes in other tissues. The relationship between infection, dissemination, and transmission varied over time. The infection and replication of WNV in different tissues is likely influenced by different barriers encountered during the extrinsic incubation period. The significance of these observations for understanding vector competence is discussed.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.