JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Multiple Polyploidy Events in the Early Radiation of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Legumes.
Mol. Biol. Evol.
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Unresolved questions about evolution of the large and diverse legume family include the timing of polyploidy (whole-genome duplication; WGDs) relative to the origin of the major lineages within the Fabaceae and to the origin of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Previous work has established that a WGD affects most lineages in the Papilionoideae and occurred sometime after the divergence of the papilionoid and mimosoid clades, but the exact timing has been unknown. The history of WGD has also not been established for legume lineages outside the Papilionoideae. We investigated the presence and timing of WGDs in the legumes by querying thousands of phylogenetic trees constructed from transcriptome and genome data from 20 diverse legumes and 17 outgroup species. The timing of duplications in the gene trees indicates that the papilionoid WGD occurred in the common ancestor of all papilionoids. The earliest diverging lineages of the Papilionoideae include both nodulating taxa, such as the genistoids (e.g., lupin), dalbergioids (e.g., peanut), phaseoloids (e.g., beans), and galegoids (=Hologalegina, e.g., clovers), and clades with nonnodulating taxa including Xanthocercis and Cladrastis (evaluated in this study). We also found evidence for several independent WGDs near the base of other major legume lineages, including the Mimosoideae-Cassiinae-Caesalpinieae (MCC), Detarieae, and Cercideae clades. Nodulation is found in the MCC and papilionoid clades, both of which experienced ancestral WGDs. However, there are numerous nonnodulating lineages in both clades, making it unclear whether the phylogenetic distribution of nodulation is due to independent gains or a single origin followed by multiple losses.
Related JoVE Video
Comprehensive characterization and RNA-Seq profiling of the HD-Zip transcription factor family in soybean (Glycine max) during dehydration and salt stress.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-Zip) transcription factor family is one of the largest plant specific superfamilies, and includes genes with roles in modulation of plant growth and response to environmental stresses. Many HD-Zip genes are characterized in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and members of the family are being investigated for abiotic stress responses in rice (Oryza sativa), maize (Zea mays), poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and cucumber (Cucmis sativus). Findings in these species suggest HD-Zip genes as high priority candidates for crop improvement.
Related JoVE Video
A roadmap for functional structural variants in the soybean genome.
G3 (Bethesda)
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Gene structural variation (SV) has recently emerged as a key genetic mechanism underlying several important phenotypic traits in crop species. We screened a panel of 41 soybean (Glycine max) accessions serving as parents in a soybean nested association mapping population for deletions and duplications in more than 53,000 gene models. Array hybridization and whole genome resequencing methods were used as complementary technologies to identify SV in 1528 genes, or approximately 2.8%, of the soybean gene models. Although SV occurs throughout the genome, SV enrichment was noted in families of biotic defense response genes. Among accessions, SV was nearly eightfold less frequent for gene models that have retained paralogs since the last whole genome duplication event, compared with genes that have not retained paralogs. Increases in gene copy number, similar to that described at the Rhg1 resistance locus, account for approximately one-fourth of the genic SV events. This assessment of soybean SV occurrence presents a target list of genes potentially responsible for rapidly evolving and/or adaptive traits.
Related JoVE Video
A reference genome for common bean and genome-wide analysis of dual domestications.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important grain legume for human consumption and has a role in sustainable agriculture owing to its ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. We assembled 473 Mb of the 587-Mb genome and genetically anchored 98% of this sequence in 11 chromosome-scale pseudomolecules. We compared the genome for the common bean against the soybean genome to find changes in soybean resulting from polyploidy. Using resequencing of 60 wild individuals and 100 landraces from the genetically differentiated Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools, we confirmed 2 independent domestications from genetic pools that diverged before human colonization. Less than 10% of the 74 Mb of sequence putatively involved in domestication was shared by the two domestication events. We identified a set of genes linked with increased leaf and seed size and combined these results with quantitative trait locus data from Mesoamerican cultivars. Genes affected by domestication may be useful for genomics-enabled crop improvement.
Related JoVE Video
Comprehensive transcriptome assembly of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using sanger and next generation sequencing platforms: development and applications.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A comprehensive transcriptome assembly of chickpea has been developed using 134.95 million Illumina single-end reads, 7.12 million single-end FLX/454 reads and 139,214 Sanger expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from >17 genotypes. This hybrid transcriptome assembly, referred to as Cicer arietinumTranscriptome Assembly version 2 (CaTA v2, available at http://data.comparative-legumes.org/transcriptomes/cicar/lista_cicar-201201), comprising 46,369 transcript assembly contigs (TACs) has an N50 length of 1,726 bp and a maximum contig size of 15,644 bp. Putative functions were determined for 32,869 (70.8%) of the TACs and gene ontology assignments were determined for 21,471 (46.3%). The new transcriptome assembly was compared with the previously available chickpea transcriptome assemblies as well as to the chickpea genome. Comparative analysis of CaTA v2 against transcriptomes of three legumes - Medicago, soybean and common bean, resulted in 27,771 TACs common to all three legumes indicating strong conservation of genes across legumes. CaTA v2 was also used for identification of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and intron spanning regions (ISRs) for developing molecular markers. ISRs were identified by aligning TACs to the Medicago genome, and their putative mapping positions at chromosomal level were identified using transcript map of chickpea. Primer pairs were designed for 4,990 ISRs, each representing a single contig for which predicted positions are inferred and distributed across eight linkage groups. A subset of randomly selected ISRs representing all eight chickpea linkage groups were validated on five chickpea genotypes and showed 20% polymorphism with average polymorphic information content (PIC) of 0.27. In summary, the hybrid transcriptome assembly developed and novel markers identified can be used for a variety of applications such as gene discovery, marker-trait association, diversity analysis etc., to advance genetics research and breeding applications in chickpea and other related legumes.
Related JoVE Video
The model legume genomes.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The primary model legumes to date have been Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. Both species are tractable both genetically and in the greenhouse, and for both, substantial sets of tools and resources for molecular genetic research have been assembled. As sequencing costs have declined, however, additional legume genomes have been sequenced, and the funding available to crops such as soybean has enabled these to be developed to the status of genetic models in their own right. This chapter, therefore, describes a broader set of model species in the legumes, and discusses similarities and differences between the genomes sequenced to date, as well as computational resources available for various legume species. Genome structural characteristics in, for example, Medicago truncatula and Glycine max, can have large impacts on the kinds of functional genomic research that may be carried out in these species. Both of these genomes have substantial redundancy for many gene families, but the nature of the redundancy is different in the two genomes-with the redundancy typically being in the form of local gene duplications in Medicago, and in whole-genome-duplication-derived duplications in Glycine. Similar considerations (about gene environments and genome structure) will likely need to be taken into account for any model or crop species.
Related JoVE Video
Draft genome sequence of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) provides a resource for trait improvement.
Nat. Biotechnol.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is the second most widely grown legume crop after soybean, accounting for a substantial proportion of human dietary nitrogen intake and playing a crucial role in food security in developing countries. We report the ?738-Mb draft whole genome shotgun sequence of CDC Frontier, a kabuli chickpea variety, which contains an estimated 28,269 genes. Resequencing and analysis of 90 cultivated and wild genotypes from ten countries identifies targets of both breeding-associated genetic sweeps and breeding-associated balancing selection. Candidate genes for disease resistance and agronomic traits are highlighted, including traits that distinguish the two main market classes of cultivated chickpea--desi and kabuli. These data comprise a resource for chickpea improvement through molecular breeding and provide insights into both genome diversity and domestication.
Related JoVE Video
Chromosome visualization tool: a whole genome viewer.
Int J Plant Genomics
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
CViT (chromosome visualization tool) is a Perl utility for quickly generating images of features on a whole genome at once. It reads GFF3-formated data representing chromosomes (linkage groups or pseudomolecules) and sets of features on those chromosomes. It can display features on any chromosomal unit system, including genetic (centimorgan), cytological (centiMcClintock), and DNA unit (base-pair) coordinates. CViT has been used to track sequencing progress (status of genome sequencing, location and number of gaps), to visualize BLAST hits on a whole genome view, to associate maps with one another, to locate regions of repeat densities to display syntenic regions, and to visualize centromeres and knobs on chromosomes.
Related JoVE Video
Changes in twelve homoeologous genomic regions in soybean following three rounds of polyploidy.
Plant Cell
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
With the advent of high-throughput sequencing, the availability of genomic sequence for comparative genomics is increasing exponentially. Numerous completed plant genome sequences enable characterization of patterns of the retention and evolution of genes within gene families due to multiple polyploidy events, gene loss and fractionation, and differential evolutionary pressures over time and across different gene families. In this report, we trace the changes that have occurred in 12 surviving homoeologous genomic regions from three rounds of polyploidy that contributed to the current Glycine max genome: a genome triplication before the origin of the rosids (~130 to 240 million years ago), a genome duplication early in the legumes (~58 million years ago), and a duplication in the Glycine lineage (~13 million years ago). Patterns of gene retention following the genome triplication event generally support predictions of the Gene Balance Hypothesis. Finally, we find that genes in networks with a high level of connectivity are more strongly conserved than those with low connectivity and that the enrichment of these highly connected genes in the 12 highly conserved homoeologous segments may in part explain their retention over more than 100 million years and repeated polyploidy events.
Related JoVE Video
The Medicago genome provides insight into the evolution of rhizobial symbioses.
Nevin D Young, Frédéric Debellé, Giles E D Oldroyd, Rene Geurts, Steven B Cannon, Michael K Udvardi, Vagner A Benedito, Klaus F X Mayer, Jérôme Gouzy, Heiko Schoof, Yves Van de Peer, Sebastian Proost, Douglas R Cook, Blake C Meyers, Manuel Spannagl, Foo Cheung, Stéphane De Mita, Vivek Krishnakumar, Heidrun Gundlach, Shiguo Zhou, Joann Mudge, Arvind K Bharti, Jeremy D Murray, Marina A Naoumkina, Benjamin Rosen, Kevin A T Silverstein, Haibao Tang, Stephane Rombauts, Patrick X Zhao, Peng Zhou, Valérie Barbe, Philippe Bardou, Michael Bechner, Arnaud Bellec, Anne Berger, Hélène Berges, Shelby Bidwell, Ton Bisseling, Nathalie Choisne, Arnaud Couloux, Roxanne Denny, Shweta Deshpande, Xinbin Dai, Jeff J Doyle, Anne-Marie Dudez, Andrew D Farmer, Stéphanie Fouteau, Carolien Franken, Chrystel Gibelin, John Gish, Steven Goldstein, Alvaro J González, Pamela J Green, Asis Hallab, Marijke Hartog, Axin Hua, Sean J Humphray, Dong-Hoon Jeong, Yi Jing, Anika Jöcker, Steve M Kenton, Dong-Jin Kim, Kathrin Klee, Hongshing Lai, Chunting Lang, Shaoping Lin, Simone L Macmil, Ghislaine Magdelenat, Lucy Matthews, Jamison McCorrison, Erin L Monaghan, Jeong-Hwan Mun, Fares Z Najar, Christine Nicholson, Céline Noirot, Majesta O'Bleness, Charles R Paule, Julie Poulain, Florent Prion, Baifang Qin, Chunmei Qu, Ernest F Retzel, Claire Riddle, Erika Sallet, Sylvie Samain, Nicolas Samson, Iryna Sanders, Olivier Saurat, Claude Scarpelli, Thomas Schiex, Béatrice Ségurens, Andrew J Severin, D Janine Sherrier, Ruihua Shi, Sarah Sims, Susan R Singer, Senjuti Sinharoy, Lieven Sterck, Agnès Viollet, Bing-Bing Wang, Keqin Wang, Mingyi Wang, Xiaohong Wang, Jens Warfsmann, Jean Weissenbach, Doug D White, Jim D White, Graham B Wiley, Patrick Wincker, Yanbo Xing, Limei Yang, Ziyun Yao, Fu Ying, Jixian Zhai, Liping Zhou, Antoine Zuber, Jean Dénarié, Richard A Dixon, Gregory D May, David C Schwartz, Jane Rogers, Francis Quetier, Christopher D Town, Bruce A Roe.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Legumes (Fabaceae or Leguminosae) are unique among cultivated plants for their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation with rhizobial bacteria, a process that takes place in a specialized structure known as the nodule. Legumes belong to one of the two main groups of eurosids, the Fabidae, which includes most species capable of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Legumes comprise several evolutionary lineages derived from a common ancestor 60 million years ago (Myr ago). Papilionoids are the largest clade, dating nearly to the origin of legumes and containing most cultivated species. Medicago truncatula is a long-established model for the study of legume biology. Here we describe the draft sequence of the M. truncatula euchromatin based on a recently completed BAC assembly supplemented with Illumina shotgun sequence, together capturing ?94% of all M. truncatula genes. A whole-genome duplication (WGD) approximately 58 Myr ago had a major role in shaping the M. truncatula genome and thereby contributed to the evolution of endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. Subsequent to the WGD, the M. truncatula genome experienced higher levels of rearrangement than two other sequenced legumes, Glycine max and Lotus japonicus. M. truncatula is a close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), a widely cultivated crop with limited genomics tools and complex autotetraploid genetics. As such, the M. truncatula genome sequence provides significant opportunities to expand alfalfas genomic toolbox.
Related JoVE Video
Large-scale transcriptome analysis in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), an orphan legume crop of the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa.
Plant Biotechnol. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important legume crop in the semi-arid regions of Asia and Africa. Gains in crop productivity have been low however, particularly because of biotic and abiotic stresses. To help enhance crop productivity using molecular breeding techniques, next generation sequencing technologies such as Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa were used to determine the sequence of most gene transcripts and to identify drought-responsive genes and gene-based molecular markers. A total of 103,215 tentative unique sequences (TUSs) have been produced from 435,018 Roche/454 reads and 21,491 Sanger expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Putative functions were determined for 49,437 (47.8%) of the TUSs, and gene ontology assignments were determined for 20,634 (41.7%) of the TUSs. Comparison of the chickpea TUSs with the Medicago truncatula genome assembly (Mt 3.5.1 build) resulted in 42,141 aligned TUSs with putative gene structures (including 39,281 predicted intron/splice junctions). Alignment of ?37 million Illumina/Solexa tags generated from drought-challenged root tissues of two chickpea genotypes against the TUSs identified 44,639 differentially expressed TUSs. The TUSs were also used to identify a diverse set of markers, including 728 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 495 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 387 conserved orthologous sequence (COS) markers, and 2088 intron-spanning region (ISR) markers. This resource will be useful for basic and applied research for genome analysis and crop improvement in chickpea.
Related JoVE Video
Defining the transcriptome assembly and its use for genome dynamics and transcriptome profiling studies in pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.).
DNA Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study reports generation of large-scale genomic resources for pigeonpea, a so-called orphan crop species of the semi-arid tropic regions. FLX/454 sequencing carried out on a normalized cDNA pool prepared from 31 tissues produced 494 353 short transcript reads (STRs). Cluster analysis of these STRs, together with 10 817 Sanger ESTs, resulted in a pigeonpea trancriptome assembly (CcTA) comprising of 127 754 tentative unique sequences (TUSs). Functional analysis of these TUSs highlights several active pathways and processes in the sampled tissues. Comparison of the CcTA with the soybean genome showed similarity to 10 857 and 16 367 soybean gene models (depending on alignment methods). Additionally, Illumina 1G sequencing was performed on Fusarium wilt (FW)- and sterility mosaic disease (SMD)-challenged root tissues of 10 resistant and susceptible genotypes. More than 160 million sequence tags were used to identify FW- and SMD-responsive genes. Sequence analysis of CcTA and the Illumina tags identified a large new set of markers for use in genetics and breeding, including 8137 simple sequence repeats, 12 141 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and 5845 intron-spanning regions. Genomic resources developed in this study should be useful for basic and applied research, not only for pigeonpea improvement but also for other related, agronomically important legumes.
Related JoVE Video
The clinical significance of the FUS-CREB3L2 translocation in low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma.
J Orthop Surg Res
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (LGFMS) is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm with a deceptively benign histological appearance. Local recurrences and metastases can manifest many years following excision. The FUS-CREB3L2 gene translocation, which occurs commonly in LGFMS, may be detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). We assessed the relationship between clinical outcome and translocation test result by both methods.
Related JoVE Video
Gene expression patterns are correlated with genomic and genic structure in soybean.
Genome
PUBLISHED: 01-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Studies have indicated that exon and intron size and intergenic distance are correlated with gene expression levels and expression breadth. Previous reports on these correlations in plants and animals have been conflicting. In this study, next-generation sequence data, which has been shown to be more sensitive than previous expression profiling technologies, were generated and analyzed from 14 tissues. Our results revealed a novel dichotomy. At the low expression level, an increase in expression breadth correlated with an increase in transcript size because of an increase in the number of exons and introns. No significant changes in intron or exon sizes were noted. Conversely, genes expressed at the intermediate to high expression levels displayed a decrease in transcript size as their expression breadth increased. This was due to smaller exons, with no significant change in the number of exons. Taking advantage of the known gene space of soybean, we evaluated the positioning of genes and found significant clustering of similarly expressed genes. Identifying the correlations between the physical parameters of individual genes could lead to uncovering the role of regulation owing to nucleotide composition, which might have potential impacts in discerning the role of the noncoding regions.
Related JoVE Video
Applying small-scale DNA signatures as an aid in assembling soybean chromosome sequences.
Adv Bioinformatics
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Previous work has established a genomic signature based on relative counts of the 16 possible dinucleotides. Until now, it has been generally accepted that the dinucleotide signature is characteristic of a genome and is relatively homogeneous across a genome. However, we found some local regions of the soybean genome with a signature differing widely from that of the rest of the genome. Those regions were mostly centromeric and pericentromeric, and enriched for repetitive sequences. We found that DNA binding energy also presented large-scale patterns across soybean chromosomes. These two patterns were helpful during assembly and quality control of soybean whole genome shotgun scaffold sequences into chromosome pseudomolecules.
Related JoVE Video
Evolutionary conservation, diversity and specificity of LTR-retrotransposons in flowering plants: insights from genome-wide analysis and multi-specific comparison.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 06-08-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The availability of complete or nearly complete genome sequences from several plant species permits detailed discovery and cross-species comparison of transposable elements (TEs) at the whole genome level. We initially investigated 510 long terminal repeat-retrotransposon (LTR-RT) families comprising 32370 elements in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Approximately 87% of these elements were located in recombination-suppressed pericentromeric regions, where the ratio (1.26) of solo LTRs to intact elements (S/I) is significantly lower than that of chromosome arms (1.62). Further analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between S/I and LTR sizes, indicating that larger LTRs facilitate solo LTR formation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed seven Copia and five Gypsy evolutionary lineages that were present before the divergence of eudicot and monocot species, but the scales and timeframes within which they proliferated vary dramatically across families, lineages and species, and notably, a Copia lineage has been lost in soybean. Analysis of the physical association of LTR-RTs with centromere satellite repeats identified two putative centromere retrotransposon (CR) families of soybean, which were grouped into the CR (e.g. CRR and CRM) lineage found in grasses, indicating that the functional specification of CR pre-dates the bifurcation of eudicots and monocots. However, a number of families of the CR lineage are not concentrated in centromeres, suggesting that their CR roles may now be defunct. Our data also suggest that the envelope-like genes in the putative Copia retrovirus-like family are probably derived from the Gypsy retrovirus-like lineage, and thus we propose the hypothesis of a single ancient origin of envelope-like genes in flowering plants.
Related JoVE Video
A fluorescence in situ hybridization system for karyotyping soybean.
Genetics
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The development of a universal soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) cytogenetic map that associates classical genetic linkage groups, molecular linkage groups, and a sequence-based physical map with the karyotype has been impeded due to the soybean chromosomes themselves, which are small and morphologically homogeneous. To overcome this obstacle, we screened soybean repetitive DNA to develop a cocktail of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes that could differentially label mitotic chromosomes in root tip preparations. We used genetically anchored BAC clones both to identify individual chromosomes in metaphase spreads and to complete a FISH-based karyotyping cocktail that permitted simultaneous identification of all 20 chromosome pairs. We applied these karyotyping tools to wild soybean, G. soja Sieb. and Zucc., which represents a large gene pool of potentially agronomically valuable traits. These studies led to the identification and characterization of a reciprocal chromosome translocation between chromosomes 11 and 13 in two accessions of wild soybean. The data confirm that this translocation is widespread in G. soja accessions and likely accounts for the semi-sterility found in some G. soja by G. max crosses.
Related JoVE Video
Polyploidy did not predate the evolution of nodulation in all legumes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Several lines of evidence indicate that polyploidy occurred by around 54 million years ago, early in the history of legume evolution, but it has not been known whether this event was confined to the papilionoid subfamily (Papilionoideae; e.g. beans, medics, lupins) or occurred earlier. Determining the timing of the polyploidy event is important for understanding whether polyploidy might have contributed to rapid diversification and radiation of the legumes near the origin of the family; and whether polyploidy might have provided genetic material that enabled the evolution of a novel organ, the nitrogen-fixing nodule. Although symbioses with nitrogen-fixing partners have evolved in several lineages in the rosid I clade, nodules are widespread only in legume taxa, being nearly universal in the papilionoids and in the mimosoid subfamily (e.g., mimosas, acacias)--which diverged from the papilionoid legumes around 58 million years ago, soon after the origin of the legumes.
Related JoVE Video
Complementary genetic and genomic approaches help characterize the linkage group I seed protein QTL in soybean.
BMC Plant Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The nutritional and economic value of many crops is effectively a function of seed protein and oil content. Insight into the genetic and molecular control mechanisms involved in the deposition of these constituents in the developing seed is needed to guide crop improvement. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) on Linkage Group I (LG I) of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) has a striking effect on seed protein content.
Related JoVE Video
RNA-Seq Atlas of Glycine max: a guide to the soybean transcriptome.
BMC Plant Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Next generation sequencing is transforming our understanding of transcriptomes. It can determine the expression level of transcripts with a dynamic range of over six orders of magnitude from multiple tissues, developmental stages or conditions. Patterns of gene expression provide insight into functions of genes with unknown annotation.
Related JoVE Video
Genome sequence of the palaeopolyploid soybean.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70% more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78% of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75% of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.
Related JoVE Video
High-throughput SNP discovery through deep resequencing of a reduced representation library to anchor and orient scaffolds in the soybean whole genome sequence.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The Soybean Consensus Map 4.0 facilitated the anchoring of 95.6% of the soybean whole genome sequence developed by the Joint Genome Institute, Department of Energy, but its marker density was only sufficient to properly orient 66% of the sequence scaffolds. The discovery and genetic mapping of more single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were needed to anchor and orient the remaining genome sequence. To that end, next generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping were combined to obtain a much higher resolution genetic map that could be used to anchor and orient most of the remaining sequence and to help validate the integrity of the existing scaffold builds.
Related JoVE Video
SoyBase, the USDA-ARS soybean genetics and genomics database.
Nucleic Acids Res.
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
SoyBase, the USDA-ARS soybean genetic database, is a comprehensive repository for professionally curated genetics, genomics and related data resources for soybean. SoyBase contains the most current genetic, physical and genomic sequence maps integrated with qualitative and quantitative traits. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) represent more than 18 years of QTL mapping of more than 90 unique traits. SoyBase also contains the well-annotated Williams 82 genomic sequence and associated data mining tools. The genetic and sequence views of the soybean chromosomes and the extensive data on traits and phenotypes are extensively interlinked. This allows entry to the database using almost any kind of available information, such as genetic map symbols, soybean gene names or phenotypic traits. SoyBase is the repository for controlled vocabularies for soybean growth, development and trait terms, which are also linked to the more general plant ontologies. SoyBase can be accessed at http://soybase.org.
Related JoVE Video
A nomadic subtelomeric disease resistance gene cluster in common bean.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The B4 resistance (R) gene cluster is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris [Pv]). It is located in a peculiar genomic environment in the subtelomeric region of the short arm of chromosome 4, adjacent to two heterochromatic blocks (knobs). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-Coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich-Repeat (CNL). Conserved microsynteny was observed between the Pv B4 locus and corresponding regions of Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus in chromosomes Mt6 and Lj2, respectively. The notable exception was the CNL sequences, which were completely absent in these regions. The origin of the Pv B4-CNL sequences was investigated through phylogenetic analysis, which reveals that, in the Pv genome, paralogous CNL genes are shared among nonhomologous chromosomes (4 and 11). Together, our results suggest that Pv B4-CNL was derived from CNL sequences from another cluster, the Co-2 cluster, through an ectopic recombination event. Integration of the soybean (Glycine max) genome data enables us to date more precisely this event and also to infer that a single CNL moved from the Co-2 to the B4 cluster. Moreover, we identified a new 528-bp satellite repeat, referred to as khipu, specific to the Phaseolus genus, present both between B4-CNL sequences and in the two knobs identified at the B4 R gene cluster. The khipu repeat is present on most chromosomal termini, indicating the existence of frequent ectopic recombination events in Pv subtelomeric regions. Our results highlight the importance of ectopic recombination in R gene evolution.
Related JoVE Video
Granular cell tumours: a rare entity in the musculoskeletal system.
Sarcoma
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Granular Cell Tumours are rare mesenchymal soft tissue tumours that arise throughout the body and are believed to be of neural origin. They often present as asymptomatic, slow-growing, benign, solitary lesions but may be multifocal. 1-2% of cases are malignant and can metastasise. Described series in the literature are sparse. We identified eleven cases in ten patients treated surgically and followed-up for a period of over 6 years in our regional bone and soft tissue tumour centre. Five tumours were located in the lower limb, four in the upper limb, and two in the trunk. Mean patient age was 31.2 years (range 8-55 years). Excision was complete in one case, marginal in five cases and intralesional in five cases. No patients required postoperative adjuvant treatment. Mean follow-up was 19.3 months (range 1-37 months). One case was multifocal, but there were no cases of local recurrence or malignancy. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the classical granular cell tumour features in all cases. We believe this case series to be the largest of its type in patients presenting to an orthopaedic soft tissue tumour unit. We present our findings and correlate them with findings of other series in the literature.
Related JoVE Video
Evolutionary genomics of LysM genes in land plants.
BMC Evol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The ubiquitous LysM motif recognizes peptidoglycan, chitooligosaccharides (chitin) and, presumably, other structurally-related oligosaccharides. LysM-containing proteins were first shown to be involved in bacterial cell wall degradation and, more recently, were implicated in perceiving chitin (one of the established pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and lipo-chitin (nodulation factors) in flowering plants. However, the majority of LysM genes in plants remain functionally uncharacterized and the evolutionary history of complex LysM genes remains elusive.
Related JoVE Video
Integrating microarray analysis and the soybean genome to understand the soybeans iron deficiency response.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Soybeans grown in the upper Midwestern United States often suffer from iron deficiency chlorosis, which results in yield loss at the end of the season. To better understand the effect of iron availability on soybean yield, we identified genes in two near isogenic lines with changes in expression patterns when plants were grown in iron sufficient and iron deficient conditions.
Related JoVE Video
An analysis of synteny of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago sheds new light on the structure, stability and evolution of legume genomes.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Most agriculturally important legumes fall within two sub-clades of the Papilionoid legumes: the Phaseoloids and Galegoids, which diverged about 50 Mya. The Phaseoloids are mostly tropical and include crops such as common bean and soybean. The Galegoids are mostly temperate and include clover, fava bean and the model legumes Lotus and Medicago (both with substantially sequenced genomes). In contrast, peanut (Arachis hypogaea) falls in the Dalbergioid clade which is more basal in its divergence within the Papilionoids. The aim of this work was to integrate the genetic map of Arachis with Lotus and Medicago and improve our understanding of the Arachis genome and legume genomes in general. To do this we placed on the Arachis map, comparative anchor markers defined using a previously described bioinformatics pipeline. Also we investigated the possible role of transposons in the patterns of synteny that were observed.
Related JoVE Video
Genome-wide characterization of nonreference transposons reveals evolutionary propensities of transposons in soybean.
Plant Cell
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Preferential accumulation of transposable elements (TEs), particularly long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), in recombination-suppressed pericentromeric regions seems to be a general pattern of TE distribution in flowering plants. However, whether such a pattern was formed primarily by preferential TE insertions into pericentromeric regions or by selection against TE insertions into euchromatin remains obscure. We recently investigated TE insertions in 31 resequenced wild and cultivated soybean (Glycine max) genomes and detected 34,154 unique nonreference TE insertions mappable to the reference genome. Our data revealed consistent distribution patterns of the nonreference LTR-RT insertions and those present in the reference genome, whereas the distribution patterns of the nonreference DNA TE insertions and the accumulated ones were significantly different. The densities of the nonreference LTR-RT insertions were found to negatively correlate with the rates of local genetic recombination, but no significant correlation between the densities of nonreference DNA TE insertions and the rates of local genetic recombination was detected. These observations suggest that distinct insertional preferences were primary factors that resulted in different levels of effectiveness of purifying selection, perhaps as an effect of local genomic features, such as recombination rates and gene densities that reshaped the distribution patterns of LTR-RTs and DNA TEs in soybean.
Related JoVE Video
Evolutionary and comparative analyses of the soybean genome.
Breed. Sci.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The soybean genome assembly has been available since the end of 2008. Significant features of the genome include large, gene-poor, repeat-dense pericentromeric regions, spanning roughly 57% of the genome sequence; a relatively large genome size of ~1.15 billion bases; remnants of a genome duplication that occurred ~13 million years ago (Mya); and fainter remnants of older polyploidies that occurred ~58 Mya and >130 Mya. The genome sequence has been used to identify the genetic basis for numerous traits, including disease resistance, nutritional characteristics, and developmental features. The genome sequence has provided a scaffold for placement of many genomic feature elements, both from within soybean and from related species. These may be accessed at several websites, including http://www.phytozome.net, http://soybase.org, http://comparative-legumes.org, and http://www.legumebase.brc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp. The taxonomic position of soybean in the Phaseoleae tribe of the legumes means that there are approximately two dozen other beans and relatives that have undergone independent domestication, and which may have traits that will be useful for transfer to soybean. Methods of translating information between species in the Phaseoleae range from design of markers for marker assisted selection, to transformation with Agrobacterium or with other experimental transformation methods.
Related JoVE Video
Evolution of a complex disease resistance gene cluster in diploid Phaseolus and tetraploid Glycine.
Plant Physiol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We used a comparative genomics approach to investigate the evolution of a complex nucleotide-binding (NB)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene cluster found in soybean (Glycine max) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) that is associated with several disease resistance (R) genes of known function, including Rpg1b (for Resistance to Pseudomonas glycinea1b), an R gene effective against specific races of bacterial blight. Analysis of domains revealed that the amino-terminal coiled-coil (CC) domain, central nucleotide-binding domain (NB-ARC [for APAF1, Resistance genes, and CED4]), and carboxyl-terminal LRR domain have undergone distinct evolutionary paths. Sequence exchanges within the NB-ARC domain were rare. In contrast, interparalogue exchanges involving the CC and LRR domains were common, consistent with both of these regions coevolving with pathogens. Residues under positive selection were overrepresented within the predicted solvent-exposed face of the LRR domain, although several also were detected within the CC and NB-ARC domains. Superimposition of these latter residues onto predicted tertiary structures revealed that the majority are located on the surface, suggestive of a role in interactions with other domains or proteins. Following polyploidy in the Glycine lineage, NB-LRR genes have been preferentially lost from one of the duplicated chromosomes (homeologues found in soybean), and there has been partitioning of NB-LRR clades between the two homeologues. The single orthologous region in common bean contains approximately the same number of paralogues as found in the two soybean homeologues combined. We conclude that while polyploidization in Glycine has not driven a stable increase in family size for NB-LRR genes, it has generated two recombinationally isolated clusters, one of which appears to be in the process of decay.
Related JoVE Video
A comprehensive transcriptome assembly of Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) using sanger and second-generation sequencing platforms.
Mol Plant
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
A comprehensive transcriptome assembly for pigeonpea has been developed by analyzing 128.9 million short Illumina GA IIx single end reads, 2.19 million single end FLX/454 reads, and 18?353 Sanger expressed sequenced tags from more than 16 genotypes. The resultant transcriptome assembly, referred to as CcTA v2, comprised 21?434 transcript assembly contigs (TACs) with an N50 of 1510?bp, the largest one being ~8?kb. Of the 21?434 TACs, 16?622 (77.5%) could be mapped on to the soybean genome build 1.0.9 under fairly stringent alignment parameters. Based on knowledge of intron junctions, 10?009 primer pairs were designed from 5033 TACs for amplifying intron spanning regions (ISRs). By using in silico mapping of BAC-end-derived SSR loci of pigeonpea on the soybean genome as a reference, putative mapping positions at the chromosome level were predicted for 6284 ISR markers, covering all 11 pigeonpea chromosomes. A subset of 128 ISR markers were analyzed on a set of eight genotypes. While 116 markers were validated, 70 markers showed one to three alleles, with an average of 0.16 polymorphism information content (PIC) value. In summary, the CcTA v2 transcript assembly and ISR markers will serve as a useful resource to accelerate genetic research and breeding applications in pigeonpea.
Related JoVE Video
Pericentromeric effects shape the patterns of divergence, retention, and expression of duplicated genes in the paleopolyploid soybean.
Plant Cell
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The evolutionary forces that govern the divergence and retention of duplicated genes in polyploids are poorly understood. In this study, we first investigated the rates of nonsynonymous substitution (Ka) and the rates of synonymous substitution (Ks) for a nearly complete set of genes in the paleopolyploid soybean (Glycine max) by comparing the orthologs between soybean and its progenitor species Glycine soja and then compared the patterns of gene divergence and expression between pericentromeric regions and chromosomal arms in different gene categories. Our results reveal strong associations between duplication status and Ka and gene expression levels and overall low Ks and low levels of gene expression in pericentromeric regions. It is theorized that deleterious mutations can easily accumulate in recombination-suppressed regions, because of Hill-Robertson effects. Intriguingly, the genes in pericentromeric regions-the cold spots for meiotic recombination in soybean-showed significantly lower Ka and higher levels of expression than their homoeologs in chromosomal arms. This asymmetric evolution of two members of individual whole genome duplication (WGD)-derived gene pairs, echoing the biased accumulation of singletons in pericentromeric regions, suggests that distinct genomic features between the two distinct chromatin types are important determinants shaping the patterns of divergence and retention of WGD-derived genes.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.