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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Out of the frying pan? Streamlining the ethics review process of multisite qualitative research projects.
Aust Health Rev
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2013
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This paper describes the ethics approval processes for two multicentre, nationwide, qualitative health service research projects. The paper explains that the advent of the National Ethics Application Form has brought many improvements, but that attendant processes put in place at local health network and Human Research Ethics Committee levels may have become significantly more complicated, particularly for innovative qualitative research projects. The paper raises several questions based on its analysis of ethics application processes currently in place. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC? The complexity of multicentre research ethics applications for research in health services has been addressed by the introduction of the National Ethics Application Form. Uptake of the form across the countrys human research ethics committees has been uneven. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD? This paper adds detailed insight into the ethics application process as it is currently enacted across the country. The paper details this process with reference to difficulties faced by multisite and qualitative studies in negotiating access to research sites, ethics committees relative unfamiliarity with qualitative research , and apparent tensions between harmonisation and local sites autonomy in approving research. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTITIONERS? Practitioners aiming to engage in research need to be aware that ethics approval takes place in an uneven procedural landscape, made up of variable levels of ethics approval harmonization and intricate governance or site-specific assessment processes.
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What do patients and relatives know about problems and failures in care?
BMJ Qual Saf
PUBLISHED: 12-16-2011
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To understand what patients and family members know about problems and failures in healthcare.
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What prevents incident disclosure, and what can be done to promote it?
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2011
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Adverse-event incident disclosure is gaining international attention as being central to incident management, practice improvement, and public engagement, but those charged with its execution are experiencing barriers. Findings have emerged from two large studies: an evaluation of the 2006-2008 Australian Open Disclosure Pilot, and a 2009-2010 study of patients and relatives views on actual disclosures. Clinicians and patients interviewed in depth suggest that open disclosure communication has been prevented by a range of uncertainties, fears, and doubts.
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Patients and family members views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 07-27-2011
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To investigate patients and family members perceptions and experiences of disclosure of healthcare incidents and to derive principles of effective disclosure.
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Lessons learned from measuring safety culture: an Australian case study.
Midwifery
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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adverse events in maternity care are relatively common but often avoidable. International patient safety strategies advocate measuring safety culture as a strategy to improve patient safety. Evidence suggests it is necessary to fully understand the safety culture of an organisation to make improvements to patient safety.
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Anatomy of an incident disclosure: the importance of dialogue.
Jt Comm J Qual Patient Saf
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Disclosure of health care incidents to patients and family members, as an ethical imperative, is becoming increasingly prevalent. The experiences of a woman whose husband died forms the basis for a case study of how she and her family and friends were able to renegotiate clinicians understandings of what had gone wrong and influence their views of what needed to be done in response.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.