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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Ocular myasthenia gravis: controversies and updates.
Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2014
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The majority of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) initially present with ocular symptoms. An unresolved question is whether there are clinical features at onset to guide clinicians to predict an individual patient's conversion risk from ocular MG (OMG) to generalized disease, or "secondary generalized MG" (SGMG), that is, a prognostic model. In light of the emerging theory that early corticosteroids may have a risk-modifying effect, the factors associated with secondary SGMG previously reported should be revisited. Studies showing potential risk-modifying effects of corticosteroids are useful, though flawed, owing to the heterogeneous retrospective studies and methods of reporting. Updates on other potential immunosuppressive agents are also discussed. Thymectomy in OMG has been recently reported in a few studies to be useful. MG associated with antibodies to muscle-specific kinase, usually associated with severe generalized MG, can cause a pure OMG syndrome. Recent serological developments in seronegative patients have also revealed antibodies to clustered anti-acetylcholine receptor and lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4.
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Isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament.
J Neurosurg Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2014
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Only 6 cases of isolated unilateral rupture of the alar ligament have been previously reported. The authors report a new case and review the literature, morbid anatomy, and pathogenesis of this rare injury. The patient in their case, a 9-year-old girl, fell head first from a height of 5 feet off the ground. She presented with neck pain, a leftward head tilt, and severe limitation of right rotation, extension, and right lateral flexion of the neck. Plain radiographs and CT revealed no fracture but a shift of the dens toward the right lateral mass of C-1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed signal hyperintensity within the left dens-atlas space on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences and interruption of the expected dark signal representing the left alar ligament, suggestive of its rupture. After 12 weeks of immobilization in a Guilford brace, MRI showed lessened dens deviation, and the patient attained full and painless neck motion. Including the patient in this case, the 7 patients with this injury were between 5 and 21 years old, sustained the injury in traffic accidents or falls, presented with marked neck pain, and were treated with external immobilization. All patients had good clinical outcome. The mechanism of injury is hyperflexion with rotation. Isolated unilateral alar ligament rupture is a diagnosis made by excluding associated fracture, dislocation, or disruption of other major ligamentous structures in the craniovertebral junction. CT and MRI are essential in establishing the diagnosis. External immobilization is adequate treatment.
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Traumatic rupture of the neurocentral synchondrosis of the axis in a child.
J Neurosurg Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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The authors report the first case of unilateral traumatic rupture of the C-2 neurocentral synchondrosis. A 26-month-old child was in a vehicular collision that caused his head to be rotated sharply to the left with the neck flexed. He had severe neck pain but was neurologically normal. Computerized tomography scanning showed rupture of the left C-2 neurocentral synchondrosis, a right C-2 pars interarticularis fracture, and anterior angulation of C-2 on C-3. The neck injury was unrecognized until postinjury Day 9 when an MRI study showed a tear of the posterior longitudinal ligament at C2-3 and separation of the C-2 body from the inferior anular epiphysis. A second CT showed widening of the synchondrosis fracture, increased angulation of C-2 on C-3, and distraction of the right C-2 pars fracture. The mechanism of the neurocentral synchondrosis fracture is thought to be hyperflexion-axial loading combined with leftward rotation, which provided the lateral force that overcame the cartilaginous synchondrosis and extruded the lateral mass. The patient underwent open reduction and posterior fusion of C1-3, and was maintained in a halo jacket for 4 months, when CT scans demonstrated solid C1-C3 fusion and ossification of the injured synchondrosis. Unilateral traumatic rupture of the C-2 neurocentral synchondrosis is one component of several injuries involving C-2 sustained before synchondrosis closure. The resulting C2-3 relationship is highly unstable. Reduction and C1-C3 fusion are necessary in patients with significant displacement of the adjacent bony units.
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Innervation of the brain, intracerebral Schwann cells and intracerebral and intraventricular schwannomas.
Childs Nerv Syst
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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The cerebral vasculature and the choroid plexus are innervated by peripheral nerves. The anatomy of the vascular supply to the brain and its related perivascular nerves is reviewed. Intracerebral and intraventricular schwannomas most likely come from neoplastic transformation of Schwann cells investing the perivascular nerves and nerves within the choroid plexus.
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Pituitary apoplexy initially mistaken for bacterial meningitis.
BMJ Case Rep
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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We presented a case of a 62-year-old man whose initial clinical picture was suggestive of bacterial meningitis, but instead had pituitary apoplexy. We highlighted how pituitary apoplexy can mimic bacterial meningitis, learning points on how clinical assessment can aid earlier diagnosis and the importance of considering this differential diagnosis, particularly with the associated morbidity and mortality if missed.
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The clinical validity of the spontaneous retinal venous pulsation.
J Neuroophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2013
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The validity of the clinical dictum "the presence of spontaneous retinal venous pulsation (SVP) excludes raised intracranial pressure" has not been previously tested. We set out to determine the specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) of the presence of SVP to indicate normal intracranial pressure (ICP) in a routine clinical setting.
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Programming jammed Codman Hakim programmable valves: study of an explanted valve and successful programming in a patient.
J Neurosurg Pediatr
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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Malfunction of a Codman Hakim programmable valve due to jamming of its programmable component may necessitate shunt revision. The authors report a method for programming jammed Codman Hakim programmable valves by using a Strata II magnet and additional neodymium magnets. The programming method was derived after studying a jammed valve in the laboratory that was explanted from an 10-year-old boy with a history of fourth ventricle ependymoma. Programming the explanted valve with a Codman programmer failed, but rotating a Strata II magnet above the valve resulted in rotation of the spiral cam in the valve. It was found that the Strata II magnet could be used to program the jammed valve by rotating the magnet 90° or multiples of 90° above the valve. The strength of the magnetic field of the Strata II magnet was able to be increased by putting neodymium magnets on it. The programming method was then successfully used in a patient with a jammed Codman Hakim programmable valve. After successful programming using this method, clinical and radiological follow-up of the patient was advised.
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The structure of the SBP-Tag-streptavidin complex reveals a novel helical scaffold bridging binding pockets on separate subunits.
Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2013
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The 38-residue SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin more tightly (K(d) -/= 2.5-4.9 nM) than most if not all other known peptide sequences. Crystallographic analysis at 1.75 Å resolution shows that the SBP-Tag binds to streptavidin in an unprecedented manner by simultaneously interacting with biotin-binding pockets from two separate subunits. An N-terminal HVV peptide sequence (residues 12-14) and a C-terminal HPQ sequence (residues 31-33) form the bulk of the direct interactions between the SBP-Tag and the two biotin-binding pockets. Surprisingly, most of the peptide spanning these two sites (residues 17-28) adopts a regular ?-helical structure that projects three leucine side chains into a groove formed at the interface between two streptavidin protomers. The crystal structure shows that residues 1-10 and 35-38 of the original SBP-Tag identified through in vitro selection and deletion analysis do not appear to contact streptavidin and thus may not be important for binding. A 25-residue peptide comprising residues 11-34 (SBP-Tag2) was synthesized and shown using surface plasmon resonance to bind streptavidin with very similar affinity and kinetics when compared with the SBP-Tag. The SBP-Tag2 was also added to the C-terminus of ?-lactamase and was shown to be just as effective as the full-length SBP-Tag in affinity purification. These results validate the molecular structure of the SBP-Tag-streptavidin complex and establish a minimal bivalent streptavidin-binding tag from which further rational design and optimization can proceed.
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Structure-guided design of an engineered streptavidin with reusability to purify streptavidin-binding peptide tagged proteins or biotinylated proteins.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Development of a high-affinity streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) tag allows the tagged recombinant proteins to be affinity purified using the streptavidin matrix without the need of biotinylation. The major limitation of this powerful technology is the requirement to use biotin to elute the SBP-tagged proteins from the streptavidin matrix. Tight biotin binding by streptavidin essentially allows the matrix to be used only once. To address this problem, differences in interactions of biotin and SBP with streptavidin were explored. Loop3-4 which serves as a mobile lid for the biotin binding pocket in streptavidin is in the closed state with biotin binding. In contrast, this loop is in the open state with SBP binding. Replacement of glycine-48 with a bulkier residue (threonine) in this loop selectively reduces the biotin binding affinity (Kd) from 4 × 10(-14) M to 4.45 × 10(-10) M without affecting the SBP binding affinity. Introduction of a second mutation (S27A) to the first mutein (G48T) results in the development of a novel engineered streptavidin SAVSBPM18 which could be recombinantly produced in the functional form from Bacillus subtilis via secretion. To form an intact binding pocket for tight binding of SBP, two diagonally oriented subunits in a tetrameric streptavidin are required. It is vital for SAVSBPM18 to be stably in the tetrameric state in solution. This was confirmed using an HPLC/Laser light scattering system. SAVSBPM18 retains high binding affinity to SBP but has reversible biotin binding capability. The SAVSBPM18 matrix can be applied to affinity purify SBP-tagged proteins or biotinylated molecules to homogeneity with high recovery in a reusable manner. A mild washing step is sufficient to regenerate the matrix which can be reused for multiple rounds. Other applications including development of automated protein purification systems, lab-on-a-chip micro-devices, reusable biosensors, bioreactors and microarrays, and strippable detection agents for various blots are possible.
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Functional characterization and localization of a Bacillus subtilis sortase and its substrate and use of this sortase system to covalently anchor a heterologous protein to the B. subtilis cell wall for surface display.
J. Bacteriol.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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Sortases catalyze the covalent anchoring of proteins to the cell surface on Gram-positive bacteria. Bioinformatic analysis suggests the presence of structural genes encoding sortases and their substrates in the Bacillus subtilis genome. In this study, a ?-lactamase reporter was fused to the cell wall anchoring domain from a putative sortase substrate, YhcR. Covalent anchoring of this fusion protein to the cell wall was confirmed by using the eight-protease-deficient B. subtilis strain WB800 as the host. Inactivation of yhcS abolished the cell wall anchoring reaction. The amounts of fusion protein anchored to the cell wall were proportional to the levels of YhcS. These data demonstrate that YhcS and YhcR are the sortase and sortase substrate, respectively, in B. subtilis. Furthermore, yhcS is not essential for the survival of B. subtilis under the cultivation condition tested. YhcR fusions were distributed helically in the lateral cell wall. Interestingly, when viewed with an epifluorescence microscope, YhcS also appeared to form short helical arcs. This is the first report to illustrate such distribution of sortases in a rod-shaped bacterium. Models for the spatial distribution of both the sortase and its substrate are discussed. The amount of the reporters displayed on the surface was unambiguously quantified via a unique strategy. Under optimal conditions with the overproduction of YhcS, 47,300 YhcR fusions could be displayed per cell. Displayed reporters were biologically functional and surface accessible. Characterization of the sortase-substrate system allowed the successful development of a YhcR-based covalent surface display system. This system may have various biotechnological applications.
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Ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations in children: correlation of clinical outcome with admission parameters.
Pediatr Neurosurg
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2010
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To gain a better understanding of how clinical outcome in children with ruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) correlates with clinical and imaging parameters on admission.
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Results of excision of cerebral radionecrosis: experience in patients treated with radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
J. Neurosurg.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2010
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In theory, the purpose of the treatment of cerebral radionecrosis (CRN), a nonneoplastic condition, is to minimize loss of brain function by preventing the progression and reversing some of the processes of CRN. In a practical sense, factors for achieving this purpose may include the following: removal of a CRN lesion that is causing mass effect, control of brain edema, prevention of recurrence of CRN lesions, minimization of adverse effects from treatments, and achievement of reasonably long and good-quality survivals. Based on these practical issues, the authors performed a retrospective study to evaluate the results of excision for the treatment of CRN.
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Engineering monomeric streptavidin and its ligands with infinite affinity in binding but reversibility in interaction.
Proteins
PUBLISHED: 05-09-2009
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Natural tetrameric streptavidin captures and immobilizes biotinylated molecules with ultra-tight binding (K(d) approximately 10(-13) to 10(-14) M). In contrast, engineered monomeric streptavidin offers reversible binding (K(d) approximately 10(-7) M). To develop an ideal engineered streptavidin which possesses both the immobilization capability of the natural streptavidin and the reversible interaction reactivity of the monomeric streptavidin, a pair of engineered biomaterials was designed through molecular modeling. This system consists of two recombinant components: an engineered monomeric streptavidin M6, which has a cysteine residue (C118) near the biotin binding site, and a cysteine containing biotinylation tag. Interactions between M6 and the biotinylated peptide tag go through a two-stage process (capture and immobilization) to generate a covalently linked complex. Biotinylation is essential in the capture stage. Once the biotin moiety in the biotinylated tag is captured by M6, the biotinylated tag can fold back and rotate on the surface of the complex with the biotinylated lysine in the peptide tag as the axis until the formationof a disulfide bond. Consequently, cysteine residue in different positions flanking the biotin residue in the biotinylation tag can successfully form a disulfide bond with M6. Intermolecular disulfide bond formation between M6 and the tag containing protein offers the immobilization capability to M6. In the presence of reducing agent and biotin, bound ligands can be dissociated. This system has the potential to extend the biotin-streptavidin technology to develop reusable biosensor/protein chips and bioreactors.
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Redistribution of hematoma to spinal subdural space as a mechanism for the rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial acute subdural hematoma: case report.
Surg Neurol
PUBLISHED: 03-06-2009
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Rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH has been reported in the literature since 1986. We report a case to demonstrate that redistribution of hematoma to the spinal subdural space is a mechanism for the rapid spontaneous resolution of posttraumatic intracranial ASDH.
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Anterior chamber instability caused by incisional leakage in coaxial phacoemulsification.
J Cataract Refract Surg
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2009
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To establish the percentage of fluid loss through incisions during coaxial phacoemulsification and analyze whether simple measures can reduce it.
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Production of XynX, a large multimodular protein of thermoanaerobacterium sp., by protease-deficient Bacillus subtilis strains [corrected].
Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol.
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XynX of Thermoanaerobacterium sp. [corrected] is a large, multimodular xylanase of 116 kDa. An Escherichia coli transformant carrying the entire xynX produced three active truncated xylanase species of 105, 85, and 64 kDa intracellularly. The Bacillus subtilis WB700 transformant with the xynX, a strain deficient in seven proteases including Vpr, secreted two active truncated xylanase species of 65 and 44 kDa. The B. subtilis WB800 transformant with xynX, a strain deficient in eight proteases including Vpr and WprA, secreted more active enzymes, 8.46 U ml(-1), mostly in the form of 105 and 85 kDa, than the WB700 transformant, 6.93 U ml(-1). This indicates that the additional deletion of wprA enabled the WB800 to secrete XynX in its intact form. B. subtilis WB800 produced more total enzyme activity than E. coli (1,692 ± 274 U vs. 141.9 ± 27.1 U), and, more importantly, secreted almost all the enzyme activity. The results suggest the potential use of B. subtilis WB800 as a host system for the production of large multimodular proteins.
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Development of a tetrameric streptavidin mutein with reversible biotin binding capability: engineering a mobile loop as an exit door for biotin.
PLoS ONE
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A novel form of tetrameric streptavidin has been engineered to have reversible biotin binding capability. In wild-type streptavidin, loop(3-4) functions as a lid for the entry and exit of biotin. When biotin is bound, interactions between biotin and key residues in loop(3-4) keep this lid in the closed state. In the engineered mutein, a second biotin exit door is created by changing the amino acid sequence of loop(7-8). This door is mobile even in the presence of the bound biotin and can facilitate the release of biotin from the mutein. Since loop(7-8) is involved in subunit interactions, alteration of this loop in the engineered mutein results in an 11° rotation between the two dimers in reference to wild-type streptavidin. The tetrameric state of the engineered mutein is stabilized by a H127C mutation, which leads to the formation of inter-subunit disulfide bonds. The biotin binding kinetic parameters (k(off) of 4.28×10(-4) s(-1) and K(d) of 1.9×10(-8) M) make this engineered mutein a superb affinity agent for the purification of biotinylated biomolecules. Affinity matrices can be regenerated using gentle procedures, and regenerated matrices can be reused at least ten times without any observable reduction in binding capacity. With the combination of both the engineered mutein and wild-type streptavidin, biotinylated biomolecules can easily be affinity purified to high purity and immobilized to desirable platforms without any leakage concerns. Other potential biotechnological applications, such as development of an automated high-throughput protein purification system, are feasible.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.