JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Evaluation of epidemiological cut-off values indicates that biocide resistant subpopulations are uncommon in natural isolates of clinically-relevant microorganisms.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To date there are no clear criteria to determine whether a microbe is susceptible to biocides or not. As a starting point for distinguishing between wild-type and resistant organisms, we set out to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) distributions for four common biocides; triclosan, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite for 3319 clinical isolates, with a particular focus on Staphylococcus aureus (N?=?1635) and Salmonella spp. (N?=?901) but also including Escherichia coli (N?=?368), Candida albicans (N?=?200), Klebsiella pneumoniae (N?=?60), Enterobacter spp. (N?=?54), Enterococcus faecium (N?=?53), and Enterococcus faecalis (N?=?56). From these data epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) are proposed. As would be expected, MBCs were higher than MICs for all biocides. In most cases both values followed a normal distribution. Bimodal distributions, indicating the existence of biocide resistant subpopulations were observed for Enterobacter chlorhexidine susceptibility (both MICs and MBCs) and the susceptibility to triclosan of Enterobacter (MBC), E. coli (MBC and MIC) and S. aureus (MBC and MIC). There is a concern on the potential selection of antibiotic resistance by biocides. Our results indicate however that resistance to biocides and, hence any potential association with antibiotic resistance, is uncommon in natural populations of clinically relevant microorganisms.
Related JoVE Video
Multiclonal dispersal of KPC genes following the emergence of non-ST258 KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clones in Madrid, Spain.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To analyse the ongoing epidemiology of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae after a non-ST258 KPC-3-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae outbreak in a university hospital in Madrid, Spain.
Related JoVE Video
Dissemination of blaKPC-2 by the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae clonal complex 258 clones (ST258, ST11, ST437) and plasmids (IncFII, IncN, IncL/M) among Enterobacteriaceae species in Brazil.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 05-16-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This article reports the spread of bla(KPC-2) in the Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro states, facilitated by globally spread K. pneumoniae clonal complex 258 (CC258) clones (ST258, ST11, and ST437) and a diversity of plasmids (IncFII, IncN, and IncL/M, two untypeable plasmids carrying Tn4401a or Tn4401b) successfully disseminated among species of the Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii). It also constitutes the first description of sequence type 258 (ST258) in Brazil, which was associated with a nosocomial hospital outbreak in Ribeirao Preto city.
Related JoVE Video
Association of composite IS26-sul3 elements with highly transmissible IncI1 plasmids in extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli clones from humans.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The association of an IS440-sul3 platform with Tn21 class 1 integrons carried by IncI1 plasmids encoding extended-spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs; mainly SHV-12 and CTX-M-14) among worldwide Escherichia coli clones of phylogroups A (ST10, ST23, and ST46), B1 (ST155, ST351, and ST359), and D/B2 (ST131) is reported. An in silico comparative analysis of sul3 elements available in the GenBank database shows the evolution of sul3 platforms by hosting different transposable elements facilitating the potential genesis of IS26 composite transposons and further insertion element-mediated promoted arrangements.
Related JoVE Video
Emergence of bla KPC-3-Tn4401a associated with a pKPN3/4-like plasmid within ST384 and ST388 Klebsiella pneumoniae clones in Spain.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
KPC carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates have been increasingly detected in Europe. We report the first KPC-producing isolates characterized in Madrid, Spain.
Related JoVE Video
Characterization of plasmids encoding blaESBL and surrounding genes in Spanish clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.
J. Antimicrob. Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The aim of the study was to characterize plasmids that harbour blaESBL genes and their genetic environment in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clones circulating in Spain.
Related JoVE Video
Fecal carriage of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: a hidden reservoir in hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Fecal carriage of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) has not been extensively investigated, except in the cases of selected patients at risk, mostly during outbreaks. A total of 1,100 fecal samples randomly collected in our institution in two different periods in 2006 (n = 600) and 2009-2010 (n = 500) from hospitalized (26.8%) and nonhospitalized (73.2%) patients were screened for CPE. The first period coincided with an outbreak of VIM-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae, and the second one coincided with the emergence of KPC enzymes in our hospital. Diluted samples in saline were cultured in Luria-Bertani broth with 1 ?g/ml imipenem and subcultured in MacConkey agar plates with 4 ?g/ml ceftazidime. Growing colonies were screened for CPE (modified Hodge test and EDTA and boronic acid synergy tests). Carbapenemase genes, plasmids in which they are located, and clonal relatedness were determined. Individuals who exhibited fecal carriage of CPE (11/1,043, 1.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53 to 1.88) included 8 hospitalized (carriage rate, 2.9%; 95% CI, 1.24 to 5.55) and 3 nonhospitalized patients (carriage rate, 0.4%; 95% CI, 0.08 to 1.14), the latter being identified in 2009. Eighty-two percent of colonized patients were not infected with CPE. Isolates harboring bla(VIM-1) with or without bla(SHV-12) were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 8; ST39, ST688, ST253, and ST163), Enterobacter cloacae (n = 3; two pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] types), Escherichia coli (n = 2; ST155 and ST2441), and Citrobacter freundii (n = 1). Some of these lineages had previously been detected in our institution. The bla(VIM-1) gene was a member of the class 1 integrons In110 (bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-aadA1) and In113 (bla(VIM-1)-aacA4-dhfrII) located on plasmids IncN (n = 11; 30 to 50 kb) and IncHI2 (n = 3; 300 kb), respectively. Dissemination of bla(VIM-1) class-1 integrons within highly transferable plasmids in a polyclonal population has potentially contributed to the maintenance and spread of CPE.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.