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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Antibodies against muscle-specific kinase impair both presynaptic and postsynaptic functions in a murine model of myasthenia gravis.
Am. J. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2011
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Antibodies against acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) cause pathogenicity in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients through complement pathway-mediated destruction of postsynaptic membranes at neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). However, antibodies against muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), which constitute a major subclass of antibodies found in MG patients, do not activate the complement pathway. To investigate the pathophysiology of MuSK-MG and establish an experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) model, we injected MuSK protein into mice deficient in complement component five (C5). MuSK-injected mice simultaneously developed severe muscle weakness, accompanied by an electromyographic pattern such as is typically observed in MG patients. In addition, we observed morphological and functional defects in the NMJs of EAMG mice, demonstrating that complement activation is not necessary for the onset of MuSK-MG. Furthermore, MuSK-injected mice exhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor-evoked cholinergic hypersensitivity, as is observed in MuSK-MG patients, and a decrease in both AChE and the AChE-anchoring protein collagen Q at postsynaptic membranes. These findings suggest that MuSK is indispensable for the maintenance of NMJ structure and function, and that disruption of MuSK activity by autoantibodies causes MG. This mouse model of EAMG could be used to develop appropriate medications for the treatment of MuSK-MG in humans.
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Muscle weakness and neuromuscular junctions in aging and disease.
Geriatr Gerontol Int
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2010
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A critical issue in todays super-aging society is the need to reduce the burden of family care while continuing to make our medical institutions supportive. A rapidly emerging, major health concern is the debilitating effect of muscle weakness and atrophy from aging, termed sarcopenia; however, the molecular basis of this condition is not well understood. Our research aim is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of age-related muscle atrophy and to devise new measures for preventing and treating this disability. A promising treatment for muscle atrophy is the promotion of muscle regeneration by recruiting stem cells into the targeted region. The first requirement is to understand how the motor system, which consists of muscles and motoneurons, is maintained to accomplish that goal. Recent studies in the field of neuroscience have focused on neuromuscular junctions (NMJ), which play important roles in the maintenance of both motor nerves and muscle fibers. Signaling between muscles and motoneurons at NMJ supports interactions within the motor system. To understand the mechanisms involved, we focus our research on the pathogenic processes underlying neuromuscular diseases. The well-known autoimmune disease, myasthenia gravis (MG), serves as a model not only for tracking the pathogenesis and treatment outcomes of all autoimmune diseases, but also for understanding synaptic functions in maintaining the motor system. Here, we describe recent insights into the molecular mechanisms required for the maintenance of NMJ and the related causes of muscle atrophy.
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3,4-Diaminopyridine improves neuromuscular transmission in a MuSK antibody-induced mouse model of myasthenia gravis.
J. Neuroimmunol.
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This study investigated the effect of 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), a potent potentiator of transmitter release, on neuromuscular transmission in vivo in a mouse model of myasthenia gravis (MG) caused by antibodies against muscle-specific kinase (MuSK; MuSK-MG) and ex vivo in diaphragm muscle from these mice. 3,4-DAP significantly improved neuromuscular transmission, predominantly by increasing acetylcholine (ACh) release, supporting presynaptic potentiation as an effective treatment strategy for MuSK-MG patients who have defective transmitter release. In MuSK-MG, we suggest that only low-dose acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors be used to avoid side effects, and we propose that 3,4-DAP may be effective as a symptomatic therapy.
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Testosterone deficiency accelerates neuronal and vascular aging of SAMP8 mice: protective role of eNOS and SIRT1.
PLoS ONE
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Oxidative stress and atherosclerosis-related vascular disorders are risk factors for cognitive decline with aging. In a small clinical study in men, testosterone improved cognitive function; however, it is unknown how testosterone ameliorates the pathogenesis of cognitive decline with aging. Here, we investigated whether the cognitive decline in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), which exhibits cognitive impairment and hypogonadism, could be reversed by testosterone, and the mechanism by which testosterone inhibits cognitive decline. We found that treatment with testosterone ameliorated cognitive function and inhibited senescence of hippocampal vascular endothelial cells of SAMP8. Notably, SAMP8 showed enhancement of oxidative stress in the hippocampus. We observed that an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, SIRT1, played an important role in the protective effect of testosterone against oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence. Testosterone increased eNOS activity and subsequently induced SIRT1 expression. SIRT1 inhibited endothelial senescence via up-regulation of eNOS. Finally, we showed, using co-culture system, that senescent endothelial cells promoted neuronal senescence through humoral factors. Our results suggest a critical role of testosterone and SIRT1 in the prevention of vascular and neuronal aging.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.