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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2014
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Environmentally induced alterations in the commensal microbiota have been implicated in the increasing prevalence of food allergy. We show here that sensitization to a food allergen is increased in mice that have been treated with antibiotics or are devoid of a commensal microbiota. By selectively colonizing gnotobiotic mice, we demonstrate that the allergy-protective capacity is conferred by a Clostridia-containing microbiota. Microarray analysis of intestinal epithelial cells from gnotobiotic mice revealed a previously unidentified mechanism by which Clostridia regulate innate lymphoid cell function and intestinal epithelial permeability to protect against allergen sensitization. Our findings will inform the development of novel approaches to prevent or treat food allergy based on modulating the composition of the intestinal microbiota.
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The role of commensal bacteria in the regulation of sensitization to food allergens.
FEBS Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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The prevalence of life-threatening anaphylactic responses to food is rising at an alarming rate. The emerging role of the gut microbiota in regulating food allergen sensitization may help explain this trend. The mechanisms by which commensal bacteria influence sensitization to dietary antigens are only beginning to be explored. We have found that a population of mucosa-associated commensal anaerobes prevents food allergen sensitization by promoting an IL-22-dependent barrier protective immune response that limits the access of food allergens to the systemic circulation. This early response is followed by an adaptive immune response mediated in part by an expansion of Foxp3(+) Tregs that fortifies the tolerogenic milieu needed to maintain non-responsiveness to food. Bacterial metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids, may contribute to the process through their ability to promote Foxp3(+) Treg differentiation. This work suggests that environmentally induced alterations of the gut microbiota offset the regulatory signals conferred by protective bacterial species to promote aberrant responses to food. Our research presents exciting new possibilities for preventing and treating food allergies based on interventions that modulate the composition of the gut microbiota.
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Microbial regulation of allergic responses to food.
Semin Immunopathol
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The incidence of food allergy in developed countries is rising at a rate that cannot be attributed to genetic variation alone. In this review, we discuss the environmental factors that may contribute to the increasing prevalence of potentially fatal anaphylactic responses to food. Decreased exposure to enteric infections due to advances in vaccination and sanitation, along with the adoption of high-fat (Western) diets, antibiotic use, Cesarean birth, and formula feeding of infants, have all been implicated in altering the enteric microbiome away from its ancestral state. This collection of resident commensal microbes performs many important physiological functions and plays a central role in the development of the immune system. We hypothesize that alterations in the microbiome interfere with immune system maturation, resulting in impairment of IgA production, reduced abundance of regulatory T cells, and Th2-skewing of baseline immune responses which drive aberrant responses to innocuous (food) antigens.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.