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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Teeth and tongue discoloration after linezolid treatment in children.
Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-13-2013
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We describe 3 children who developed teeth and tongue discoloration while receiving intravenous linezolid for 2 to 3 weeks. Linezolid was coadministered with piperacillin-tazobactam or meropenem. Teeth and tongue discoloration was reversible with dental cleaning after discontinuation of linezolid. We review the published pediatric and adult cases regarding teeth and tongue discoloration after linezolid administration.
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Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency leads to long-term immunological recovery and metabolic correction.
Sci Transl Med
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2011
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Genetic defects in the purine salvage enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with profound depletion of T, B, and natural killer cell lineages. Human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a successful treatment option. However, individuals who lack a matched donor must receive mismatched transplants, which are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for ADA-SCID is available, but the associated suboptimal correction of immunological defects leaves patients susceptible to infection. Here, six children were treated with autologous CD34-positive hematopoietic bone marrow stem and progenitor cells transduced with a conventional gammaretroviral vector encoding the human ADA gene. All patients stopped ERT and received mild chemotherapy before infusion of gene-modified cells. All patients survived, with a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 24 to 84 months). Four of the six patients recovered immune function as a result of engraftment of gene-corrected cells. In two patients, treatment failed because of disease-specific and technical reasons: Both restarted ERT and remain well. Of the four reconstituted patients, three remained off enzyme replacement. Moreover, three of these four patients discontinued immunoglobulin replacement, and all showed effective metabolic detoxification. All patients remained free of infection, and two cleared problematic persistent cytomegalovirus infection. There were no adverse leukemic side effects. Thus, gene therapy for ADA-SCID is safe, with effective immunological and metabolic correction, and may offer a viable alternative to conventional unrelated donor HSCT.
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Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in 2 children with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease from their unaffected HLA-identical siblings selected using preimplantation genetic diagnosis combined with HLA typing.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2009
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We report 2 children with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) using grafts from their siblings selected before implantation to be both unaffected and HLA-matched donors. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) along with HLA-typing were performed on preimplantation embryos by single-cell multiplex polymerase chain reaction using informative short tandem repeat markers in the HLA locus together with the gene region containing the mutations. Two singleton pregnancies resulted from the intrauterine transfer of selected embryos; these developed to term, producing 1 healthy female and 1 X-CGD carrier female, which are HLA-identical siblings to the 2 affected children. Combined grafts of umbilical cord blood (UCB) and bone marrow (BM) stem cells were administered to the recipients after myeloablative (MA) conditioning at the ages of 4.5 years and 4 years, respectively. Both patients are well, with complete donor hematopoietic and immunologic reconstitution, at 18 and 13 months posttransplantation, respectively. This report demonstrates that HSCT with HLA-matched sibling donors created by PGD/HLA typing of in vitro fertilized embryos is a realistic therapeutic option and should be presented as such to families with children who require a non-urgent HSCT but lack an HLA-genoidentical donor.
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Chronic granulomatous disease: the European experience.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2009
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CGD is an immunodeficiency caused by deletions or mutations in genes that encode subunits of the leukocyte NADPH oxidase complex. Normally, assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex in phagosomes of certain phagocytic cells leads to a "respiratory burst", essential for the clearance of phagocytosed micro-organisms. CGD patients lack this mechanism, which leads to life-threatening infections and granuloma formation. However, a clear picture of the clinical course of CGD is hampered by its low prevalence (approximately 1:250,000). Therefore, extensive clinical data from 429 European patients were collected and analyzed. Of these patients 351 were males and 78 were females. X-linked (XL) CGD (gp91(phox) deficient) accounted for 67% of the cases, autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance for 33%. AR-CGD was diagnosed later in life, and the mean survival time was significantly better in AR patients (49.6 years) than in XL CGD (37.8 years), suggesting a milder disease course in AR patients. The disease manifested itself most frequently in the lungs (66% of patients), skin (53%), lymph nodes (50%), gastrointestinal tract (48%) and liver (32%). The most frequently cultured micro-organisms per episode were Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Aspergillus spp. (26%), and Salmonella spp. (16%). Surprisingly, Pseudomonas spp. (2%) and Burkholderia cepacia (<1%) were found only sporadically. Lesions induced by inoculation with BCG occurred in 8% of the patients. Only 71% of the patients received antibiotic maintenance therapy, and 53% antifungal prophylaxis. 33% were treated with gamma-interferon. 24 patients (6%) had received a stem cell transplantation. The most prominent reason of death was pneumonia and pulmonary abscess (18/84 cases), septicemia (16/84) and brain abscess (4/84). These data provide further insight in the clinical course of CGD in Europe and hopefully can help to increase awareness and optimize the treatment of these patients.
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A syndrome with congenital neutropenia and mutations in G6PC3.
N. Engl. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2009
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The main features of severe congenital neutropenia are the onset of severe bacterial infections early in life, a paucity of mature neutrophils, and an increased risk of leukemia. In many patients, the genetic causes of severe congenital neutropenia are unknown.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.