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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
A crucial role of activin A-mediated growth hormone suppression in mouse and human heart failure.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2011
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Infusion of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNC) has been reported to ameliorate cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction. In this study, we investigated whether infusion of BMMNC is also effective for non-ischemic heart failure model mice and the underlying mechanisms. Intravenous infusion of BMMNC showed transient cardioprotective effects on animal models with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) without their engraftment in heart, suggesting that BMMNC infusion improves cardiac function via humoral factors rather than their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Using conditioned media from sorted BMMNC, we found that the cardioprotective effects were mediated by growth hormone (GH) secreted from myeloid (Gr-1(+)) cells and the effects was partially mediated by signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, the GH expression in Gr-1(+) cells was significantly downregulated in DCM mice compared with that in healthy control, suggesting that the environmental cue in heart failure might suppress the Gr-1(+) cells function. Activin A was upregulated in the serum of DCM models and induced downregulation of GH levels in Gr-1(+) cells and serum. Furthermore, humoral factors upregulated in heart failure including angiotensin II upregulated activin A in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) via activation of NF?B. Similarly, serum activin A levels were also significantly higher in DCM patients with heart failure than in healthy subjects and the GH levels in conditioned medium from PBMNC of DCM patients were lower than that in healthy subjects. Inhibition of activin A increased serum GH levels and improved cardiac function of DCM model mice. These results suggest that activin A causes heart failure by suppressing GH activity and that inhibition of activin A might become a novel strategy for the treatment of heart failure.
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Implantation of cardiac progenitor cells using self-assembling peptide improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.
J. Mol. Cell. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2010
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Implantation of various types of cells into the heart has been reported to be effective for heart failure, however, it is unknown what kinds of cells are most suitable for myocardial repair. To examine which types of cells are most effective, we injected cell-Puramatrix™ (PM) complex into the border area and overlaid the cell-PM patch on the myocardial infarction (MI) area. We compared cardiac morphology and function at 2 weeks after transplantation. Among clonal stem cell antigen-1 positive cardiac progenitors with PM (cSca-1/PM), bone marrow mononuclear cells with PM (BM/PM), skeletal myoblasts with PM (SM/PM), adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal cells with PM (AMC/PM), PM alone (PM), and non-treated MI group (MI), the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was smaller than that of BM/PM, SM/PM, PM and MI. cSca-1/PM and AMC/PM attenuated ventricular enlargement and restored cardiac function in comparison with MI. Capillary density in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was higher than that of other five groups. The percentage of TUNEL positive cardiomyocytes in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was lower than that of MI and PM. cSca-1 secreted VEGF and some of them differentiated into cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that transplantation of cSca-1/PM most effectively prevents cardiac remodeling and dysfunction through angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis and myocardial regeneration.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.