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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Validation of Endothelin B Receptor Antibodies Reveals Two Distinct Receptor-related Bands on Western Blot.
Anal. Biochem.
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2014
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Antibodies are important tools for the study of protein expression, but are often used without full validation. In this study, we use Western blots to characterize antibodies targeted to the N- (NT) or C-termini (CT) and the second (IL2) or third intracellular (IL3) loops of the endothelin B receptor (ETB). The IL2-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB expression in rat brain and cultured rat astrocytes by labeling a 50kD band, the expected weight of full-length ETB. However, this antibody failed to detect transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures. In contrast, the NT-targeted antibody accurately detected endogenous ETB in rat astrocyte cultures and transfected ETB in HEK293 cultures by labeling a 37 kD band, but failed to detect endogenous ETB in rat brain. Bands detected by the CT-targeted or IL3-targeted antibodies were found to be unrelated to ETB. Our findings show that functional ETB receptors can be detected at 50 kD or 37 kD on Western blot, with drastic differences in antibody affinity for these bands. The 37 kD band likely reflects ETB receptor processing, which appears to be dependent on cell type and/or culture condition.
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Sensitization of cutaneous neuronal purinergic receptors contributes to endothelin-1-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2014
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Endothelin (ET-1), an endogenous peptide with a prominent role in cutaneous pain, causes mechanical hypersensitivity in the rat hind paw, partly through mechanisms involving local release of algogenic molecules in the skin. The present study investigated involvement of cutaneous ATP, which contributes to pain in numerous animal models. Pre-exposure of ND7/104 immortalized sensory neurons to ET-1 (30nM) for 10min increased the proportion of cells responding to ATP (2?M) with an increase in intracellular calcium, an effect prevented by the ETA receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. ET-1 (3nM) pre-exposure also increased the proportion of isolated mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons responding to ATP (0.2-0.4?M). Blocking ET-1-evoked increases in intracellular calcium with the IP3 receptor antagonist 2-APB did not inhibit sensitization to ATP, indicating a mechanism independent of ET-1-mediated intracellular calcium increases. ET-1-sensitized ATP calcium responses were largely abolished in the absence of extracellular calcium, implicating ionotropic P2X receptors. Experiments using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and receptor-selective ligands in ND7/104 showed that ET-1-induced sensitization most likely involves the P2X4 receptor subtype. ET-1-sensitized calcium responses to ATP were strongly inhibited by broad-spectrum (TNP-ATP) and P2X4-selective (5-BDBD) antagonists, but not antagonists for other P2X subtypes. TNP-ATP and 5-BDBD also significantly inhibited ET-1-induced mechanical sensitization in the rat hind paw, supporting a role for purinergic receptor sensitization in vivo. These data provide evidence that mechanical hypersensitivity caused by cutaneous ET-1 involves an increase in the neuronal sensitivity to ATP in the skin, possibly due to sensitization of P2X4 receptors.
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Air-stimulated ATP release from keratinocytes occurs through connexin hemichannels.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Cutaneous ATP release plays an important role in both epidermal stratification and chronic pain, but little is known about ATP release mechanisms in keratinocytes that comprise the epidermis. In this study, we analyzed ATP release from cultured human neonatal keratinocytes briefly exposed to air, a process previously demonstrated to trigger ATP release from these cells. We show that exposing keratinocytes to air by removing media for 15 seconds causes a robust, long-lasting ATP release. This air-stimulated ATP release was increased in calcium differentiated cultures which showed a corresponding increase in connexin 43 mRNA, a major component of keratinocyte hemichannels. The known connexin hemichannel inhibitors 1-octanol and carbenoxolone both significantly reduced air-stimulated ATP release, as did two drugs traditionally used as ABC transporter inhibitors (glibenclamide and verapamil). These same 4 inhibitors also prevented an increase in the uptake of a connexin permeable dye induced by air exposure, confirming that connexin hemichannels are open during air-stimulated ATP release. In contrast, activity of the MDR1 ABC transporter was reduced by air exposure and the drugs that inhibited air-stimulated ATP release had differential effects on this transporter. These results indicate that air exposure elicits non-vesicular release of ATP from keratinocytes through connexin hemichannels and that drugs used to target connexin hemichannels and ABC transporters may cross-inhibit. Connexins represent a novel, peripheral target for the treatment of chronic pain and dermatological disease.
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Keratinocyte expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide ?: implications for neuropathic and inflammatory pain mechanisms.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2011
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Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a vasodilatory peptide that has been detected at high levels in the skin, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) under a variety of inflammatory and chronic pain conditions, presumably derived from peptidergic C and A? innervation. Herein, CGRP immunolabeling (IL) was detected in epidermal keratinocytes at levels that were especially high and widespread in the skin of humans from locations afflicted with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and complex region pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS), of monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, and of rats subjected to L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation, sciatic nerve chronic constriction, and subcutaneous injection of complete Freunds adjuvant. Increased CGRP-IL was also detected in epidermal keratinocytes of transgenic mice with keratin-14 promoter driven overexpression of noggin, an antagonist to BMP-4 signaling. Transcriptome microarray, quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR), and Western blot analyses using laser-captured mouse epidermis from transgenics, monolayer cultures of human and mouse keratinocytes, and multilayer human keratinocyte organotypic cultures, revealed that keratinocytes express predominantly the beta isoform of CGRP. Cutaneous peptidergic innervation has been shown to express predominantly the alpha isoform of CGRP. Keratinocytes also express the cognate CGRP receptor components, Calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), Receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) consistent with known observations that CGRP promotes several functional changes in keratinocytes, including proliferation and cytokine production. Our results indicate that keratinocyte-derived CGRP? may modulate epidermal homeostasis through autocrine/paracrine signaling and may contribute to chronic pain under pathological conditions.
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ET-1 induced Elevation of intracellular calcium in clonal neuronal and embryonic kidney cells involves endogenous endothelin-A receptors linked to phospholipase C through G?(q/11).
Pharmacol. Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-17-2011
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Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a pain mediator, elevated in skin after injury, which potentiates noxious thermal and mechanical stimuli (hyperalgesia) through the activation of ET(A) (and, perhaps, ET(B)) receptors on pain fibers. Part of the mechanism underlying this effect has recently been shown to involve potentiation of neuronal TRPV1 by PKC?. However, the early steps of this pathway, which are recapitulated in HEK 293 cells co-expressing TRPV1 and ET(A) receptors, remain unexplored. To clarify these steps, we investigated the pharmacological profile and signaling properties of native endothelin receptors in immortalized cell lines including HEK 293 and ND7 model sensory neurons. Previously we showed that in ND7/104, a dorsal root ganglia-derived cell line, ET-1 elicits a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](in)) which is blocked by BQ-123, an ET(A) receptor antagonist, but not by BQ-788, an ET(B) receptor antagonist, suggesting that ET(A) receptors mediate this effect. Here we extend these findings to HEK 293T cells. Examination of the expression of ET(A) and ET(B) receptors by RT-PCR and [(125)I]-ET-1 binding experiments confirms the slight predominance of ET(A) receptor binding sites and messenger RNA in both ND7/104 and HEK 293T cells. In addition, selective agonists of the ET(B) receptor (sarafotoxin 6c, BQ-3020 or IRL-1620) do not induce a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](in). Furthermore, reduction of ET(B) mRNA levels by siRNA does not abrogate calcium mobilization by ET-1 in HEK 293T cells, corroborating the lack of an ET(B) receptor role in this response. However, in HEK 293 cells with low endogenous ET(A) mRNA levels, ET-1 does not induce a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](in). Observation of the [Ca(2+)](in) elevation in ND7/104 and HEK 293T cells in the absence of extracellular calcium suggests that ET-1 elicits a release of calcium from intracellular stores, and pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin or a selective inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC) point to a mechanism involving G?q/11 coupling. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a certain threshold of ET(A) receptor expression is necessary to drive a transient [Ca(2+)](in) increase in these cells and that this process involves release of calcium from intracellular stores following G?q/11 activation.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.