JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Identification of a common molecular pathway in hypertensive renal damage: comparison of rat and human gene expression profiles.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
There is a common structural progression in hypertensive renal damage with early arterial damage and fibrosis in the juxtamedullary cortex.
Related JoVE Video
Distinct protein signature of hypertension-induced damage in the renal proteome of the two-kidney, one-clip rat model.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 10-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Hypertensive nephrosclerosis is one of the most frequent causes of chronic kidney failure. Proteome analysis potentially improves the pathophysiological understanding and diagnostic precision of this disorder. In the present exploratory study, we investigated experimental nephrosclerosis in the two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) hypertensive rat model.
Related JoVE Video
Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded glomeruli suggests depletion of glomerular filtration barrier proteins in two-kidney one-clip hypertensive rats.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
It is well known that hypertension may cause glomerular damage, but the molecular mechanisms involved are still incompletely understood.
Related JoVE Video
Arterial damage precedes the development of interstitial damage in the nonclipped kidney of two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The progression of damage in the renal cortex has not been investigated in the nonclipped kidney of the two-kidney, one-clip model of renal hypertension. In other hypertensive models, damage has been found to progress from the juxtamedullary cortex (JMC) and outward, which has been attributed to early vascular effects.
Related JoVE Video
Nitric oxide in afferent arterioles after uninephrectomy depends on extracellular L-arginine.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Uninephrectomy (UNX) causes hyperperfusion of the contralateral remaining kidney via increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Although the exact mechanism remains largely unknown, we hypothesize that this would be localized to the afferent arteriole and that it depends on cellular uptake of l-arginine. The experiments were performed in rats 2 days (early) or 6 wk (late) after UNX and compared with controls (Sham) to study acute and chronic effects on NO metabolism. Renal blood flow was increased after UNX (21 ± 2 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1) in sham, 30 ± 3 in early, and 26 ± 1 in late, P < 0.05). NO inhibition with N(?)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) caused a greater increase in renal vascular resistance in early UNX compared with Sham and late UNX (138 ± 24 vs. 88 ± 10, and 84 ± 7%, P < 0.01). The lower limit of autoregulation was increased both in early and late UNX compared with Sham (P < 0.05). L-NAME did not affect the ANG II-induced contraction of isolated afferent arterioles (AA) from Sham. AA from early UNX displayed a more pronounced contraction in response to L-NAME (-57 ± 7 vs. -16 ± 7%, P < 0.05) and in the absence of L-arginine (-41 ± 4%, P < 0.05) compared with both late UNX and Sham. mRNA expression of endothelial NO synthase was reduced, whereas protein expression was unchanged. Cationic amino acid transporter-1 and -2 mRNA was increased, while protein was unaffected in isolated preglomerular resistance vessels. In conclusion, NO-dependent hyperperfusion of the remaining kidney in early UNX is associated with increased NO release from the afferent arteriole, which is highly dependent on extracellular L-arginine availability.
Related JoVE Video
Angiotensin II-induced contraction is attenuated by nitric oxide in afferent arterioles from the nonclipped kidney in 2K1C.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) is a model of renovascular hypertension where we previously found an exaggerated intracellular calcium (Ca(i)(2+)) response to ANG II in isolated afferent arterioles (AAs) from the clipped kidney (Helle F, Vagnes OB, Iversen BM. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 291: F140-F147, 2006). To test whether nitric oxide (NO) ameliorates the exaggerated ANG II response in 2K1C, we studied ANG II (10(-7) mol/l)-induced calcium signaling and contractility with or without the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). In AAs from the nonclipped kidney, l-NAME increased the ANG II-induced Ca(i)(2+) response from 0.28 +/- 0.05 to 0.55 +/- 0.09 (fura 2, 340 nm/380 nm ratio) and increased contraction from 80 +/- 6 to 60 +/- 6% of baseline (P < 0.05). In vessels from sham and clipped kidneys, l-NAME had no effect. In diaminofluorescein-FM diacetate-loaded AAs from the nonclipped kidney, ANG II increased NO-derived fluorescence to 145 +/- 34% of baseline (P < 0.05 vs. sham), but not in vessels from the sham or clipped kidney. Endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA and ser-1177 phosphorylation were unchanged in both kidneys from 2K1C, while eNOS protein was reduced in the clipped kidney compared with sham. Cationic amino acid transferase-1 and 2 mRNAs were increased in 2K1C, indicating increased availability of l-arginine for NO synthesis, but counteracted by decreased scavenging of the eNOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2. In conclusion, the Ca(i)(2+) and contractile responses to ANG II are blunted by NO release in the nonclipped kidney. This may protect the nonclipped kidney from the hypertension and elevated ANG II levels in 2K1C.
Related JoVE Video
Collagen-binding proteins in age-dependent changes in renal collagen turnover: microarray analysis of mRNA expression.
Physiol. Genomics
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Aging is associated with progressive structural and functional deterioration of the kidney. Among the morphological changes associated with renal aging is an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the glomeruli and tubuloinsterstitium, which may ultimately lead to the development of renal fibrosis. The mechanisms governing the regulation of ECM metabolism during renal aging are only incompletely defined. We present data from a genome-wide mRNA expression study on renal tissue from 90 wk old male Wistar rats and 10 wk old controls using Illumina BeadArray cDNA microarray. Regulation of candidate gene products was verified by real-time PCR. Morphological changes were evaluated by routine histological methods. Activated fibroblasts were identified by their expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen I. Morphological analysis demonstrated an expansion of the tubulointerstitial compartment with increased amounts of fibrous collagen but no overt glomerular or tubular damage in the aged rats. Activated fibroblasts were readily detectable in the adventitial layer of large renal vessels in controls and were not found in the old animals. In agreement with this finding, gene expression analysis revealed significant downregulation of collagen I mRNA along with numerous other ECM components. Concomitantly, collagen-stabilizing proteins were induced, whereas matrix metalloproteinase 9, an enzyme involved in collagen breakdown, was reduced. In conclusion, our results suggest that ECM expansion during renal aging results from an augmented stabilization in conjunction with a reduced breakdown of collagen fibers. Collagen stabilizing proteins may be essential for the control of renal ECM turnover and the pathogenesis of kidney fibrosis.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.