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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Arsenic and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.
Curr Environ Health Rep
PUBLISHED: 09-16-2014
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In epidemiologic studies, high arsenic exposure has been associated with adverse kidney disease outcomes. We performed a systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence of the association between arsenic and various kidney disease outcomes. The search period was January 1966 through January 2014. Twenty-five papers (comprising 24 studies) meeting the search criteria were identified and included in this review. In most studies, arsenic exposure was assessed by measurement of urine concentrations or with an ecological indicator. There was a generally positive association between arsenic and albuminuria and proteinuria outcomes. There was mixed evidence of an association between arsenic exposure and chronic kidney disease (CKD), ?-2 microglobulin (?2MG), and N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) outcomes. There was evidence of a positive association between arsenic exposure and kidney disease mortality. Assessment of a small number of studies with three or more categories showed a clear dose-response association between arsenic and prevalent albuminuria and proteinuria, but not with CKD outcomes. Eight studies lacked adjustment for possible confounders, and two had small study populations. The evaluation of the causality of the association between arsenic exposure and kidney disease outcomes is limited by the small number of studies, lack of study quality, and limited prospective evidence. Because of the high prevalence of arsenic exposure worldwide, there is a need for additional well-designed epidemiologic and mechanistic studies of arsenic and kidney disease outcomes.
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Association of Arsenic and Metals with Concentrations of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D among Adolescents in Torreón, Mexico.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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Limited data suggest that lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and uranium (U) may disrupt vitamin D metabolism and inhibit production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], the active vitamin D metabolite, from 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] in the kidney.
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Impact of urine concentration adjustment method on associations between urine metals and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in adolescents.
Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Positive associations between urine toxicant levels and measures of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) have been reported recently in a range of populations. The explanation for these associations, in a direction opposite that of traditional nephrotoxicity, is uncertain. Variation in associations by urine concentration adjustment approach has also been observed. Associations of urine cadmium, thallium and uranium in models of serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated GFR (eGFR) were examined using multiple linear regression in a cross-sectional study of adolescents residing near a lead smelter complex. Urine concentration adjustment approaches compared included urine creatinine, urine osmolality and no adjustment. Median age, blood lead and urine cadmium, thallium and uranium were 13.9 years, 4.0 ?g/dL, 0.22, 0.27 and 0.04 g/g creatinine, respectively, in 512 adolescents. Urine cadmium and thallium were positively associated with serum creatinine-based eGFR only when urine creatinine was used to adjust for urine concentration (? coefficient=3.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 95% confidence interval=1.4, 4.8 per each doubling of urine cadmium). Weaker positive associations, also only with urine creatinine adjustment, were observed between these metals and serum cystatin-C-based eGFR and between urine uranium and serum creatinine-based eGFR. Additional research using non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration is necessary.
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Spatial clustering of toxic trace elements in adolescents around the Torreón, Mexico lead-zinc smelter.
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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High blood lead (BPb) levels in children and elevated soil and dust arsenic, cadmium, and lead were previously found in Torreón, northern Mexico, host to the world's fourth largest lead-zinc metal smelter. The objectives of this study were to determine spatial distributions of adolescents with higher BPb and creatinine-corrected urine total arsenic, cadmium, molybdenum, thallium, and uranium around the smelter. Cross-sectional study of 512 male and female subjects 12-15 years of age was conducted. We measured BPb by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and urine trace elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, with dynamic reaction cell mode for arsenic. We constructed multiple regression models including sociodemographic variables and adjusted for subject residence spatial correlation with spatial lag or error terms. We applied local indicators of spatial association statistics to model residuals to identify hot spots of significant spatial clusters of subjects with higher trace elements. We found spatial clusters of subjects with elevated BPb (range 3.6-14.7??g/dl) and urine cadmium (0.18-1.14??g/g creatinine) adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and elevated urine thallium (0.28-0.93??g/g creatinine) and uranium (0.07-0.13??g/g creatinine) near ore transport routes, former waste, and industrial discharge sites. The conclusion derived from this study was that spatial clustering of adolescents with high BPb and urine cadmium adjacent to and downwind of the smelter and residual waste pile, areas identified over a decade ago with high lead and cadmium in soil and dust, suggests that past and/or present plant operations continue to present health risks to children in those neighborhoods.
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Blood lead level and measured glomerular filtration rate in children with chronic kidney disease.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2013
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The role of environmental exposure to lead as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its progression remains controversial, and most studies have been limited by a lack of direct glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measurement.
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Kidney function and tobacco smoke exposure in US adolescents.
Pediatrics
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
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Active smoking and secondhand smoke (SHS) are known risk factors for kidney disease in adults. We evaluated the association between exposure to active smoking or SHS and kidney function in US adolescents.
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Uranium associations with kidney outcomes vary by urine concentration adjustment method.
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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Uranium is a ubiquitous metal that is nephrotoxic at high doses. Few epidemiologic studies have examined the kidney filtration impact of chronic environmental exposure. In 684 lead workers environmentally exposed to uranium, multiple linear regression was used to examine associations of uranium measured in a 4-h urine collection with measured creatinine clearance, serum creatinine- and cystatin-C-based estimated glomerular filtration rates, and N-acetyl-?-D-glucosaminidase (NAG). Three methods were utilized, in separate models, to adjust uranium levels for urine concentration-?g uranium/g creatinine; ?g uranium/l and urine creatinine as separate covariates; and ?g uranium/4?h. Median urine uranium levels were 0.07??g/g creatinine and 0.02??g/4?h and were highly correlated (rs=0.95). After adjustment, higher ln-urine uranium was associated with lower measured creatinine clearance and higher NAG in models that used urine creatinine to adjust for urine concentration but not in models that used total uranium excreted (?g/4?h). These results suggest that, in some instances, associations between urine toxicants and kidney outcomes may be statistical, due to the use of urine creatinine in both exposure and outcome metrics, rather than nephrotoxic. These findings support consideration of non-creatinine-based methods of adjustment for urine concentration in nephrotoxicant research.
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Secondhand tobacco smoke: a source of lead exposure in US children and adolescents.
Am J Public Health
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2011
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We evaluated the relationship between secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) exposure and blood lead levels in US children and adolescents.
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Blood cadmium and estimated glomerular filtration rate in Korean adults.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 08-11-2011
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Cadmium is a nephrotoxicant at high exposure levels. Few studies have evaluated the role of cadmium in kidney function at low-exposure levels.
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Differences in urine cadmium associations with kidney outcomes based on serum creatinine and cystatin C.
Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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Cadmium is a well-known nephrotoxicant; chronic exposure increases risk for chronic kidney disease. Recently, however, associations between urine cadmium and higher creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have been reported. Analyses utilizing alternate biomarkers of kidney function allow evaluation of potential mechanisms for these observations. We compared associations of urine cadmium with kidney function measures based on serum cystatin C to those with serum creatinine in 712 lead workers. Mean (standard deviation) molybdenum-corrected urine cadmium, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) eGFR and multi-variable cystatin C eGFR were 1.02 (0.65) ?g/g creatinine, and 97.4 (19.2) and 112.0 (17.7) mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively. The eGFR measures were moderately correlated (rs=0.5; p<0.001). After adjustment, ln (urine cadmium) was not associated with serum cystatin-C-based measures. However, higher ln (urine cadmium) was associated with higher creatinine-based eGFRs including the MDRD and an equation incorporating serum cystatin C and creatinine (beta-coefficient=4.1 mL/min/1.73 m2; 95% confidence interval=1.6, 6.6). Urine creatinine was associated with serum creatinine-based but not cystatin-C-based eGFRs. These results support a biomarker-specific, rather than a kidney function, effect underlying the associations observed between higher urine cadmium and creatinine-based kidney function measures. Given the routine use of serum and urine creatinine in kidney and biomarker research, additional research to elucidate the mechanism(s) for these associations is essential.
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Associations of blood lead with estimated glomerular filtration rate using MDRD, CKD-EPI and serum cystatin C-based equations.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Low-level lead exposure is widespread and has been implicated as a chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk factor. However, studies evaluating associations of lead dose with newer, potentially more accurate, estimates of kidney function, in participants with a wide range of glomerular filtration rates (GFRs), are scarce.
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Associations of low-level urine cadmium with kidney function in lead workers.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2010
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Low-level cadmium exposure, resulting in, for example, urinary cadmium <2.0 ?g/g creatinine, is widespread; recent data suggest nephrotoxicity even at these low levels. Few studies have examined the impact of low-level cadmium exposure in workers who are occupationally exposed to other nephrotoxicants such as lead.
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Blood lead level and kidney function in US adolescents: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Arch. Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2010
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Chronic, high-level lead exposure is a known risk factor for kidney disease. The effect of current low-level environmental lead exposure is less well known, particularly among children, a population generally free from kidney disease risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the association between lead exposure and kidney function in a representative sample of US adolescents.
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Blood cadmium and lead and chronic kidney disease in US adults: a joint analysis.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2009
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Environmental cadmium and lead exposures are widespread, and both metals are nephrotoxic at high exposure levels. Few studies have evaluated the associations between low-level cadmium and clinical renal outcomes, particularly with respect to joint cadmium and lead exposure. The geometric mean levels of blood cadmium and lead were 0.41 microg/L (3.65 nmol/L) and 1.58 microg/dL (0.076 micromol/L), respectively, in 14,778 adults aged >or=20 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2006). After adjustment for survey year, sociodemographic factors, chronic kidney disease risk factors, and blood lead, the odds ratios for albuminuria (>or=30 mg/g creatinine), reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (<60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2)), and both albuminuria and reduced eGFR were 1.92 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.53, 2.43), 1.32 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.68), and 2.91 (95% CI: 1.76, 4.81), respectively, comparing the highest with the lowest blood cadmium quartiles. The odds ratios comparing participants in the highest with the lowest quartiles of both cadmium and lead were 2.34 (95% CI: 1.72, 3.18) for albuminuria, 1.98 (95% CI: 1.27, 3.10) for reduced eGFR, and 4.10 (95% CI: 1.58, 10.65) for both outcomes. These findings support consideration of cadmium and lead as chronic kidney disease risk factors in the general population and provide novel evidence of risk with environmental exposure to both metals.
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Longitudinal associations between lead dose and renal function in lead workers.
Environ. Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-13-2009
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Existing research on the lead dose range associated with nephrotoxicity in the occupational setting is inconsistent and primarily cross-sectional in design.
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Urine arsenic and prevalent albuminuria: evidence from a population-based study.
Am. J. Kidney Dis.
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Long-term arsenic exposure is a major global health problem. However, few epidemiologic studies have evaluated the association of arsenic with kidney measures. Our objective was to evaluate the cross-sectional association between inorganic arsenic exposure and albuminuria in American Indian adults from rural areas of Arizona, Oklahoma, and North and South Dakota.
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Associations of multiple metals with kidney outcomes in lead workers.
Occup Environ Med
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Environmental exposure to multiple metals is common. A number of metals cause nephrotoxicity with acute and/or chronic exposure. However, few epidemiologic studies have examined the impact of metal coexposure on kidney function. Therefore, the authors evaluated associations of antimony and thallium with kidney outcomes and assessed the impact of cadmium exposure on those associations in lead workers.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.