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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Weight variation in users of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system and a copper intrauterine device for up to ten years of use.
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2014
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Background and objective Data on record regarding weight variation in depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) users are controversial. To date, no studies have yet evaluated weight variation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users in up to ten years of use compared to non-hormonal contraceptive users. Materials and methods A retrospective study analysed weight variations in 2138 women using uninterruptedly DMPA (150 mg intramuscularly, three-monthly; n = 714), the LNG-IUS (n = 701) or a copper-intrauterine device (Cu-IUD; n = 723). Results At the end of the first year of use, there was a mean weight increase of 1.3 kg, 0.7 kg and 0.2 kg among the DMPA-, LNG-IUS- and Cu-IUD users, respectively, compared to weight at baseline (p < 0.0001). After ten years of use, the mean weight had risen by 6.6 kg, 4.0 and 4.9 kg among the DMPA-, LNG-IUS- and Cu-IUD users, respectively. DMPA-users had gained more weight than LNG-IUS- (p = 0.0197) and than Cu-IUD users (p = 0.0294), with the latter two groups not differing significantly from each other in this respect (p = 0.5532). Conclusion Users of hormonal and non-hormonal contraceptive methods gained a significant amount of weight over the years. DMPA users gained more weight over the treatment period of up to ten years than women fitted with either a LNG-IUS or a Cu-IUD.
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Body composition and weight gain in new users of the three-monthly injectable contraceptive, depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate, after 12 months of follow-up.
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2014
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Abstract Objectives To evaluate weight gain and body composition (BC) in new users of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) as a contraceptive. Methods This cohort study followed up 20 DMPA users and 20 copper intrauterine device (TCu380A IUD) users, paired for age (± 1 year) and body mass index (BMI ± 1 kg/m(2)), during 12-months. Healthy, non-obese women aged 18 to 40 years, unaffected by conditions that could influence their body weight, were enrolled. Socio-demographic variables, habits, weight, BMI, BC using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, circumferences, skinfold thickness, body fat percentage and waist-to-hip ratio were evaluated. All participants were encouraged to adopt healthy habits. Results At baseline, median age was 29 and 30.5 years, and mean BMI was 24.8 and 24.5 kg/m(2) in the DMPA and IUD groups, respectively. At 12 months, an increase was observed in waist and hip circumference in the DMPA users and 8/20 of them had a weight gain ? 5% (mean 4.6 kg) with accumulation of fat centrally. Conclusions There were no differences in weight gain or in BC measurements between the groups; nevertheless 40% of women in the DMPA group had larger weight gain and accumulation of fat centrally. The duration of follow-up may have been insufficient to detect differences between the groups.
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Exploratory study of the effect of lifestyle counselling on bone mineral density and body composition in users of the contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate.
Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care
PUBLISHED: 06-13-2014
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To compare variations in bone mineral density (BMD) and body composition (BC) in depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) users and nonusers after providing counselling on healthy lifestyle habits.
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A randomized clinical trial of the effect of intensive versus non-intensive counselling on discontinuation rates due to bleeding disturbances of three long-acting reversible contraceptives.
Hum. Reprod.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2014
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Does intensive counselling before insertion and throughout the first year of use have any influence on discontinuation rates due to unpredictable menstrual bleeding in users of three long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)?
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Reasons for Brazilian women to switch from different contraceptives to long-acting reversible contraceptives.
Contraception
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2013
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Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) include the copper-releasing intrauterine device (IUD), the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) and implants. Despite the high contraceptive efficacy of LARCs, their prevalence of use remains low in many countries. The objective of this study was to assess the main reasons for switching from contraceptive methods requiring daily or monthly compliance to LARC methods within a Brazilian cohort.
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Effect of hormonal contraceptives during breastfeeding on infants milk ingestion and growth.
Fertil. Steril.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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To measure infants breast milk intake and infant growth when their mothers initiated either combined oral contraceptive (COC), levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, or etonogestrel-releasing implant, or copper intrauterine device (IUD) as a reference group.
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Relationship between chronic pelvic pain and functional constipation in women of reproductive age.
J Reprod Med
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2011
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To evaluate the effect of functional constipation on women with and without chronic pelvic pain (CPP).
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.