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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The effect of selected plant extracts on the development of single-species dental biofilms.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2014
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To determine the effect of a mixture of plant extracts on the adherence and retention of bacteria in dental biofilm.
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Growth inhibitory response and ultrastructural modification of oral-associated candidal reference strains (ATCC) by Piper betle L. extract.
Int J Oral Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2014
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Candida species have been associated with the emergence of strains resistant to selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease mucosal fungal infections. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Piper betle extract on the growth profile and the ultrastructure of commonly isolated oral candidal cells. The major component of P. betle was identified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (LC-MS/MS). Seven ATCC control strains of Candida species were cultured in yeast peptone dextrose broth under four different growth environments: (i) in the absence of P. betle extract; and in the presence of P. betle extract at respective concentrations of (ii) 1 mg?mL(-1); (iii) 3 mg?mL(-1); and (iv) 6 mg?mL(-1). The growth inhibitory responses of the candidal cells were determined based on changes in the specific growth rates (µ). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe any ultrastructural alterations in the candida colonies. LC-MS/MS was performed to validate the presence of bioactive compounds in the extract. Following treatment, it was observed that the µ-values of the treated cells were significantly different than those of the untreated cells (P<0.05), indicating the fungistatic properties of the P. betle extract. The candidal population was also reduced from an average of 13.44×10(6) to 1.78×10(6) viable cell counts (CFU)?mL(-1). SEM examination exhibited physical damage and considerable morphological alterations of the treated cells. The compound profile from LC-MS/MS indicated the presence of hydroxybenzoic acid, chavibetol and hydroxychavicol in P. betle extract. The effects of P. betle on candida cells could potentiate its antifungal activity.
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Antifungal susceptibility and growth inhibitory response of oral Candida species to Brucea javanica Linn. extract.
BMC Complement Altern Med
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2013
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Candida species have been associated with the emergence of resistant strains towards selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease candidal infections. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antifungal susceptibility patterns and growth inhibiting effect of Brucea javanica seeds extract against Candida species.
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Effect of Piper betle and Brucea javanica on the Differential Expression of Hyphal Wall Protein (HWP1) in Non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) Species.
Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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The study aimed to identify the HWP1 gene in non-Candida albicans Candida species and the differential expression of HWP1 following treatment with Piper betle and Brucea javanica aqueous extracts. All candidal suspensions were standardized to 1 × 10(6)?cells/mL. The suspension was incubated overnight at 37?°C (C. parapsilosis, 35°C). Candidal cells were treated with each respective extract at 1, 3, and 6?mg/mL for 24?h. The total RNA was extracted and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out with a specific primer of HWP1. HWP1 mRNAs were only detected in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. Exposing the cells to the aqueous extracts has affected the expression of HWP1 transcripts. C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis have demonstrated different intensity of mRNA. Compared to P. betle, B. javanica demonstrated a higher suppression on the transcript levels of HWP1 in all samples. HWP1 was not detected in C. albicans following the treatment of B. javanica at 1?mg/mL. In contrast, C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis were shown to have HWP1 regulation. However, the expression levels were reduced upon the addition of higher concentration of B. javanica extract. P. betle and B. javanica have potential to be developed as oral health product.
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An in vitro study on the anti-adherence effect of Brucea javanica and Piper betle extracts towards oral Candida.
Arch. Oral Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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The adherence of Candida to mucosal surfaces is the initial step for successful invasive process of the oral cavity. The study aimed to investigate the effect of two plant extracts on the non-specific and specific bindings of oral candida.
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Effect of phenotypic switching on the biological properties and susceptibility to chlorhexidine in Candida krusei ATCC 14243.
FEMS Yeast Res.
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Phenotypic switching is characterized as a virulence factor of Candida spp. This study was carried out to evaluate the phenotypic switching ability of C. krusei ATCC 14243 and to determine its effect on the biological properties, adherence capacity and susceptibility towards chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX). To induce switched generations C. krusei was cultured under nitrogen-depleted growth conditions by adding phloxine B. These phenotypically switched colonies were designated as the 1st generation. Subsequent sub-culturing was performed to produce the 2nd, 3rd and 4th switched generations. The recovery of the 3rd generation was the highest at 85.7% while that of the 4th generation was lower at 70.8%, and the recovery of the 1st and 2nd generations gradually reduced to 46.6% and 36.4%, respectively. All generations of C. krusei were susceptible towards CHX. The unswitched C. krusei was the most susceptible but the least adherent to coated hard surfaces. The 2nd generation was the least susceptible, but with the highest adherent ability. The minimum inhibition concentration and minimal fungicidal concentration of C. krusei of all generations were determined at 0.4 mg mL(-1) . These observations suggest that the switching activity of C. krusei induces changes to its biological properties and susceptibility towards CHX.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.