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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
L-3-n-butylphthalide improves cognitive impairment of APP/PS1 mice by BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/AKT pathway.
Int J Clin Exp Med
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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L-3-n-butylphthalide (L-NBP), an extract from seeds of Apium graveolens Linn (Chinese celery), has been shown to have neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemic, vascular dementia and amyloid-beta (Abeta)-induced animal models by inhibiting oxidative injury, neuronal apoptosis and glial activation, regulating amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) processing and reducing Abeta generation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of L-3-n-butylphthalide on memory impairment and the expression of brain neurotrophic derived factor (BNDF), kinaseB (TrkB), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt in APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse models. APP/PS1 double transgenic mice were administered 30 mg/kg•d L-NBP and 10 mg/kg•d L-NBP for one month. The learning and memory ability were studied using the water maze test. Protein expression and transcript levels of genes in the mice hippocampus were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively. The results demonstrated that both 30 mg/kg•d L-NBP and 10 mg/kg•d L-NBP doses of L-NBP significantly increased memory capability and the expression of hippocampal BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/AKT in mice The results suggested that L-NBP treatment may reverse memory impairment in APP/PS1 transgenic mice, and BDNF/TrkB/PI3K/AKT, may be involved in this process.
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Kasstasin: A novel potent vasoconstrictor peptide from the skin secretion of the African red-legged running frog, Kassina maculata.
Biochimie
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2011
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Amphibian skin secretions are established sources of bioactive peptides. Here we describe the isolation, structural and pharmacological characterisation of a novel vasoconstrictor peptide from the skin secretion of the African hyperoliid frog, Kassina maculata, which exhibits no structural similarity to any known class of amphibian skin peptide. The peptide consists of 21 amino acid residues, FIKELLPHLSGIIDSVANAIK, and is C-terminally amidated. The provisional structure was obtained by MS/MS fragmentation using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer and L/I ambiguities were resolved following molecular cloning of biosynthetic precursor-encoding cDNA. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to possess weak antimicrobial and haemolytic activities but was exceptionally effective in constricting the smooth muscle of rat tail artery (EC(50) of 25 pM). In reflection of its exceptional potency in constricting rat arterial smooth muscle, the peptide was named kasstasin, a derivation of Kassina and "stasis" (stoppage of flow). These data illustrate the continuing potential of amphibian skin secretions to provide novel natural peptide templates for biological evaluation.
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G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis induced by manganese chloride on cultured rat astrocytes and protective effects of riluzole.
Biol Trace Elem Res
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2011
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Occupational or environmental exposure to excessive Mn would cause manganism, which is resembled Parkinson disease. However, the mechanism underlying manganism is still unknown. It had been documented that astrocytes play important roles in physiological function in brain. Therefore, in the present study, the cultured astrocytes were exposed to 0, 125, 250, and 500 ?M MnCl(2), and cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, morphological change, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis were determined. In addition, 100 ?M riluzole (a glutamatergic modulator) was pretreated for 6 h before no MnCl(2) exposure or 500 ?M MnCl(2) exposure. The results showed that cell viability inhibited, LDH leakage elevated, morphology injured, G(0)/G(1) phase cell cycle arrested, and apoptosis rate increased in a concentration-dependent manner. Further investigation indicated that riluzole pretreatment reversed cytotoxicity, cell cycle aberration, and apoptosis on astrocytes caused by MnCl(2). These results suggested that MnCl(2) could cause cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis concentration-dependently; riluzole might antagonize Mn toxicity on astrocytes.
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Pharmacokinetic properties and bioequivalence of two compound formulations of 1500 mg ampicillin (1167 mg)/probenecid (333 mg): a randomized-sequence, single-dose, open-label, two-period crossover study in healthy Chinese male volunteers.
Clin Ther
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Ampicillin/probenecid is an antimicrobial formulation indicated for the treatment of respiratory, urinary tract, and gastrointestinal infections. Ampicillin sodium is the active antimicrobial ingredient that can act on the phase of bacterial breeding and inhibit the biosynthesis of bacterial mucopeptide in the cell wall. Probenecid acts synergistically by competitively inhibiting an organic anion transporter in renal tubules, increasing the plasma concentrations, and thus extending the plasma elimination t(1/2).
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The protective effects of riluzole on manganese-induced disruption of glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase in the cultured astrocytes.
Biol Trace Elem Res
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Chronic exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) can lead to manganism, a type of neurotoxicity accomplished with extracellular glutamate (Glu) accumulation. To investigate this accumulation, this study focused on the role of astrocyte glutamate transporters (GluTs) and glutamine synthetase (GS), which have roles in Glu transport and metabolism, respectively. And the possible protective effects of riluzole (a glutamatergic modulator) were studied in relation to Mn exposure. At first, the astrocytes were exposed to 0, 125, 250, and 500 ?M MnCl(2) for 24 h, and 100 ?M riluzole was pretreated to astrocytes for 6 h before 500 ?M MnCl(2) exposure. Then, [(3)H]-glutamate uptake was measured by liquid scintillation counting; Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and GS activities were determined by a colorimetric method; glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), and GS mRNA expression were determined by RT-PCR and protein levels were measured by western blotting. The results showed that Mn inhibited Glu uptake, Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and GS activities, GLAST, GLT-1, and GS mRNA, and protein in a concentration-dependent manner. And they were significantly higher for astrocytes pretreated with 100 ?M riluzole than the group exposed to 500 ?M MnCl(2). The results suggested that Mn disrupted Glu transport and metabolism by inhibiting GluTs and GS. Riluzole activated protective effects on enhancing GluTs and GS to reverse Glu accumulation. In conclusion, Mn exposure results in the disruption of GLAST, GLT-1, and GS expression and function. Furthermore, riluzole attenuates this Mn toxicity.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.