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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Knowledge of and interest in using preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among men who have sex with men in Thailand.
J Int Assoc Provid AIDS Care
PUBLISHED: 05-24-2013
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Little is known about HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) acceptability among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Thailand. The authors recruited an online convenience sample of Thai MSM (n = 404) to assess the knowledge of and interest in PrEP. Less than 7% had heard of PrEP; however, 35% indicated interest in PrEP after an explanation of its possible efficacy. Regression modeling demonstrated that HIV knowledge and risk behavior, but not demographics, are significant predictors of PrEP interest. More information and education about PrEP is necessary and more research is needed to examine PrEP acceptability and to inform the message for PrEP uptake.
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HIV prevalence, risk behavior, hormone use and surgical history among transgender persons in Thailand.
AIDS Behav
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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While Male-to-female transgender persons (TG) are believed to often engage in sex work and have high HIV infection risk, little is known about demographics, surgical and hormone use history, risk behaviors and HIV prevalence. Between March and October 2005, 474 TG from Bangkok, Chiangmai, and Phuket were surveyed using venue-day-time sampling. Of 474 participants, overall HIV prevalence was 13.5%. Most participants had completed at least secondary or vocational education (79.2%), gender self-identified as female (89.0%), had received money, gifts or valuables for sex (60.8%), and reported hormone use (88.6%). Surgical history was taken from 325 participants. Of these, 68.6% reported some form of surgery and 11.1% had undergone penile-vaginal reconstructive surgery. In multivariate analysis, being recruited from a park/street; older age, anal sex role identification as "versatile" and anal sex debut before age 13 were independently associated with HIV prevalence. The development, implementation and evaluation of culturally appropriate sexual health interventions for Thai TG is urgently needed.
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Sex frequency and sex planning among men who have sex with men in Bangkok, Thailand: implications for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection.
J Int AIDS Soc
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2010
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Daily HIV antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is being evaluated in clinical trials among men who have sex with men (MSM). However, daily PrEP may not be congruent with sexual exposure profiles of MSM. Here, we investigate sex frequency and sex planning to identify and inform appropriate PrEP strategies for MSM.
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Trends in HIV Prevalence, Estimated HIV Incidence, and Risk Behavior Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Bangkok, Thailand, 2003-2007.
J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2009
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BACKGROUND:: Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be at high risk for HIV infection. Here we evaluate trends in HIV prevalence, estimated HIV incidence, and risk behavior among MSM in Bangkok, Thailand. METHODS:: Between 2003 and 2007, 3 biennial cross-sectional HIV prevalence assessments were conducted among MSM in Bangkok, Thailand, using venue-day-time sampling. Oral fluid was tested for HIV infection; demographic and behavioral data were self-collected using hand-held computers. Estimates of annual HIV incidence in young MSM were derived as follows: (number of HIV infections/sum of [current age-age at start of anal intercourse]) x 100). Logistic and Poisson regression was used to evaluate trends in HIV prevalence, estimated HIV incidence, and risk behavior. FINDINGS:: The overall HIV prevalence increased from 17.3% in 2003 to 28.3% in 2005 to 30.8% in 2007 (P < 0.001 for trend). The estimated HIV incidence among young MSM increased from 4.1% in 2003 to 6.4% in 2005, to 7.7% in 2007 (P < 0.02 for trend). The increase in HIV prevalence from 2005 to 2007 was not statistically significant. The proportion of men reporting anal sex and casual or steady male sex partners in the past 3 months significantly decreased, whereas the proportion reporting drug use and drug use during sex significantly increased. No increase was observed in the proportion of men reporting consistent condom use. INTERPRETATION:: Our data suggest that after a strong increase from 2003 to 2005, the HIV prevalence among MSM in Bangkok may have begun to stabilize. Given the continuing high levels of risk behavior and the estimated high HIV incidence in young MSM, additional HIV preventive interventions are necessary.
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Sexual behavior and risk factors for HIV infection among homosexual and bisexual men in Thailand.
AIDS Behav
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2009
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HIV prevalence and associated risk behaviors were examined among Thai bisexually active men (MSMW, n = 450) and men who have sex with men only (MSM-only, n = 1,125). Cross sectional venue-day-time sampling was used to collect data. Chi-square and logistic regression were used to identify HIV risk factors. HIV prevalence was 8.2% among MSMW and 21.2% among MSM-only. Consistent condom use with male partners was higher among MSMW (77.6%) than MSM-only (62.9%), and lower with female partners (44.4%). Lack of family confidant, migration, concern about acquiring HIV infection, and self-reported STD were associated with HIV prevalence among MSMW. Older age, lower educational level, residing in Bangkok or Chiang Mai, living away from family, recruitment from a sauna, increased frequency of visiting the surveyed venue, practicing receptive or both receptive and insertive anal intercourse, inconsistent condom use with male paying partners, and a history of drug use were associated with HIV prevalence in MSM-only.
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Correlates of forced sex among populations of men who have sex with men in Thailand.
Arch Sex Behav
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2009
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Although forced sex is a correlate of HIV infection, its prevalence and associated risks are not well described among men who have sex with men (MSM) in developing-country settings. Between March and October 2005, we assessed the prevalence of forced sex and correlates among populations of MSM (this includes general MSM, male sex workers, and male-to-female transgender persons) in Thailand using a community-based sample. Participants were enrolled from venues around Bangkok, Chiangmai, and Phuket using venue day-time sampling. Handheld computer-assisted self-interviewing was used to collect demographic and behavioral data and logistic regression evaluated factors associated with forced sex, defined as ever being forced to have sexual intercourse against ones will. Of the 2,049 participants (M age, 24.8 years), a history of forced sex was reported by 376 (18.4%) men and, of these, most were forced by someone they knew (83.8%), forced more than once (67.3%), and had first occurrence during adolescence (55.1%). In multivariate analysis, having a history of forced sex was significantly associated with being recruited in Phuket, classification as general MSM or transgender (versus classification as male sex worker), drug use, increased number of male sexual partners, and buying sex. The findings in our assessment were consistent with assessments from Western countries. Longitudinal studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of the relationships between forced sex correlates found in our assessment and HIV acquisition and transmission risks.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.