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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Ultrafast relaxation dynamics of phosphine-protected, rod-shaped Au20 clusters: interplay between solvation and surface trapping.
Phys Chem Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2014
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The exact interaction between Au cores and surface ligands remains largely unknown because of the complexity of the structure and chemistry of ligand/Au-core interfaces in ligand-protected Au nanoclusters (AuNCs), which are commonly found in many organic-inorganic complexes. Here, femtosecond transient absorption measurement of the excited-state dynamics of a newly synthesized phosphine-protected cluster [Au20(PPhpy2)10Cl4]Cl2 (1) is reported. Intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) from the Au core to the peripheral ligands was identified. Furthermore, we found that solvation strongly affected ICT at ligand/Au-core interfaces while by choosing several typical alcoholic solvents with different intrinsic solvation times, we successfully observed that excited-state relaxation dynamics together with displacive excited coherent oscillation of Au20 clusters were significantly modulated through the competition between solvation and surface trapping. The results provide a fundamental understanding of the structure-property relationships of the solvation-dependent core-shell interaction of AuNCs for the potential applications in catalysis, sensing and nanoelectronics.
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Aggregation effects on the optical emission of 1,1,2,3,4,5-hexaphenylsilole (HPS): a QM/MM study.
J Phys Chem A
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2014
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We investigate the photophysical property for 1,1,2,3,4,5-hexaphenylsilole (HPS) through combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations. Under the displaced harmonic oscillator approximation with consideration of the Duschinsky rotation effect (DRE), the radiative and nonradiative rates of the excited-state decay processes for HPS are calculated by using the analytical vibration correlation function approach coupled with first-principles calculations. The intermolecular packing effect is incorporated through electrostatic interaction modeled by a force field. We find that from the gas phase to the solid state (i) the side phenyl ring at the 5-position becomes coplanar with the central silacycle, which increases the degree of conjugation, thus accelerating the radiative decay process, and (ii) the rotation of the side phenyl ring at the 2-position is restricted, which blocks the excited-state nonradiative decay channels. Such a synergetic effect largely enhances the solid-state luminescence quantum efficiency through reducing the nonradiative decay rate by about 4 orders of magnitude, leading to the radiative decay overwhelming the nonradiatvie decay. In addition, the calculated solid-phase absorption and emission optical spectra of HPS are found to be in agreement with the experiment.
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Tetrahydro[5]helicene-based imide dyes with intense fluorescence in both solution and solid state.
Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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A new kind of tetrahydro[5]helicene-based imide dyes with intense fluorescence and large Stokes shifts in both solution and solid state were developed and theoretically investigated.
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Intramolecular charge transfer and solvation dynamics of thiolate-protected Au20(SR)16 clusters studied by ultrafast measurement.
J Phys Chem A
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2013
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It is accepted that the monolayer ligand shell in monolayer-protected gold nanoclusters (MPCs) plays an important role in stabilizing the metal core structure. Previous reports have shown that the core and shell do not interact chemically, and very few studies investigating the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) between the core and ligand shell in clusters have been reported. The underlying excited state relaxation mechanisms about the influence of solvents, the optically excited vibration, and the roles of the core and shell in charge transfer remain unknown to a large extent. Here we report a femtosecond transient absorption study of a Au20(SR)16 (R = CH2CH2Ph) cluster in toluene and tetrahydrofuran. The ICT from the outside shell to the inside core upon excitation in Au20(SR)16 is identified. The observed solvation-dependent oscillations in different solvents further confirm the photoinduced ICT formation in Au20(SR)16. The results provide a fundamental understanding of the structure-property relationships about the solvation-dependent core-shell interaction in Au MPCs.
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Theoretical study of substitution effects on molecular reorganization energy in organic semiconductors.
J Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2011
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Chemical substitutions are powerful molecular design tools to enhance the performance of organic semiconductors, for instance, to improve solubility, intermolecular stacking, or film quality. However, at the microscopic level, substitutions in general tend to increase the molecular reorganization energy and thus decrease the intrinsic charge-carrier mobility. Through density functional theory calculations, we elucidate strategies that could be followed to reduce the reorganization energy upon chemical substitution. Specific examples are given here for hole-transport materials including indolo-carbazoles and several triarylamine derivatives. Through decomposition of the total reorganization energy into the internal coordinate space, we are able to identify the molecular segment that provides the most important contributions to the reorganization energy. It is found that when substitution reduces (enhances) the amplitude of the relevant frontier molecular orbital in that segment, the total reorganization energy decreases (increases). In particular, chlorination at appropriate positions can significantly reduce the reorganization energy. Several other substituents are shown to play a similar role, to a greater or lesser extent.
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Theoretical study of radiative and non-radiative decay processes in pyrazine derivatives.
J Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 07-13-2011
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Aggregation-induced emission (AIE) phenomenon has attracted much attention in recent years due to its potential applications in optoelectronic devices, fluorescence sensors, and biological probes. Restriction of intramolecular rotation has been proposed as the cause of this unusual phenomenon. Rational design of AIE luminogens requires quantitative descriptions of its mechanism. 2,3-dicyano-5,6-diphenylpyrazine (DCDPP) with "free" phenyl rings is an AIE active compound, whereas 2,3-dicyanopyrazino [5,6-9,10] phenanthrene (DCPP) with "locked" phenyl rings is not. Quantum chemistry calculations coupled with our thermal vibration correlation function formalism for the radiative and non-radiative decay rates reveal that the radiative decay rates for both DCPP and DCDPP are close to each other for all the temperatures, but the non-radiative decay processes are very different. For DCDPP, the low-frequency modes originated from the phenyl ring twisting motions are strongly coupled with the electronic excited state, which dissipate the electronic excitation energy through mode-mixing (Duschinsky rotation effect), and the non-radiative decay rate strongly increases with temperature. For DCPP, however, such mode-mixing effect is weak and the non-radiative decay rate is insensitive to temperature. These findings rationalize the fact that DCDPP is AIE active but DCPP is not, and are instructive to further development of AIE luminogens.
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The role of the n?* 1A(u) state in the photoabsorption and relaxation of pyrazine.
Chem Asian J
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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The geometric, energetic, and spectroscopic properties of the ground state and the lowest four singlet excited states of pyrazine have been studied by using DFT/TD-DFT, CASSCF, CASPT2, and related quantum chemical calculations. The second singlet n?* state, (1)A(u), which is conventionally regarded dark due to the dipole-forbidden (1)A(u)?(1)A(g) transition, has been investigated in detail. Our new simulation has shown that the state could be visible in the absorption spectrum by intensity borrowing from neighboring n?* (1)B(3u) and ??* (1)B(2u) states through vibronic coupling. The scans on potential-energy surfaces further indicated that the (1)A(u) state intersects with the (1)B(2u) states near the equilibrium of the latter, thus implying its participation in the ultrafast relaxation process.
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Theoretical predictions of red and near-infrared strongly emitting X-annulated rylenes.
J Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2011
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The optical properties of rylenes are extremely interesting because their emission colors can be tuned from blue to near-infrared by simply elongating the chain length. However, for conjugated chains, the dipole-allowed odd-parity 1B(u) excited state often lies above the dipole-forbidden even-parity 2A(g) state as the chain length increases, thus preventing any significant luminescence according to Kashas rule. We systemically investigated the 1B(u)?2A(g) crossover behaviors with respect to the elongating rylene chain length with various quantum chemistry approaches, such as time-depended density functional theory (TDDFT), complete active space self-consistent field theory (CASSCF?CASPT2), multireference configuration interaction (MRCI)?Zerners intermediate neglect of diatomic overlap (ZINDO), and MRCI?modified neglect of differential overlap. The calculated results by CASSCF?CASPT2 and MRCI?ZINDO are completely coherent: the optical active 1B(u) state lies below the dark B(3g) or 2A(g) state for perylene and terrylene, which results in strong fluorescence; while a crossover to S(1) = 2A(g) occurs and leads to much weaker fluorescence for quaterrylene. Then we put forward a molecular design rule on how to recover fluorescence for the longer rylenes by introducing heteroatom bridges. Several heteroatom-annulated rylenes are designed theoretically, which are predicted to be strongly emissive in the red and near-infrared ranges. These are further confirmed by theoretical emission spectra as well as radiative and nonradiative decay rate calculations by using the vibration correlation function formalisms we developed earlier coupled with TDDFT.
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Theory of excited state decays and optical spectra: application to polyatomic molecules.
J Phys Chem A
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2010
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General formalism of absorption and emission spectra, and of radiative and nonradiative decay rates are derived using a thermal vibration correlation function formalism for the transition between two adiabatic electronic states in polyatomic molecules. Displacements, distortions, and Duschinsky rotation of potential energy surfaces are included within the framework of a multidimensional harmonic oscillator model. The Herzberg-Teller (HT) effect is also taken into account. This formalism gives a reliable description of the Q(x) spectral band of free-base porphyrin with weakly electric dipole-allowed transitions. For the strongly dipole-allowed transitions, e.g., S(1) --> S(0) and S(0) --> S(1) of linear polyacenes, anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene, the HT effect is found to enhance the radiative decay rates by approximately 10% compared to those without the HT effect. For nonradiative transition processes, a general formalism is presented to extend the application scope of the internal conversion theory by going beyond the promoting-mode approximation. Numerical calculations for the nonradiative S(1) --> S(0) decay rate of azulene well explain the origin of the violation of Kashas rule. When coupled with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the present approach appears to be an effective tool to obtain a quantitative description and detailed understanding of spectra and photophysical processes in polyatomic molecules.
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Quantum chemical insights into the aggregation induced emission phenomena: a QM/MM study for pyrazine derivatives.
J Comput Chem
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There have been intensive studies on the newly discovered phenomena called aggregation induced emission (AIE), in contrast to the conventional aggregation quenching. Through combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics computations, we have investigated the aggregation effects on the excited state decays, both via radiative and nonradiative routes, for pyrazine derivatives 2,3-dicyano-5,6-diphenylpyrazine (DCDPP) and 2,3-dicyanopyrazino phenanthrene (DCPP) in condensed phase. We show that for DCDPP there appear AIE for all the temperature, because the phenyl ring torsional motions in gas phase can efficiently dissipate the electronic excited state energy, and get hindered in aggregate; while for its "locked"-phenyl counterpart, DCPP, theoretical calculation can only give the normal aggregation quenching. These first-principles based findings are consistent with recent experiment. The primary origin of the exotic AIE phenomena is due to the nonradiative decay effects. This is the first time that AIE is understood based on theoretical chemistry calculations for aggregates, which helps to resolve the present disputes over the mechanism.
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Theoretical insight into the aggregation induced emission phenomena of diphenyldibenzofulvene: a nonadiabatic molecular dynamics study.
Phys Chem Chem Phys
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The diphenyldibenzofulvene (DPDBF) molecule appears in two forms: ring open and ring closed. The former fluoresces weakly in solution, but it becomes strongly emissive in the solid phase, exhibiting an exotic aggregation-induced emission phenomenon. The latter presents a normal aggregation quenching phenomenon, as is expected. We implement nonadiabatic molecular dynamics based on the combination of time-dependent Kohn-Sham (TDKS) and density functional tight binding (DFTB) methods with Tullys fewest switches surface hopping algorithm to investigate the excited state nonradiative decay processes. From the analysis of the nonadiabatic coupling vectors, it is found that the low frequency twisting motion in the ring open DPDBF couples strongly with the electronic excitation and dissipates the energy efficiently. While in the closed form, such motion is blocked by a chemical bond. This leads to the nonradiative decay rate for the open form (1.4 ps) becoming much faster than the closed form (24.5 ps). It is expected that, in the solid state, the low frequency motion of the open form will be hindered and the energy dissipation pathway by nonradiative decay will be slowed, presenting a remarkable aggregation enhanced emission phenomenon.
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Theoretical insights into the aggregation-induced emission by hydrogen bonding: a QM/MM study.
J Phys Chem A
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We investigate the excited-state decay processes for the 3-(2-cyano-2- phenylethenyl-Z)-NH-indole (CPEI) in the solid phase through combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) and vibration correlation formalisms for radiative and nonradiative decay rates, coupled with time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). By comparing the isolated CPEI molecule and the molecule-in-cluster, we show that the molecular packing through intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions can hinder the excited-state nonradiative decay and thus enhance the fluorescence efficiency in the solid phase. Aggregation effect is shown to block the nonradiative decay process through hindering the low-frequency vibration motions. The fluorescence quantum yields for both isolated molecule and aggregation are predicted to be insensitive to temperature due to the hydrogen-bonding nature, and their values at room temperature are consistent with the experiment.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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