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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Auxin overproduction in shoots cannot rescue auxin deficiencies in Arabidopsis roots.
Plant Cell Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2014
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Auxin plays an essential role in root development. It has been a long-held dogma that auxin required for root development is mainly transported from shoots into roots by polarly localized auxin transporters. However, it is known that auxin is also synthesized in roots. Here we demonstrate that a group of YUCCA (YUC) genes, which encode the rate-limiting enzymes for auxin biosynthesis, plays an essential role in Arabidopsis root development. Five YUC genes (YUC3, YUC5, YUC7, YUC8 and YUC9) display distinct expression patterns during root development. Simultaneous inactivation of the five YUC genes (yucQ mutants) leads to the development of very short and agravitropic primary roots. The yucQ phenotypes are rescued by either adding 5 nM of the natural auxin, IAA, in the growth media or by expressing a YUC gene in the roots of yucQ. Interestingly, overexpression of a YUC gene in shoots in yucQ causes the characteristic auxin overproduction phenotypes in shoots; however, the root defects of yucQ are not rescued. Our data demonstrate that localized auxin biosynthesis in roots is required for normal root development and that auxin transported from shoots is not sufficient for supporting root elongation and root gravitropic responses.
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The jasmonic acid signaling pathway is linked to auxin homeostasis through the modulation of YUCCA8 and YUCCA9 gene expression.
Plant J.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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Interactions between phytohormones play important roles in the regulation of plant growth and development, but knowledge of the networks controlling hormonal relationships, such as between oxylipins and auxins, is just emerging. Here, we report the transcriptional regulation of two Arabidopsis YUCCA genes, YUC8 and YUC9, by oxylipins. Similar to previously characterized YUCCA family members, we show that both YUC8 and YUC9 are involved in auxin biosynthesis, as demonstrated by the increased auxin contents and auxin-dependent phenotypes displayed by gain-of-function mutants as well as the significantly decreased indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels in yuc8 and yuc8/9 knockout lines. Gene expression data obtained by qPCR analysis and microscopic examination of promoter-reporter lines reveal an oxylipin-mediated regulation of YUC9 expression that is dependent on the COI1 signal transduction pathway. In support of these findings, the roots of the analyzed yuc knockout mutants displayed a reduced response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). The similar response of the yuc8 and yuc9 mutants to MeJA in cotyledons and hypocotyls suggests functional overlap of YUC8 and YUC9 in aerial tissues, while their function in roots shows some specificity, probably in part related to different spatio-temporal expression patterns of the two genes. These results provide evidence for an intimate functional relationship between oxylipin signaling and auxin homeostasis.
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Conversion of tryptophan to indole-3-acetic acid by TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASES OF ARABIDOPSIS and YUCCAs in Arabidopsis.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2011
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Auxin is an essential hormone, but its biosynthetic routes in plants have not been fully defined. In this paper, we show that the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of amino transferases converts tryptophan to indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) and that the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases participates in converting IPA to indole-3-acetic acid, the main auxin in plants. Both the YUCs and the TAAs have been shown to play essential roles in auxin biosynthesis, but it has been suggested that they participate in two independent pathways. Here, we show that all of the taa mutant phenotypes, including defects in shade avoidance, root resistance to ethylene and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), are phenocopied by inactivating YUC genes. On the other hand, we show that the taa mutants in several known auxin mutant backgrounds, including pid and npy1, mimic all of the well-characterized developmental defects caused by combining yuc mutants with the auxin mutants. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of YUC1 partially suppresses the shade avoidance defects of taa1 and the sterile phenotypes of the weak but not the strong taa mutants. In addition, we discovered that the auxin overproduction phenotypes of YUC overexpression lines are dependent on active TAA genes. Our genetic data show that YUC and TAA work in the same pathway and that YUC is downstream of TAA. The yuc mutants accumulate IPA, and the taa mutants are partially IPA-deficient, indicating that TAAs are responsible for converting tryptophan to IPA, whereas YUCs play an important role in converting IPA to indole-3-acetic acid.
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NPY genes play an essential role in root gravitropic responses in Arabidopsis.
Mol Plant
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2010
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Plants can sense the direction of gravity and orient their growth to ensure that roots are anchored in soil and that shoots grow upward. Gravitropism has been studied extensively using Arabidopsis genetics, but the exact mechanisms for gravitropism are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that five NPY genes play a key role in Arabidopsis root gravitropism. NPY genes were previously identified as regulators of auxin-mediated organogenesis in a genetic pathway with the AGC kinases PID, PID2, WAG1, and WAG2. We show that all five NPY genes are highly expressed in primary root tips. The single npy mutants do not display obvious gravitropism defects, but the npy1 npy2 npy3 npy4 npy5 quintuple mutants show dramatic gravitropic phenotypes. Systematic analysis of all the npy double, triple, and quadruple combinations demonstrates that the five NPY genes all contribute to gravitropism. Our work indicates that gravitropism, phototropism, and organogenesis use analogous mechanisms in which at least one AGC kinase, one NPH3/NPY gene, and one ARF are required.
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REVEILLE1, a Myb-like transcription factor, integrates the circadian clock and auxin pathways.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2009
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The circadian clock modulates expression of a large fraction of the Arabidopsis genome and affects many aspects of plant growth and development. We have discovered one way in which the circadian system regulates hormone signaling, identifying a node that links the clock and auxin networks. Auxin plays key roles in development and responses to environmental cues, in part through regulation of plant growth. We have characterized REVEILLE1 (RVE1), a Myb-like, clock-regulated transcription factor that is homologous to the central clock genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY). Despite this homology, inactivation of RVE1 does not affect circadian rhythmicity but instead causes a growth phenotype, indicating this factor is a clock output affecting plant development. CCA1 regulates growth via the bHLH transcription factors PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5, but RVE1 acts independently of these genes. RVE1 instead controls auxin levels, promoting free auxin production during the day but having no effect during the night. RVE1 positively regulates the expression of the auxin biosynthetic gene YUCCA8 (YUC8), providing a mechanism for its growth-promoting effects. RVE1 is therefore a node that connects two important signaling networks that coordinate plant growth with rhythmic changes in the environment.
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An allelic mutant series of ATM3 reveals its key role in the biogenesis of cytosolic iron-sulfur proteins in Arabidopsis.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2009
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The ATP-binding cassette transporters of mitochondria (ATMs) are highly conserved proteins, but their function in plants is poorly defined. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has three ATM genes, namely ATM1, ATM2, and ATM3. Using a collection of insertional mutants, we show that only ATM3 has an important function for plant growth. Additional atm3 alleles were identified among sirtinol-resistant lines, correlating with decreased activities of aldehyde oxidases, cytosolic enzymes that convert sirtinol into an auxin analog, and depend on iron-sulfur (Fe-S) and molybdenum cofactor (Moco) as prosthetic groups. In the sirtinol-resistant atm3-3 allele, the highly conserved arginine-612 is replaced by a lysine residue, the negative effect of which could be mimicked in the yeast Atm1p ortholog. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants displayed defects in root growth, chlorophyll content, and seedling establishment. Analyses of selected metal enzymes showed that the activity of cytosolic aconitase (Fe-S) was strongly decreased across the range of atm3 alleles, whereas mitochondrial and plastid Fe-S enzymes were unaffected. Nitrate reductase activity (Moco, heme) was decreased by 50% in the strong atm3 alleles, but catalase activity (heme) was similar to that of the wild type. Strikingly, in contrast to mutants in the yeast and mammalian orthologs, Arabidopsis atm3 mutants did not display a dramatic iron homeostasis defect and did not accumulate iron in mitochondria. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis ATM3 may transport (1) at least two distinct compounds or (2) a single compound required for both Fe-S and Moco assembly machineries in the cytosol, but not iron.
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Pattern of auxin and cytokinin responses for shoot meristem induction results from the regulation of cytokinin biosynthesis by AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3.
Plant Physiol.
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De novo organ regeneration is an excellent biological system for the study of fundamental questions regarding stem cell initiation, cell fate determination, and hormone signaling. Despite the general belief that auxin and cytokinin responses interact to regulate de novo organ regeneration, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a cross talk are little understood. Here, we show that spatiotemporal biosynthesis and polar transport resulted in local auxin distribution in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which in turn determined the cytokinin response during de novo shoot regeneration. Genetic and pharmacological interference of auxin distribution disrupted the cytokinin response and ATP/ADP ISOPENTENYLTRANSFERASE5 (AtIPT5) expression, affecting stem cell initiation and meristem formation. Transcriptomic data suggested that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3) mediated the auxin response during de novo organ regeneration. Indeed, mutations in ARF3 caused ectopic cytokinin biosynthesis via the misexpression of AtIPT5, and this disrupted organ regeneration. We further showed that ARF3 directly bound to the promoter of AtIPT5 and negatively regulated AtIPT5 expression. The results from this study thus revealed an auxin-cytokinin cross talk mechanism involving distinct intermediate signaling components required for de novo stem cell initiation and shed new light on the mechanisms of organogenesis in planta.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.