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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The glutamate receptor GluN2 subunit regulates synaptic trafficking of AMPA receptors in the neonatal mouse brain.
Eur. J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 08-08-2014
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The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) plays various physiological and pathological roles in neural development, synaptic plasticity and neuronal cell death. It is composed of two GluN1 and two GluN2 subunits and, in the neonatal hippocampus, most synaptic NMDARs are GluN2B-containing receptors, which are gradually replaced with GluN2A-containing receptors during development. Here, we examined whether GluN2A could be substituted for GluN2B in neural development and functions by analysing knock-in (KI) mice in which GluN2B is replaced with GluN2A. The KI mutation was neonatally lethal, although GluN2A-containing receptors were transported to the postsynaptic membrane even without GluN2B and functional at synapses of acute hippocampal slices of postnatal day 0, indicating that GluN2A-containing NMDARs could not be substituted for GluN2B-containing NMDARs. Importantly, the synaptic ?-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunit GluA1 was increased, and the transmembrane AMPAR regulatory protein, which is involved in AMPAR synaptic trafficking, was increased in KI mice. Although the regulation of AMPARs by GluN2B has been reported in cultured neurons, we showed here that AMPAR-mediated synaptic responses were increased in acute KI slices, suggesting differential roles of GluN2A and GluN2B in AMPAR expression and trafficking in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that GluN2B is essential for the survival of animals, and that the GluN2B-GluN2A switching plays a critical role in synaptic integration of AMPARs through regulation of GluA1 in the whole animal.
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LMTK3 deficiency causes pronounced locomotor hyperactivity and impairs endocytic trafficking.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2014
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LMTK3 belongs to the LMTK family of protein kinases that are predominantly expressed in the brain. Physiological functions of LMTK3 and other members of the LMTK family in the CNS remain unknown. In this study, we performed a battery of behavioral analyses using Lmtk3(-/-) mice and showed that these mice exhibit abnormal behaviors, including pronounced locomotor hyperactivity, reduced anxiety behavior, and decreased depression-like behavior. Concurrently, the dopamine metabolite levels and dopamine turnover rate are increased in the striata of Lmtk3(-/-) mice compared with wild-type controls. In addition, using cultured primary neurons from Lmtk3(-/-) mice, we found that LMTK3 is involved in the endocytic trafficking of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, a type of ionotropic glutamate receptor. Altered membrane traffic of the receptor in Lmtk3(-/-) neurons may underlie behavioral abnormalities in the mutant animals. Together, our data suggest that LMTK3 plays an important role in regulating locomotor behavior in mice.
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NMDAR2B tyrosine phosphorylation regulates anxiety-like behavior and CRF expression in the amygdala.
Mol Brain
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2010
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Anxiety disorders are a highly prevalent and disabling class of psychiatric disorders. There is growing evidence implicating the glutamate system in the pathophysiology and treatment of anxiety disorders, though the molecular mechanism by which the glutamate system regulates anxiety-like behavior remains unclear.
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Involvement of NMDAR2A tyrosine phosphorylation in depression-related behaviour.
EMBO J.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2009
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Major depressive and bipolar disorders are serious illnesses that affect millions of people. Growing evidence implicates glutamate signalling in depression, though the molecular mechanism by which glutamate signalling regulates depression-related behaviour remains unknown. In this study, we provide evidence suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor, an ionotropic glutamate receptor, contributes to depression-related behaviour. The NR2A subunit of the NMDA receptor is tyrosine-phosphorylated, with Tyr 1325 as its one of the major phosphorylation site. We have generated mice expressing mutant NR2A with a Tyr-1325-Phe mutation to prevent the phosphorylation of this site in vivo. The homozygous knock-in mice show antidepressant-like behaviour in the tail suspension test and in the forced swim test. In the striatum of the knock-in mice, DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr 34, which is important for the regulation of depression-related behaviour, is increased. We also show that the Tyr 1325 phosphorylation site is required for Src-induced potentiation of the NMDA receptor channel in the striatum. These data argue that Tyr 1325 phosphorylation regulates NMDA receptor channel properties and the NMDA receptor-mediated downstream signalling to modulate depression-related behaviour.
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NMDAR2B tyrosine phosphorylation is involved in thermal nociception.
Neurosci. Lett.
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Previous studies found that the NMDA receptor-mediated signaling regulates thermal nociception, though the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. The GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor is tyrosine-phosphorylated, Tyr-1472 being the major phosphorylation site. In this study, we have found that homozygous knock-in mice that express a Tyr-1472-Phe mutant of GluN2B display defects in the nociceptive response in the hot plate test. Expression of the neurotensin receptor subtype 2 (NTSR2), which is relevant to the regulation of thermal nociception, is decreased in the amygdala of GluN2B Tyr-1472-Phe knock-in mice. In addition, NTSR2-mediated c-fos induction is impaired in the amygdala of these mice. These data suggest that Tyr-1472 phosphorylation on GluN2B is involved in thermal nociception through regulating the NTSR2 mRNA expression in the amygdala.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.