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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Fine-tuning of DNA damage-dependent ubiquitination by OTUB2 supports the DNA repair pathway choice.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are deleterious lesions that lead to genetic mutations and cell death. Protein ubiquitination mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF8 within the regions surrounding DSBs recruits DNA DSB response (DDR) factors and induces chromatin remodeling, which supports cell survival after DNA damage. Nevertheless, the impact of RNF8-mediated ubiquitination on DNA repair remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that depletion of the deubiquitinating enzyme OTUB2 enhances RNF8-mediated ubiquitination in an early phase of the DDR and promotes faster DSB repair but suppresses homologous recombination. The rapid ubiquitination results in accelerated accumulation of 53BP1 and RAP80 at DSBs, which in turn protects DSB ends from resection in OTUB2-depleted cells. Mechanistically, OTUB2 suppresses RNF8-mediated L3MBTL1 ubiquitination and Lys 63-linked ubiquitin chain formation in a deubiquitinating activity-dependent manner. Thus, OTUB2 fine-tunes the speed of DSB-induced ubiquitination so that the appropriate DNA repair pathway is chosen.
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The nonstructural proteins of Nipah virus play a key role in pathogenicity in experimentally infected animals.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2010
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Nipah virus (NiV) P gene encodes P protein and three accessory proteins (V, C and W). It has been reported that all four P gene products have IFN antagonist activity when the proteins were transiently expressed. However, the role of those accessory proteins in natural infection with NiV remains unknown. We generated recombinant NiVs lacking V, C or W protein, rNiV(V-), rNiV(C-), and rNiV(W-), respectively, to analyze the functions of these proteins in infected cells and the implications in in vivo pathogenicity. All the recombinants grew well in cell culture, although the maximum titers of rNiV(V-) and rNiV(C-) were lower than the other recombinants. The rNiV(V-), rNiV(C-) and rNiV(W-) suppressed the IFN response as well as the parental rNiV, thereby indicating that the lack of each accessory protein does not significantly affect the inhibition of IFN signaling in infected cells. In experimentally infected golden hamsters, rNiV(V-) and rNiV(C-) but not the rNiV(W-) virus showed a significant reduction in virulence. These results suggest that V and C proteins play key roles in NiV pathogenicity, and the roles are independent of their IFN-antagonist activity. This is the first report that identifies the molecular determinants of NiV in pathogenicity in vivo.
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CD147/EMMPRIN acts as a functional entry receptor for measles virus on epithelial cells.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Measles is a highly contagious human disease caused by measles virus (MeV) and remains the leading cause of death in children, particularly in developing countries. Wild-type MeV preferentially infects lymphocytes by using signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM), whose expression is restricted to hematopoietic cells, as a receptor. MeV also infects other epithelial and neuronal cells that do not express SLAM and causes pneumonia and diarrhea and, sometimes, serious symptoms such as measles encephalitis and subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The discrepancy between the tissue tropism of MeV and the distribution of SLAM-positive cells suggests that there are unknown receptors other than SLAM for MeV. Here we identified CD147/EMMPRIN (extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer), a transmembrane glycoprotein, which acts as a receptor for MeV on epithelial cells. Furthermore, we found the incorporation of cyclophilin B (CypB), a cellular ligand for CD147, in MeV virions, and showed that inhibition of CypB incorporation significantly attenuated SLAM-independent infection on epithelial cells, while it had no effect on SLAM-dependent infection. To date, MeV infection was considered to be triggered by binding of its hemagglutinin (H) protein and cellular receptors. Our present study, however, indicates that MeV infection also occurs via CD147 and virion-associated CypB, independently of MeV H. Since CD147 is expressed in a variety of cells, including epithelial and neuronal cells, this molecule possibly functions as an entry receptor for MeV in SLAM-negative cells. This is the first report among members of the Mononegavirales that CD147 is used as a virus entry receptor via incorporated CypB in the virions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.