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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Left-Ventricular Mechanical Activation and Aortic-Arch Orientation Recovered from Magneto-Hydrodynamic Voltages Observed in 12-Lead ECGs Obtained Inside MRIs: A Feasibility Study.
Ann Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 04-29-2014
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To explore use of the Magnetohydrodynamic Voltage (VMHD), observed in intra-MRI 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG), to indicate the timing of the onset of left-ventricular mechanical activation (LVMA) and the orientation of the aortic-arch (AAO). Blood flow through the aortic arch during systole, in the presence of the MRI magnetic field (B 0), generates VMHD. Since the magnitude and direction of VMHD are determined by the timing and directionality of blood flow relative to B 0, we hypothesized that clinically useful measures, LVMA and AAO, could be extracted from temporal and vectorial VMHD characteristics. VMHD signals were extracted from 12-lead ECG traces by comparing traces obtained inside and outside the MRI scanner. VMHD was converted into the Vectorcardiogram frame of reference. LVMA was quantified in 1 subject at 1.5T and 3 subjects at 3T, and the result compared to CINE MRI. AAO was inferred for 4 subjects at 3T and compared to anatomical imaging of the aortic arch orientation in the transverse plane. A < 10% error was observed in LVMA measurements, while a < 3° error was observed in aortic arch orientation measurements. The temporal and vectorial nature of VMHD is useful in estimating these clinically relevant parameters.
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Comparison of three artificial models of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on the electrocardiogram.
Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2014
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The electrocardiogram (ECG) is often acquired during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but its analysis is restricted by the presence of a strong artefact, called magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effect. MHD effect is induced by the flow of electrically charged particles in the blood perpendicular to the static magnetic field, which creates a potential of the order of magnitude of the ECG and temporally coincident with the repolarisation period. In this study, a new MHD model is proposed by using MRI-based 4D blood flow measurements made across the aortic arch. The model is extended to several cardiac cycles to allow the simulation of a realistic ECG acquisition during MRI examination and the quality assessment of MHD suppression techniques. A comparison of two existing models, based, respectively, on an analytical solution and on a numerical method-based solution of the fluids dynamics problem, is made with the proposed model and with an estimate of the MHD voltage observed during a real MRI scan. Results indicate a moderate agreement between the proposed model and the estimated MHD model for most leads, with an average correlation factor of 0.47. However, the results demonstrate that the proposed model provides a closer approximation to the observed MHD effects and a better depiction of the complexity of the MHD effect compared with the previously published models, with an improved correlation ([Formula: see text]), coefficient of determination ([Formula: see text]) and fraction of energy ([Formula: see text]) compared with the best previous model. The source code will be made freely available under an open source licence to facilitate collaboration and allow more rapid development of more accurate models of the MHD effect.
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An MR-conditional high-torque pneumatic stepper motor for MRI-guided and robot-assisted intervention.
Ann Biomed Eng
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2014
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Magnetic resonance imaging allows for visualizing detailed pathological and morphological changes of soft tissue. MR-conditional actuations have been widely investigated for development of image-guided and robot-assisted surgical devices under the Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This paper presents a simple design of MR-conditional stepper motor which can provide precise and high-torque actuation without adversely affecting the MR image quality. This stepper motor consists of two MR-conditional pneumatic cylinders and the corresponding supporting structures. Alternating the pressurized air can drive the motor to rotate each step in 3.6° with the motor coupled to a planetary gearbox. Experimental studies were conducted to validate its dynamics performance. Maximum 800 mN m output torque is achieved. The motor accuracy independently varied by two factors: motor operating speed and step size, was also investigated. The motor was tested within a 3T Siemens MRI scanner (MAGNETOM Skyra, Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) and a 3T GE MRI scanner (GE SignaHDx, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA). The image artifact and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were evaluated for study of its MRI compliancy. The results show that the presented pneumatic stepper motor generated 2.35% SNR reduction in MR images. No observable artifact was presented besides the motor body itself. The proposed motor test also demonstrates a standard to evaluate the pneumatic motor capability for later incorporation with motorized devices used under MRI.
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3DQRS: a method to obtain reliable QRS complex detection within high field MRI using 12-lead electrocardiogram traces.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2014
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To develop a technique that accurately detects the QRS complex in 1.5 Tesla (T), 3T, and 7T MRI scanners.
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Chinese social media reaction to the MERS-CoV and avian influenza A(H7N9) outbreaks.
Infect Dis Poverty
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
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As internet and social media use have skyrocketed, epidemiologists have begun to use online data such as Google query data and Twitter trends to track the activity levels of influenza and other infectious diseases. In China, Weibo is an extremely popular microblogging site that is equivalent to Twitter. Capitalizing on the wealth of public opinion data contained in posts on Weibo, this study used Weibo as a measure of the Chinese peoples reactions to two different outbreaks: the 2012 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak, and the 2013 outbreak of human infection of avian influenza A(H7N9) in China.
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A 1.5T MRI-conditional 12-lead electrocardiogram for MRI and intra-MR intervention.
Magn Reson Med
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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PURPOSE: High-fidelity 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is important for physiological monitoring of patients during MR-guided intervention and cardiac MRI. Issues in obtaining noncorrupted ECGs inside MRI include a superimposed magneto-hydro-dynamic voltage, gradient switching-induced voltages, and radiofrequency heating. These problems increase with magnetic field. The aim of this study is to develop and clinically validate a 1.5T MRI-conditional 12-lead ECG system. METHODS: The system was constructed with transmission lines to reduce radiofrequency induction and switching circuits to remove induced voltages. Adaptive filters, trained by 12-lead measurements outside MRI and in two orientations inside MRI, were used to remove the magneto-hydro-dynamic voltage. The system was tested on 10 (one exercising) volunteers and four arrhythmia patients. RESULTS: Switching circuits removed most imaging-induced voltages (residual noise <3% of the R-wave). Magneto-hydro-dynamic voltage removal provided intra-MRI ECGs that varied by <3.8% from those outside the MRI, preserving the true S-wave to T-wave segment. In premature ventricular contraction (PVC) patients, clean ECGs separated premature ventricular contraction and sinus rhythm beats. Measured heating was <1.5°C. The system reliably acquired multiphase (steady-state free precession) wall-motion-cine and phase-contrast-cine scans, including subjects in whom 4-lead gating failed. The system required a minimum repetition time of 4 ms to allow robust ECG processing. CONCLUSION: High-fidelity intra-MRI 12-lead ECG is possible. Magn Reson Med, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Piezoelectric actuator design for MR elastography: implementation and vibration issues.
Int J Med Robot
PUBLISHED: 04-30-2011
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BACKGROUND: MR elastography (MRE) is an emerging technique for tumor diagnosis. MRE actuation devices require precise mechanical design and radiofrequency engineering to achieve the required mechanical vibration performance and MR compatibility. METHOD: A method of designing a general-purpose, compact and inexpensive MRE actuator is presented. It comprises piezoelectric bimorphs arranged in a resonant structure designed to operate at its resonant frequency for maximum vibration amplitude. An analytical model was established to understand the device vibration characteristics. RESULTS: The model-predicted performance was validated in experiments, showing its accuracy in predicting the actuator resonant frequency with an error < 4%. The device MRI compatibility was shown to cause minimal interference to a 1.5 tesla MRI scanner, with maximum signal-to-noise ratio reduction of 7.8% and generated artefact of 7.9 mm in MR images. CONCLUSIONS: A piezoelectric MRE actuator is proposed, and its implementation, vibration issues and future work are discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Robotic system for transrectal biopsy of the prostate: real-time guidance under MRI.
IEEE Eng Med Biol Mag
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2010
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In this paper, to harness the possibility of real-time guidance of MRI, a robotic system has been developed to perform transrectal prostate biopsy inside a 1.5-T closed bore scanner. A specially developed MR pulse sequence is capable of tracking the needle location in real time while dynamically updating the scan planes to always include the needle and target.
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Magnetic resonance elastography: a general overview of its current and future applications in brain imaging.
Neurosurg Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) has been developed over the last few years as a non-invasive means of evaluating the elasticity of biological tissues. The presence of the skull has always prevented semeiotic palpation of the brain, but MRE now offers the possibility of "palpating by imaging" in order to detect brain consistency under physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this article is to review the current state-of-the-art of MRE imaging and discuss its possible future diagnostic applications in neuroscience.
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Magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensing device based on a piezoelectric array.
Proc Inst Mech Eng H
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Minimally invasive surgery is a widely used medical technique, one of the drawbacks of which is the loss of direct sense of touch during the operation. Palpation is the use of fingertips to explore and make fast assessments of tissue morphology. Although technologies are developed to equip minimally invasive surgery tools with haptic feedback capabilities, the majority focus on tissue stiffness profiling and tool-tissue interaction force measurement. For greatly increased diagnostic capability, a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible tactile sensor design is proposed, which allows minimally invasive surgery to be performed under image guidance, combining the strong capability of magnetic resonance imaging soft tissue and intuitive palpation. The sensing unit is based on a piezoelectric sensor methodology, which conforms to the stringent mechanical and electrical design requirements imposed by the magnetic resonance environment The sensor mechanical design and the device integration to a 0.2 Tesla open magnetic resonance imaging scanner are described, together with the devices magnetic resonance compatibility testing. Its design limitations and potential future improvements are also discussed. A tactile sensing unit based on a piezoelectric sensor principle is proposed, which is designed for magnetic resonance imaging guided interventions.
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Prospective motion correction using tracking coils.
Magn Reson Med
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Intracavity imaging coils provide higher signal-to-noise than surface coils and have the potential to provide higher spatial resolution in shorter acquisition times. However, images from these coils suffer from physiologically induced motion artifacts, as both the anatomy and the coils move during image acquisition. We developed prospective motion-correction techniques for intracavity imaging using an array of tracking coils. The system had <50 ms latency between tracking and imaging, so that the images from the intracavity coil were acquired in a frame of reference defined by the tracking array rather than by the systems gradient coils. Two-dimensional gradient-recalled and three-dimensional electrocardiogram-gated inversion-recovery-fast-gradient-echo sequences were tested with prospective motion correction using ex vivo hearts placed on a moving platform simulating both respiratory and cardiac motion. Human abdominal tests were subsequently conducted. The tracking array provided a positional accuracy of 0.7 ± 0.5 mm, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm, and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm along the X, Y, and Z directions at a rate of 20 frames-per-second. The ex vivo and human experiments showed significant image quality improvements for both in-plane and through-plane motion correction, which although not performed in intracavity imaging, demonstrates the feasibility of implementing such a motion-correction system in a future design of combined tracking and intracavity coil.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.