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Physics: The study of those aspects of energy and matter in terms of elementary principles and laws. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
 JoVE Engineering

Sputter Growth and Characterization of Metamagnetic B2-ordered FeRh Epilayers

1School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, 2Institute of Materials Research, University of Leeds, 3School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, 5Department of Physics, Northeastern University


JoVE 50603

 JoVE In-Press

Pulling Membrane Nanotubes from Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

1Laboratoire Physico Chimie Curie, Institut Curie, PSL Research University, 2Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, T. H. Chan School of Public Health, and Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, 3Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4Center for studies in Physics and Biology, The Rockefeller University

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JoVE 56086

 Science Education: Essentials of Physics I

Conservation of Momentum

JoVE Science Education

Source: Nicholas Timmons, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

The goal of this experiment is to test the concept of the conservation of momentum. By setting up a surface with very little friction, collisions between moving objects can be studied, including their initial and final momenta. The conservation of momentum is one of the most important laws in physics. When something is conserved in physics, the initial value is equal to the final value. For momentum, this means that the total initial momentum of a system will be equal to the total final momentum. Newton's second law states that the force on an object will be equal to the change in the object's momentum with time. This fact, combined with the idea that momentum is conserved, underpins the workings of classical mechanics and is a powerful problem-solving tool.

 Science Education: Essentials of Physics I

Vectors in Multiple Directions

JoVE Science Education

Source: Nicholas Timmons, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

This experiment demonstrates how vectors add and subtract in multiple directions. The goal will be to analytically calculate the addition or subtraction of multiple vectors and then to experimentally confirm the calculations. A vector is an object with both magnitude and direction. The magnitude of a vector is simply denoted as the length, while the direction is typically defined by the angle it makes with the x-axis. Because forces are vectors, they can be used as a physical representation of vectors. By setting up a system of forces and finding which additional force will create an equilibrium between the forces, a system of vectors can be experimentally verified.

 JoVE Behavior

Assessing the Multiple Dimensions of Engagement to Characterize Learning: A Neurophysiological Perspective

1Department of Didactics, Université du Québec à Montréal, 2Department of IT and Tech3Lab, HEC Montreal, 3Department of Marketing and Tech3Lab, HEC Montreal, 4Department of Specialized Education, Université du Québec à Montréal


JoVE 52627

 JoVE Engineering

Angle-resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy At Ultra-low Temperatures

1Institute for Solid State Research, IFW-Dresden, 2Institute of Metal Physics of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 3Diamond Light Source LTD, 4Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, 5CNR-SPIN, and Dipartimento di Fisica "E. R. Caianiello", Università di Salerno, 6Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne


JoVE 50129

 JoVE Engineering

Writing Bragg Gratings in Multicore Fibers

1Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, 2Institute of Photonics and Optical Science, School of Physics, University of Sydney, 3Center for Ultrahigh Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems, School of Physics, University of Sydney, 4Australian Astronomical Observatory


JoVE 53326

 JoVE Engineering

Fabrication of Gate-tunable Graphene Devices for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies with Coulomb Impurities

1Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, 2Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley, 3Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, 4National Institute for Materials Science (Japan), 5Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 6Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute, University of California at Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory


JoVE 52711

 Science Education: Essentials of Physics II

Reflection and Refraction

JoVE Science Education

Source: Derek Wilson, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

Light travels at different speeds depending on the material through which it is propagating. When light travels from one material to another, it will either slow down or speed up. In order to conserve energy and momentum, the light must change the direction in which it propagates. This bending of light is known as refraction. Some fraction of the light is also reflected at the interface between the two materials. In special cases, a light beam can be refracted so sharply at an interface that it is actually completely reflected back into the medium from which it was coming. Lenses make use of the principle of refraction. Lenses come in two varieties with different curvatures: convex lenses and concave lenses. Convex lenses are often used to focus light but can also be used to create magnified images of objects. When a convex lens causes the light rays coming from an object to diverge, the human eye judges the light to be coming from some point behind the actual object from which the light is originating. The image of the object will in this case be magnified. This type of image is called a virtual image. Concave

 Science Education: Essentials of Physics I

Force and Acceleration

JoVE Science Education

Source: Nicholas Timmons, Asantha Cooray, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, School of Physical Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA

The goal of this experiment is to understand the components of force and their relation to motion through the use of Newton's second law by measuring the acceleration of a glider being acted upon by a force. Nearly every aspect of motion in everyday life can be described using Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. They describe how objects in motion will tend to stay in motion (the first law), objects will accelerate when acted upon by a net force (the second law), and every force exerted by an object will have an equal and opposite force exerted back onto that object (the third law). Almost all of high school and undergraduate mechanics is based on these simple concepts.

 JoVE Engineering

Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition

1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 3School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 4Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 5Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University


JoVE 52705

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