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Biology

Population Replacement Strategies for Controlling Vector Populations and the Use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic Drive

doi: 10.3791/225 Published: July 4, 2007

Summary

In this interview, Jason Rasgon explains the concept of genetic drive and the characteristics of an effective gene drive system. The use of the endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, as a means to spread genes through mosquito populations, is hypothesized.

Abstract

In this video, Jason Rasgon discusses population replacement strategies to control vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue. "Population replacement" is the replacement of wild vector populations (that are competent to transmit pathogens) with those that are not competent to transmit pathogens. There are several theoretical strategies to accomplish this. One is to exploit the maternally-inherited symbiotic bacteria Wolbachia pipientis. Wolbachia is a widespread reproductive parasite that spreads in a selfish manner at the extent of its host's fitness. Jason Rasgon discusses, in detail, the basic biology of this bacterial symbiont and various ways to use it for control of vector-borne diseases.

Disclosures

The authors have nothing to disclose.

Population Replacement Strategies for Controlling Vector Populations and the Use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic Drive
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Rasgon, J. Population Replacement Strategies for Controlling Vector Populations and the Use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic Drive. J. Vis. Exp. (5), e225, doi:10.3791/225 (2007).More

Rasgon, J. Population Replacement Strategies for Controlling Vector Populations and the Use of Wolbachia pipientis for Genetic Drive. J. Vis. Exp. (5), e225, doi:10.3791/225 (2007).

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