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Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.
 JoVE In-Press

Effects of Exposure of Formaldehyde to a Rat Model of Atopic Dermatitis Induced by Neonatal Capsaicin Treatment

1Neuroscience Research Institute & Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Korea University, 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Biotechnology, College of Medical Engineering, Konyang University, 3Division of Biological Science and Technology, Science and Technology College, Yonsei University Wonju Campus

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JoVE 55987

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Non-invasive In Vivo Fluorescence Optical Imaging of Inflammatory MMP Activity Using an Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agent

1Werner Siemens Imaging Center, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, 3Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen


JoVE 55180

 JoVE Medicine

Validation of Nanobody and Antibody Based In Vivo Tumor Xenograft NIRF-imaging Experiments in Mice Using Ex Vivo Flow Cytometry and Microscopy

1Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center, Hamburg, 2Institute of Immunology, University Medical Center, Hamburg, 3University Cancer Center Hamburg, University Medical Center, Hamburg, 4Department of Oncology and Hematology, University Medical Center, Hamburg


JoVE 52462

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 JoVE In-Press

A Component-Resolved Diagnostic Approach for a Study on Grass Pollen Allergens in Chinese Southerners with Allergic Rhinitis And/or Asthma

1State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, 2National Clinical Research Center of Respiratory Disease, 3Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Diseases, 4Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University

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JoVE 55723

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Investigating Mast Cell Secretory Granules; from Biosynthesis to Exocytosis

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 2Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University


JoVE 52505

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in the Dorsal Skin of Hamsters: a Useful Model for the Screening of Antileishmanial Drugs

1Program for the Study and Control of Tropical Diseases -PECET-School of Medicine, University of Antioquia, 2School of Agrarian Sciences, University of Antioquia


JoVE 3533

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Determining Immune System Suppression versus CNS Protection for Pharmacological Interventions in Autoimmune Demyelination

1Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 2Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 3Department of Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Center for Glial Biology and Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham


JoVE 54348

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 Science Education:

Preparing and Administering Intramuscular Injections

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intramuscular (IM) injections deposit medications deep into the muscle tissue. Since muscle fibers are well perfused, this route of administration provides quick uptake of the medication and allows for the administration of relatively large volumes. Skeletal muscles have fewer pain-sensing nerves than subcutaneous tissue, which allows for the less painful administration of irritating drugs (e.g., chlorpromazine, an anti-psychotic). IM injections are recommended for patients unable to take oral medications and for uncooperative patients. Some examples of medications that are commonly delivered by IM injections include antibiotics, hormones, and vaccinations. As in any other route of administration, the nurse must consider if the medication is appropriate, given the patient's medical conditions, allergies, and current clinical status. In addition, specifically for IM injections, it is important to assess the patient's muscle mass to determine the appropriate needle size. Also, if the patient has already received this injection, it is necessary to verify the injection site that was previously used and to ensure that the previous dose did not result in any adverse

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Basophil Activation Test for Investigation of IgE-Mediated Mechanisms in Drug Hypersensitivity

1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Salzburg, 2Department of Neurology, Paracelsus Medical University, 3Department of Dermatology, Paracelsus Medical University, 4Bühlmann Laboratories, 5Christian Doppler Laboratory for Allergy Diagnosis and Therapy, University of Salzburg


JoVE 3263

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 Science Education: Essentials of Lab Animal Research

Rodent Identification II

JoVE Science Education

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

Animal records must be accurately maintained to ensure that data collection is correct. Records range from maintaining information on cage cards to having a detailed database with all of the relevant information on each animal. The primary component of recordkeeping is the individual identification of research animals. There are a variety of methods suitable for identifying mice and rats. This video describes the procedural techniques for tattooing, microchip placement, and temporary identification methods, and also explores the benefits of each.

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 Science Education: Essentials of Lab Animal Research

Rodent Identification I

JoVE Science Education

Source: Kay Stewart, RVT, RLATG, CMAR; Valerie A. Schroeder, RVT, RLATG. University of Notre Dame, IN

A fundamental requirement of biomedical research is the proper identification of research animals. It is essential that the right animal is utilized for procedures and data collection. Laboratory mice and rats can be identified with the following permanent methods: ear tags, ear punch codes, microchip implantation, tail tattoos for adult mice, and toe tattoos for neonates. Temporary methods of dyes and marking pens can also be used for acute studies. This video covers the technical aspects of ear tagging and punching for mice and rats, as well as the benefits of each with respect to the type of research being conducted on the animals. Knowledge of the basic manual restraint techniques for each animal (covered in a separate video) is required for these identification methods to be properly accomplished.

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 Science Education:

Preparing and Administering IV Push Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Intravenous (IV) push is the rapid administration of a small volume of medication into a patient's vein via a previously inserted IV catheter. Preparations for IV push administration are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a syringe. This method is used when a rapid response to a medication is required, or when the medication cannot be administered via the oral route. For instance, medications commonly administered via IV push are the ones used to treat moderate or severe pain. Before administrating IV push, it is important to confirm the correct placement of the IV catheter, because the push medication can cause irritation and damage to the lining of the blood vessel and to surrounding tissues. Since IV push medications act quickly, the patients need to be closely monitored after the drug has been administered, and any error can be especially dangerous. It is imperative that the nurse adheres to the five "rights" and three checks of safe medication administration and is knowledgeable about the medication purpose and adverse effects. The nurse should determine the appropriate medication dose, based upon the medication concentration in the container. If

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 Science Education:

Preparing and Administering Subcutaneous Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Subcutaneous medication administration is a parenteral approach to administer small amounts of medication (less than 2 mL) into the layer of tissue just below the skin. Common medications administered via the subcutaneous route include anticoagulant medications, such as heparin or enoxaparin; epinephrine administered for allergic reactions; insulin; and some immunizations. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. Subcutaneous needles have a shorter length and smaller diameter than syringes used for intramuscular injections, are typically less than 5/8th of an inch, and are 26 gauge or smaller. Medication absorption and onset is slower than for intravenous routes, with some absorption rates lasting 24 h or longer. This approach is selected for many medications that may be denatured or deactivated if given via the oral route, given the acidity of the gastrointestinal tract. Subcutaneous injection preparations are commonly provided in vials or ampules for withdrawal into a subcutaneous syringe. The nurse should determine the appropriate medication dose according to

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 JoVE Biology

Quantitation of γH2AX Foci in Tissue Samples

1Epigenomic Medicine, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 2Epigenetics in Human Health and Disease, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Medical Research and Education Precinct, 3Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, 4Department of Allergy and Immunology, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, 5Department of Pediatrics, The University of Melbourne


JoVE 2063

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 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Human Lung Dendritic Cells: Spatial Distribution and Phenotypic Identification in Endobronchial Biopsies Using Immunohistochemistry and Flow Cytometry

1Immunology and Allergy Unit, Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, 2Division of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 3Divison of Infectious Diseases, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Umeå University


JoVE 55222

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 Science Education:

Preparing and Administering Inhaled Medications

JoVE Science Education

Source: Madeline Lassche, MSNEd, RN and Katie Baraki, MSN, RN, College of Nursing, University of Utah, UT

Inhaled medications are prescribed for conditions affecting the bronchi, which branch off of the trachea, and bronchioles, which are progressively smaller conducting airways spread throughout the lung tissue. These conditions can be classified as acute (i.e., temporary, with quick onset) or chronic (i.e., persistent and/or recurrent symptoms lasting months to years). Common acute conditions requiring inhaled medications include acute bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis, pulmonary edema, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Chronic conditions requiring inhaled medications encompass those classified as COPD (i.e., asthma, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema), as well as other chronic conditions, including cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and pneumoconiosis. These conditions often require medications to open airways, decrease airway inflammation, and promote airflow. The delivery of medications directly into the airways allows for a faster response when compared to systemically administered medications and decreases the impact of systemic side effects. Inhaled medications come in different forms and delivery devices. Common inhaled medications include short- and

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