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Lymphatic System: A system of organs and tissues that process and transport immune cells and Lymph.

Isolation of Human Lymphatic Endothelial Cells by Multi-parameter Fluorescence-activated Cell Sorting

1Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children’s Hospital, 2Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, 3Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton

JoVE 52691


 Medicine

Lymph Node Exam

JoVE 10061

Source: Richard Glickman-Simon, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, MA

The lymphatic system has two main functions: to return extracellular fluid back to the venous circulation and to expose antigenic substances to the immune system. As the collected fluid passes through lymphatic channels on its way back to the systemic circulation, it encounters multiple nodes consisting of highly concentrated clusters of lymphocytes. Most lymph channels and nodes reside deep within the body and, therefore, are not accessible to physical exam (Figure 1). Only nodes near the surface can be inspected or palpated. Lymph nodes are normally invisible, and smaller nodes are also non-palpable. However, larger nodes (>1 cm) in the neck, axillae, and inguinal areas are often detectable as soft, smooth, movable, non-tender, bean-shaped masses imbedded in subcutaneous tissue. Lymphadenopathy usually indicates an infection or, less commonly, a cancer in the area of lymph drainage. Nodes may become enlarged, fixed, firm, and/or tender depending on the pathology present. For example, a soft, tender lymph node palpable near the angle of the mandible may indicate an infected tonsil, whereas a firm, enlarged, non-tender lymph


 Physical Examinations II

Cannula Implantation into the Cisterna Magna of Rodents

1Center for Translational Neuromedicine, Division of Glial Therapeutics, University of Copenhagen, 2Center for Translational Neuromedicine, Division of Glial Therapeutics, University of Rochester Medical Center, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Yale School of Medicine, 4Department of Experimental Medical Science, Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University

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JoVE 57378


 JoVE In-Press

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