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Membrane Lipids: Lipids, predominantly phospholipids, cholesterol and small amounts of glycolipids found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. These lipids may be arranged in bilayers in the membranes with integral proteins between the layers and peripheral proteins attached to the outside. Membrane lipids are required for active transport, several enzymatic activities and membrane formation.

Methods to Study Lipid Alterations in Neutrophils and the Subsequent Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

1Department of Physiological Chemistry, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 2Fish Disease Research Unit, University of Veterinary Medicine, 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Biomedical Center, Lund University, 4Research Center for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses (RIZ), University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover

JoVE 54667

 Immunology and Infection

A Lipid Extraction and Analysis Method for Characterizing Soil Microbes in Experiments with Many Samples

1Department of Agronomy and Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 3Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, 4Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University

JoVE 55310


The C. elegans Intestine As a Model for Intercellular Lumen Morphogenesis and In Vivo Polarized Membrane Biogenesis at the Single-cell Level: Labeling by Antibody Staining, RNAi Loss-of-function Analysis and Imaging

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

JoVE 56100

 Developmental Biology

Capturing the Interaction Kinetics of an Ion Channel Protein with Small Molecules by the Bio-layer Interferometry Assay

1Department of General Surgery, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine (Ministry of Education), Institute of Systems Biomedicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Hongqiao International Institute of Medicine, Tongren Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine

JoVE 56846


An Overview of bGDGT Biomarker Analysis for Paleoclimatology

JoVE 10256

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

Throughout this series of videos, natural samples were extracted and purified in search of organic compounds, called biomarkers, that can relate information on climates and environments of the past. One of the samples analyzed was sediment. Sediments accumulate over geologic time in basins, depressions in the Earth into which sediment flows through the action of fluid (water or air), movement, and gravity. Two main types of basins exist, marine (oceans and seas) and lacustrine (lakes). As one might guess, very different types of life live in these settings, driven in large part by the difference in salinity between them. Over the last few decades, organic geochemists discovered a toolbox of biomarker proxies, or compounds that can be used to describe climate or environment, some of which work in marine environments and some of which work in lacustrine. We turn our attention here to the lacustrine realm and branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (Figure 1). In this section we focus on analysis of terrestrial paleotemperature using branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetrathers (Figure 1; brGDGTs) and the MBT/CBT proxy. This proxy was initially described by Weijers et

 Earth Science

Extraction of Biomarkers from Sediments - Accelerated Solvent Extraction

JoVE 10097

Source: Laboratory of Jeff Salacup - University of Massachusetts Amherst

The distribution of a group of organic biomarkers called glycerol-dialkyl glycerol-tetraethers (GDGTs), produced by a suite of archaea and bacteria, were found in modern sediments to change in a predictable manner in response to air or water temperature1,2. Therefore, the distribution of these biomarkers in a sequence of sediments of known age can be used to reconstruct the evolution of air and/or water temperature on decadal to millennial timescales (Figure 1). The production of long high-resolution records of past climates, called paleoclimatology, depends on the rapid analysis of hundreds, possibly thousands of samples. Older extraction techniques, such as sonication or Soxhlet, are too slow. However, the newer Accelerated Solvent Extraction technique was designed with efficiency in mind. Figure 1. An example of a paleoclimate record showing changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the eastern Mediterranean Sea during the past ~27,000 years3. This record comprises ~115 samples and is based on the isoprenoidal GDGT-based TEX86 SS

 Earth Science

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