Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal

Filter by science education

 
 
Acetic Acids: Acetic acid and its derivatives which may be formed by substitution reactions. Mono- and di-substituted, as well as halogenated compounds have been synthesized.

Techniques for the Evolution of Robust Pentose-fermenting Yeast for Bioconversion of Lignocellulose to Ethanol

1Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, 2Mycotoxin Prevention and Applied Microbiology Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, 3Chemical Engineering and Material Science, Great Lakes Bioenergy Center, Michigan State University

JoVE 54227


 Bioengineering

Mammalian Cell Encapsulation in Alginate Beads Using a Simple Stirred Vessel

1Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, 2Michael Smith Laboratories & Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, 3Michael Smith Laboratories & Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of British Columbia

JoVE 55280


 Bioengineering

Introduction to Titration

JoVE 5699

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Yee Nee Tan — Agency for Science, Technology, and Research

Titration is a common technique used to quantitatively determine the unknown concentration of an identified analyte.1-4 It is also called volumetric analysis, as the measurement of volumes is critical in titration. There are many types of titrations based on the types of reactions they exploit. The most common types are acid-base titrations and redox titrations.5-11 In a typical titration process, a standard solution of titrant in a burette is gradually applied to react with an analyte with an unknown concentration in an Erlenmeyer flask. For acid-base titration, a pH indicator is usually added in the analyte solution to indicate the endpoint of titration.12 Instead of adding pH indicators, pH can also be monitored using a pH meter during a titration process and the endpoint is determined graphically from a pH titration curve. The volume of titrant recorded at the endpoint can be used to calculate the concentration of the analyte based on the reaction stoichiometry. For the acid-base titration presented in this video, the titrant is a standardized sodium hydroxide solution and the analyte is domestic vinegar. Vinegar is an acidic liquid that


 General Chemistry

Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

1Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 3Synthetic Biology Center, Department of Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota

JoVE 50762


 Biology

Extraction and Analysis of Microbial Phospholipid Fatty Acids in Soils

1Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, 2Department of Science, Augustana Faculty, University of Alberta, 3Laboratoire Génie Civil et géo-Environnement, Université de Lille, 4Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Mount Royal University, 5Forest Ecology & Production, Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Natural Resources Canada

JoVE 54360


 Environment

Lewis Acid-Base Interaction in Ph3P-BH3

JoVE 10316

Source: Tamara M. Powers, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University 

One of the goals of chemistry is to use models that account for trends and provide insights into the properties of reactants that contribute to reactivity. Substances have been classified as acids and bases since the time of the ancient Greeks, but the definition of acids and bases has been modified and expanded over the years.1 The ancient Greeks would characterize substances by taste, and defined acids as those that were sour-tasting, such as lemon juice and vinegar. The term "acid" is derived from the Latin term for "sour-tasting." Bases were characterized by their ability to counteract or neutralize acids. The first bases characterized were those of ashes from a fire, which were mixed with fats to make soap. In fact, the term "alkaline" is derived from the Arabic word for "roasting." Indeed, it has been known since ancient times that acids and bases can be combined to give a salt and water. The first widely-used description of an acid is that of the Swedish chemist, Svante Arrhenius, who in 1894 defined acids as substances which dissociate in water to give hydronium ions, and bases as substances which dissociate in water to give


 Inorganic Chemistry

Genetic Engineering of an Unconventional Yeast for Renewable Biofuel and Biochemical Production

1Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2NUS Synthetic Biology for Clinical and Technological Innovation (SynCTI), Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, 3Food Science and Chemical Engineering, Singapore Institute of Technology

JoVE 54371


 Genetics

Production of Chemicals by Klebsiella pneumoniae Using Bamboo Hydrolysate as Feedstock

1Lab of Biorefinery, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3Biorefinery Research Center, Jeonbuk Branch Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology (KRIBB), 4School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University

JoVE 55828


 Bioengineering

Cleaning Glassware

JoVE 10342

Source: Vy M. Dong and Daniel Kim, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA

Organic synthesis is about transforming a readily available reagent into a more valuable product. Having clean glassware is crucial for the efficiency of this process. Dirty glassware can potentially affect the reaction and make isolation of the final product more challenging. Thus, a synthetic chemist must keep the glassware spotless. The methods described here will detail different glass cleaning techniques that are regularly used to remove organics, metals, grease, and salts.


 Organic Chemistry II

High-Throughput, Multi-Image Cryohistology of Mineralized Tissues

1Department of Reconstructive Sciences, University of Connecticut Health Center, 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Connecticut Health Center, 4Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester

JoVE 54468


 Biology

Techniques for Processing Eyes Implanted With a Retinal Prosthesis for Localized Histopathological Analysis

1Bionics Institute, 2Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, 4Medical Bionics Department, University of Melbourne

JoVE 50411


 Medicine

Safe Handling of Mineral Acids

JoVE 10370

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A mineral acid (or inorganic acid) is defined as a water-soluble acid derived from inorganic minerals by chemical reaction as opposed to organic acids (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid). Examples of mineral acids include: • Boric acid (CAS No.10043-35-3) • Chromic acid (CAS No.1333-82-0) • Hydrochloric acid (CAS No.7647-01-0) • Hydrofluoric acid (CAS No. 7664-39-3) • Nitric acid (CAS No. 7697-37-2) • Perchloric acid (CAS No. 7601-90-3) • Phosphoric acid (CAS No.7664-38-2) • Sulfuric acid (CAS No.7664-93-9) Mineral acids are commonly found in research laboratories and their corrosive nature makes them a significant safety risk. Since they are important reagents in the research laboratory and often do not have substitutes, it is important that they are handled properly and with care. Some acids are even shock sensitive and under certain conditions may cause explosions (i.e., salts of perchloric acid).


 Lab Safety

12345678936
More Results...