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Biological Phenomena: Biological processes, properties, and characteristics of the whole organism in human, animal, microorganisms, and plants, and of the biosphere.

Nanosensors to Detect Protease Activity In Vivo for Noninvasive Diagnostics

1Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech College of Engineering and Emory School of Medicine, 2Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience, 3Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology, Georgia Tech, 4Integrated Cancer Research Center, Georgia Tech, 5The Georgia Immunoengineering Consortium, Emory University and Georgia Tech

JoVE 57937


 Bioengineering

Long-term Live Imaging Device for Improved Experimental Manipulation of Zebrafish Larvae

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2Morgridge Institute for Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3Laboratory for Optical and Computational Instrumentation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 4Cellular and Molecular Pathology Graduate Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison

JoVE 56340


 Bioengineering

Real-time In Vivo Recording of Arabidopsis Calcium Signals During Insect Feeding Using a Fluorescent Biosensor

1Department of Metabolic Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park, 2Department of Botany, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saitama University, 4Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 5Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre, Norwich Research Park

JoVE 56142


 Biology

PTR-ToF-MS Coupled with an Automated Sampling System and Tailored Data Analysis for Food Studies: Bioprocess Monitoring, Screening and Nose-space Analysis

1Department of Food Quality and Nutrition, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM), 2Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bolzano, 3Department of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Foggia, 4Institute of Analytical Chemistry & Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens Universität Innsbruck, 5Institut für Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Leopold-Franzens Universität Innsbruck

JoVE 54075


 Chemistry

Use of an Optical Trap for Study of Host-Pathogen Interactions for Dynamic Live Cell Imaging

1Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, 3Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 3123


 Immunology and Infection

RNAi in C. elegans

JoVE 5105

RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used technique in which double stranded RNA is exogenously introduced into an organism, causing knockdown of a target gene. In the nematode, C. elegans, RNAi is particularly easy and effective because it can be delivered simply by feeding the worms bacteria that express double stranded RNA (dsRNA) that is complementary to a gene of interest. First, this video will introduce the concept of RNA interference and explain how it causes targeted gene knockdown. Then, we will demonstrate a protocol for using RNAi in C. elegans, which includes preparation of the bacteria and RNAi worm plates, culturing of the worms, and how to assess the effects of RNAi on the worms. RNAi is frequently used to perform reverse genetic screens in order to reveal which genes are important to carry out specific biological processes. Furthermore, automated reverse genetic screens allow for the efficient knockdown and analysis of a large collection of genes. Lastly, RNAi is often used to study the development of C. elegans. Since its discovery, scientists have used RNAi to make tremendous progress on the understanding of many biological phenomena.


 Biology I

Concurrent Quantification of Cellular and Extracellular Components of Biofilms

1Department of Dental Materials, College of Dentistry, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 3Department of Biological Sciences, School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, The Copperbelt University

JoVE 50639


 Immunology and Infection

A Protocol for Bioinspired Design: A Ground Sampler Based on Sea Urchin Jaws

1Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 3Integrative Oceanography Division, Center for Marine Biodiversity and Conservation, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 4Marine Biology Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

JoVE 53554


 Bioengineering

Combined In vivo Optical and µCT Imaging to Monitor Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Anatomy in an Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Mice

1Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 2PerkinElmer, 3Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

JoVE 51612


 Medicine

Protocols for Implementing an Escherichia coli Based TX-TL Cell-Free Expression System for Synthetic Biology

1Department of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 2Department of Bioengineering, California Institute of Technology, 3Synthetic Biology Center, Department of Bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 4School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota

JoVE 50762


 Biology

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