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DNA Probes: Species- or subspecies-specific DNA (including Complementary dna; conserved genes, whole chromosomes, or whole genomes) used in hybridization studies in order to identify microorganisms, to measure Dna-dna homologies, to group subspecies, etc. The DNA probe hybridizes with a specific mRNA, if present. Conventional techniques used for testing for the hybridization product include dot blot assays, Southern blot assays, and DNA:RNA hybrid-specific antibody tests. Conventional labels for the DNA probe include the radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. The use of DNA probes provides a specific, sensitive, rapid, and inexpensive replacement for cell culture techniques for diagnosing infections.

Detection of the Genome and Transcripts of a Persistent DNA Virus in Neuronal Tissues by Fluorescent In situ Hybridization Combined with Immunostaining

1Virus and Centromere Team, Centre de Génétique et Physiologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, CNRS UMR 5534, 2Université de Lyon 1, 3Laboratoire d'excellence, LabEX DEVweCAN, 4Institut de Virologie Moléculaire et Structurale, CNRS UPR 3296, 5Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de Lyon, INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR 5286

JoVE 51091


 Neuroscience

Identification of Homologous Recombination Events in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Using Southern Blotting and Polymerase Chain Reaction

1Lab of Animal Models and Functional Genomics (LAMFG), The Key Laboratory of Animal Vaccine & Protein Engineering, College of Veterinary Medicine, Hunan Agricultural University (HUNAU), 2Department of Pathology, Georgetown University Medical School, 3College of Food Science and Technology, Hunan Agricultural University (HUNAU), 4Lab of Molecular Cardiology (LMC), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)/National Institutes of Health (NIH), 5Transgenic Core, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)/National Institutes of Health (NIH)

JoVE 58467


 Genetics

Biomolecular Detection employing the Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (IRIS)

1Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 3Center for Advanced Genomics Technology, Boston University, 4Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Boston University School of Medicine, 5Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 6CNR (National Research Council), Istituto di Chimica del Riconoscimento Molecolare

JoVE 2694


 Bioengineering

Bacterial Detection & Identification Using Electrochemical Sensors

1Research Service, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, 2Department of Urology, The David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 3GeneFluidics, 4Division of Infectious Diseases, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, 5Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles

JoVE 4282


 Bioengineering

Fluorescence in situ Hybridizations (FISH) for the Localization of Viruses and Endosymbiotic Bacteria in Plant and Insect Tissues

1Department of Entomology, Volcani Center, 2Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture, Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 3Department of Applied Sciences, Institute for Adriatic Crops and Karst Reclamation, 4The Institute of Plant Sciences, Volcani Center

JoVE 51030


 Immunology and Infection

Cytogenetics

JoVE 5545

Cytogenetics is the field of study devoted to chromosomes, and involves the direct observation of a cell’s chromosomal number and structure, together known as its karyotype. Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with disease. Each chromosome in a karyotype can be stained with a variety of dyes to give unique banding patterns. More recent techniques, including comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), allow for detecting specific chromosomal features or abnormalities.This video will begin by examining the principles of these classical and modern cytogenetics techniques. This is followed by an examination of a general protocol for performing FISH. Finally, several examples of how karyotyping can be applied to various medical applications are presented.


 Genetics

Detection of Inter-chromosomal Stable Aberrations by Multiple Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (mFISH) and Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) in Irradiated Mice

1Division of Radiation Health, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 2Department of Environmental Health, Fay W. Boozman School of Public Health, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 3Surgical Service, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System

JoVE 55162


 Genetics

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