Refine your search:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by section
 
 
Hip Joint:
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Bioengineering

In situ Compressive Loading and Correlative Noninvasive Imaging of the Bone-periodontal Ligament-tooth Fibrous Joint

1Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 2Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, 3Xradia Inc.


JoVE 51147

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Bioengineering

Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, 3Interdisciplinary Program for Bioengineering, Seoul National University Graduate School, 4Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 5Seoul National University College of Medicine, 6Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University


JoVE 54521

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Elbow Exam

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The elbow is a hinged joint that involves the articulation of 3 bones: the humerus, radius, and ulna. It is a much more stable joint than the shoulder, and because of that, the elbow has less range of motion. The elbow and its structures are prone to significant injuries, particularly with repetitive motion. Lateral and medial epicondylitis (also called tennis elbow and golfer's elbow) are two common diagnoses and often occur as a result of occupational activities. When examining the elbow, it is important to remove enough clothing so that the entire shoulder and elbow can be inspected. It is important to compare the injured elbow to the uninvolved side. A systematic evaluation of the elbow includes inspection, palpation, range of motion (ROM) testing, and special tests, including maneuvers to evaluate ligamentous stability and stretch tests to accentuate pain caused by epicondylitis.

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Knee Exam

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The knee is a hinged joint that connects the femur with the tibia. It is the largest joint in the body, and due to its location in the middle of the lower leg, it is subjected to a variety of traumatic and degenerative forces. Examination of the knee can be quite complex, owing to the fact it is an inherently unstable joint held together by various ligaments and supported by menisci, which act as shock absorbers and increase the contact area of the joint. In addition, the patella lies in front of the knee, acting as a fulcrum to allow the forceful extension of the knee needed for running and kicking. As the largest sesamoid bone in the body, the knee is a common source of pain related to trauma or overuse. When examining the knee, it is important to remove enough clothing so that the entire thigh, knee, and lower leg are exposed. The exam begins with inspection and palpation of key anatomic landmarks, followed by an assessment of the patient's range of motion (ROM). The knee exam continues with tests for ligament or meniscus injury and special testing for patellofemoral dysfunction and dislocation of the patella. The opposite knee should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured knee, provided it has not been previousl

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Medicine

Combined In vivo Optical and µCT Imaging to Monitor Infection, Inflammation, and Bone Anatomy in an Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Mice

1Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, Orthopaedic Hospital Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 2PerkinElmer, 3Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine


JoVE 51612

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Shoulder Exam I

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

Examination of the shoulder can be complex, because it actually consists of four separate joints: are the glenohumeral (GH) joint, the acromioclavicular (AC) joint, the sternoclavicular joint, and the scapulothoracic joint. The GH joint is primarily responsible for shoulder motion and is the most mobile joint in the body. It has been likened to a golf ball sitting on a tee and is prone to instability. It is held in place by the four rotator cuff muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis), along with the GH ligaments. The shoulder exam begins with the inspection and palpation of the key anatomic landmarks, followed by an assessment of the patient's range of motion. The opposite shoulder should be used as the standard to evaluate the injured shoulder, provided it has not been previously injured.

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Wrist and Hand Examination

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The wrist is a complex joint made up of 8 carpal bones and their numerous articulations and ligaments. Overlying the wrist are the tendons and muscles of the hand and fingers. The hand is made up of 5 metacarpal bones, and the tendons that run to the hand overlie these bones. Finally, the fingers consist of 14 phalanges with their articulations held together by collateral ligaments and volar plates. Common mechanisms of both acute and chronic wrist injury include impact, weight bearing (which can occur in gymnastics), twisting, and throwing. Osteoarthritis of the hand commonly affects distal interphalangeal (DIP) and proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints, while rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is seen in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and PIP joints. It is important to compare the injured wrist or hand to the uninvolved side. Key aspects of the wrist and hand exam include inspection, palpation for tenderness or deformity, testing the range of motion (ROM) and strength, neurovascular assessment, ligaments and tendon testing, and the special tests.

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Medicine

Treatment of Osteochondral Defects in the Rabbit's Knee Joint by Implantation of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Fibrin Clots

1Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 2Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 3Institute of Experimental Oncology and Therapy Research, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 4Department of Radiology, Uniklinik Köln


JoVE 4423

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Medicine

Exergaming in Older People Living with HIV Improves Balance, Mobility and Ameliorates Some Aspects of Frailty

1Department of Surgery, Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), College of Medicine, University of Arizona, 2Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, 3Interdisciplinary Consortium on Advanced Motion Performance (iCAMP), Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy, Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine


JoVE 54275

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Bioengineering

Surgical Retrieval, Isolation and In vitro Expansion of Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament-derived Cells for Tissue Engineering Applications

1Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology & Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 2Division of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Department of Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 3Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Program, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 4University of Illinois at Springfield


JoVE 51597

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care

Intra-articular Shoulder Injection for Reduction Following Shoulder Dislocation

JoVE Science Education

Source: Rachel Liu, BAO, MBBCh, Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA

The anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common joint dislocations seen in emergency settings. In anterior shoulder dislocation, the humeral head is displaced out of the glenohumeral joint in front of the scapular glenoid, resulting in a loss of the articulation between the arm and the rest of the shoulder. This can be caused by a fall onto an abducted, extended, and externally rotated arm, such as in a bicycle or running accident. Sometimes anterior shoulder dislocation can be due to a minor trauma or even result from rolling over in bed with an externally rotated and stretched overhead arm. Anterior shoulder dislocation is a painful injury. Patients cannot actively abduct, adduct or internally rotate the shoulder. Reduction of the shoulder is the best form of analgesia and, of course, is necessary to restore arm function. While it is current practice for patients to undergo procedural sedation during the shoulder reduction procedure, the sedatives have serious side effects (cardiac and respiratory depression), and require long stays in the emergency department (ED), dedicated nursing staff, multiple radiographs, and consulting services. Intra-art

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Developmental Biology

Generation of Induced-pluripotent Stem Cells Using Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes Isolated from Joints of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

1CiSTEM Laboratory, Convergent Research Consortium for Immunologic Disease, Division of Rheumatology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Republic of Korea, 2Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Institute of Medical Science, Republic of Korea, 3College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Republic of Korea


JoVE 54072

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Biology

High-Throughput, Multi-Image Cryohistology of Mineralized Tissues

1Department of Reconstructive Sciences, University of Connecticut Health Center, 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Connecticut Health Center, 4Department of Orthopaedics, University of Rochester


JoVE 54468

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 Science Education: Essentials of Physical Examinations III

Hip Exam

JoVE Science Education

Source: Robert E. Sallis, MD. Kaiser Permanente, Fontana, California, USA

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint that consists of the femoral head articulating with the acetabulum. When combined with the hip ligaments, the hip makes for a very strong and stable joint. But, despite this stability, the hip has considerable motion and is prone to degeneration with wear and tear over time and after injury. Hip pain can affect patients of all ages and can be associated with various intra- and extra-articular pathologies. Anatomic location of pain in the hip region can often provide initial diagnostic clues. Essential aspects of the hip exam include an inspection for asymmetry, swelling, and gait abnormalities; palpation for areas of tenderness; range of motion and strength testing; a neurological (sensory) exam; and additional special diagnostic maneuvers to narrow down the differential diagnosis.

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Medicine

Computerized Dynamic Posturography for Postural Control Assessment in Patients with Intermittent Claudication

1Discipline of Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, 2Department of Sport, Health and Exercise Science, University of Hull, 3Academic Vascular Department, Hull Royal Infirmary, Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Addenbrookes Hospital


JoVE 51077

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Medicine

Matrix-assisted Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation for Remodeling and Repair of Chondral Defects in a Rabbit Model

1Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 2Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 3Institute of Experimental Oncology and Therapy Research, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universität München, 4Department of Radiology, Uniklinik Köln


JoVE 4422

Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
Results below contain some, but not all of your search terms.
 JoVE Biology

Bioelectric Analyses of an Osseointegrated Intelligent Implant Design System for Amputees

1Department of Veteran Affairs, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, 3Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute , University of Utah, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Utah, 5Department of Orthopaedics, University of Utah


JoVE 1237

123459
More Results...
Waiting
simple hit counter