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Intermediate Filament Proteins: Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.

Three-Dimensional Tissue Engineered Aligned Astrocyte Networks to Recapitulate Developmental Mechanisms and Facilitate Nervous System Regeneration

1Center for Brain Injury & Repair, Department of Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 2Center for Neurotrauma, Neurodegeneration & Restoration, Michael J. Crescenz Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, 4Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Pennsylvania, 5Neuroscience Graduate Group, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

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JoVE 55848


 JoVE In-Press

The C. elegans Intestine As a Model for Intercellular Lumen Morphogenesis and In Vivo Polarized Membrane Biogenesis at the Single-cell Level

1Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center, Developmental Biology and Genetics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, 3Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56100


 JoVE In-Press

From Voxels to Knowledge: A Practical Guide to the Segmentation of Complex Electron Microscopy 3D-Data

1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2Joint Bioenergy Institute, Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 3National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

JoVE 51673


 Bioengineering

Analysis of Retinoic Acid-induced Neural Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells in Two and Three-dimensional Embryoid Bodies

1Department of Medicine, Cardeza Vascular Research Center, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, 2Department of Molecular Cardiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 3Department of Cancer Biology, Cardeza Vascular Research Center, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University

JoVE 55621


 Developmental Biology

Purification of Mouse Brain Vessels

1Collège de France, Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Biology (CIRB), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique CNRS, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7241, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, 2Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Biologie, 3MEMOLIFE Laboratory of Excellence and Paris Science, Lettre Research University, 4Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Pharmacie, Université Paris Diderot

JoVE 53208


 Neuroscience

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3D Printing of Biomolecular Models for Research and Pedagogy

1Department of Physics, Brandeis University, 2Bioinformatics and Computational Biosciences Branch (BCBB), NIH/NIAID/OD/OSMO/OCICB, 3Library/LTS/MakerLab, Brandeis University, 4Interfaculty Institute of Biochemistry (IFIB), University of Tübingen, 5Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine

JoVE 55427


 Engineering

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Ohm's Law

JoVE 10116

Source: Andrew Duffy, PhD, Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA

This experiment investigates Ohm's law, which relates current, voltage, and resistance.

One goal of the experiment is to become familiar with circuit diagrams and the terminology involved in basic circuits, such as resistor, resistance, current, voltage, and power supply. By the end of the experiment, familiarity is gained with how to wire up a circuit and how to measure both the current passing through a circuit component and the potential difference, or voltage, across it. In a circuit, a battery or power supply provides a voltage measured in volts (V) that makes the charge flow. Other elements in the circuit, such as light bulbs or resistors (which are often just long narrow wires wound into coils) limit the rate at which the charge flows. The rate of flow of the charge is known as current measured in amperes (A), or amps for short, and the degree to which resistors and light bulb filaments limit the flow is known as their resistance measured in ohms (Ω). This experiment involves an exploration of Ohm's law, which relates voltage, current, and resistance. This experiment also explores the difference between a basic circuit component called a resistor, a


 Essentials of Physics II

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