Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Hypertension, Portal: Abnormal increase of resistance to blood flow within the hepatic Portal system, frequently seen in Liver cirrhosis and conditions with obstruction of the Portal vein.

Invasive Hemodynamic Characterization of the Portal-hypertensive Syndrome in Cirrhotic Rats

1Div. of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dept. of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 2Vienna Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, 3Center of Biomedical Research, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria

JoVE 57261


 Medicine

Re-Arterialized Rat Partial Liver Transplantation with an in vivo Vessel-Oriented 70% Hepatectomy

1Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, 2Reproductive Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, 3Department of Transplantation, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, 4Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

JoVE 56392


 Medicine

Abdominal Exam IV: Acute Abdominal Pain Assessment

JoVE 10120

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

Abdominal pain is a frequent presenting concern in both the emergency department and the office setting. Acute abdominal pain is defined as pain lasting less than seven days, while an acute abdomen refers to the abrupt onset of severe abdominal pain with features suggesting a surgically intervenable process. The differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain is broad; thus, clinicians must have a systematic method of examination guided by a careful history, remembering that pathology outside of the abdomen can also cause abdominal pain, including pulmonary, cardiac, rectal, and genital disorders. Terminology for describing the location of abdominal tenderness includes the right and left upper and lower quadrants, and the epigastric, umbilical, and hypogastric regions (Figures 1, 2). Thorough examination requires an organized approach involving inspection, auscultation, percussion, and palpation, with each maneuver performed purposefully and with a clear mental representation of the anatomy. Rather than palpating randomly across the abdomen, begin palpating remotely from the site of tenderness, moving systematically toward the tender region, and thi


 Physical Examinations II

Peripheral Vascular Exam

JoVE 10122

Source: Joseph Donroe, MD, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) increases with age and is a significant cause of morbidity in older patients, and peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. Diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and tobacco use are important disease risk factors. When patients become symptomatic, they frequently complain of limb claudication, defined as a cramp-like muscle pain that worsens with activity and improves with rest. Patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) often present with lower extremity swelling, pain, skin changes, and ulceration. While the benefits of screening asymptomatic patients for PVD are unclear, physicians should know the proper exam technique when the diagnosis of PVD is being considered. This video reviews the vascular examination of the upper and lower extremities and abdomen. As always, the examiner should use a systematic method of examination, though in practice, the extent of the exam a physician performs depends on their suspicion of underlying PVD. In a patient who has or is suspected to have risk factors for vascular disease, the vascular exam should be thorough, beginning with inspection, fo


 Physical Examinations I

More Results...