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DNA Fragmentation: Splitting the DNA into shorter pieces by endonucleolytic Dna cleavage at multiple sites. It includes the internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which along with chromatin condensation, are considered to be the hallmarks of Apoptosis.

Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation

1Department of Cancer Genetics and Developmental Biology, BC Cancer Research Centre, 2Interdisciplinary Oncology Program, University of British Columbia - UBC, 3These authors contributed equally., 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of British Columbia - UBC, 5Photography/Video Production, Multi-Media Services, BC Cancer Agency, 6Department of Medical Genetics, Life Sciences Institute,, University of British Columbia - UBC

JoVE 935


 Biology

Promoter Capture Hi-C: High-resolution, Genome-wide Profiling of Promoter Interactions

1Nuclear Dynamics Programme, The Babraham Institute, Babraham Research Campus, 2IJC Building, Campus ICO-Germans Trias i Pujol, Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute, 3Departamento de Genética Molecular, Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 4Bioinformatics Group, The Babraham Institute, Babraham Research Campus, 5Department of Biological Science, Florida State University

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57320


 JoVE In-Press

Bidirectional Retroviral Integration Site PCR Methodology and Quantitative Data Analysis Workflow

1UCLA AIDS Institute, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), 2Department of Microbiology, Immunology, & Molecular Genetics, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), 3Departments of Biomathematics and Mathematics, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), 4Personalized Genomic Medicine Research Center, Division of Strategic Research Groups, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 5Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), 6Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University (OSU)

JoVE 55812


 Genetics

Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) Spermatozoa: Collection, Cryopreservation, and Heterologous In Vitro Fertilization

1Department of Animal Reproduction, Instituto Nacional de Investigación y Tecnología Agraria y Alimentaria (INIA), 2Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, School of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 3Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Murcia, Campus Mare Nostrum, 4Mundomar, Benidorm, 5Veterinary Services, L'Oceanográfic, Ciudad de las Artes y las Ciencias, Junta de Murs i Vals, s/n, 46013

JoVE 55237


 Developmental Biology

Use of a Caspase Multiplexing Assay to Determine Apoptosis in a Hypothalamic Cell Model

1Department of Veterans Affairs, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, 2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Minnesota, 3Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, University of Minnesota, 4Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, University of Minnesota

JoVE 51305


 Neuroscience

An Introduction to Cell Death

JoVE 5649

Necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death are all manners in which cells can die, and these mechanisms can be induced by different stimuli, such as cell injury, low nutrient levels, or signaling proteins. Whereas necrosis is considered to be an “accidental” or unexpected form of cell death, evidence exists that apoptosis and autophagy are both programmed and “planned” by cells.In this introductory video, JoVE highlights key discoveries pertaining to cell death, including recent work done in worms that helped identify genes involved in apoptosis. We then explore questions asked by scientists studying cell death, some of which look at different death pathways and their interactions. Finally, several methods to assess cell death are discussed, and we note how researchers are applying these techniques in their experiments today.


 Cell Biology

The TUNEL Assay

JoVE 5651

One of the hallmarks of apoptosis is the nuclear DNA fragmentation by nucleases. These enzymes are activated by caspases, the family of proteins that execute the cell death program. TUNEL assay is a method that takes advantage of this feature to detect apoptotic cells. In this assay, an enzyme called terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase catalyzes the addition of dUTP nucleotides to the free 3’ ends of fragmented DNA. By using dUTPs that are labeled with chemical tags that can produce fluorescence or color, apoptotic cells can be specifically identified. JoVE’s video on the TUNEL assay begins by discussing how this technique can be used to detect apoptotic cells. We then go through a general protocol for performing TUNEL assays on tissue sections and visualizing the results using fluorescence microscopy. Finally, several applications of the assay to current research will be covered.


 Cell Biology

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