Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Gene Targeting: The integration of exogenous DNA into the genome of an organism at sites where its expression can be suitably controlled. This integration occurs as a result of homologous recombination.

Recombineering and Gene Targeting

JoVE 5553

One of the most widely used tools in modern biology is molecular cloning with restriction enzymes, which create compatible ends between DNA fragments that allow them to be joined together. However, this technique has certain restrictions that limit its applicability for large or complex DNA construct generation. A newer technique that addresses some of these shortcomings is recombineering, which modifies DNA using homologous recombination (HR), the exchange between different DNA molecules based on stretches of similar or identical sequences. Together with gene targeting, which takes advantage of endogenous HR to alter an organism’s genome at a specific loci, HR-based cloning techniques have greatly improved the speed and efficacy of high-throughput genetic engineering.In this video, we introduce the principles of HR, as well as the basic components required to perform a recombineering experiment, including recombination-competent organisms and genomic libraries such as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC). We then walk through a protocol that uses recombineering to generate a gene-targeting vector that can ultimately be transfected into embryonic stem cells to generate a transgenic animal. Finally, several applications that highlight the utility and variety of recombineering techniques wi


 Genetics

Genome Editing

JoVE 5554

A well-established technique for modifying specific sequences in the genome is gene targeting by homologous recombination, but this method can be laborious and only works in certain organisms. Recent advances have led to the development of “genome editing”, which works by inducing double-strand breaks in DNA using engineered nuclease enzymes guided to target genomic sites by either proteins or RNAs that recognize specific sequences. When a cell attempts to repair this damage, mutations can be introduced into the targeted DNA region. In this video, JoVE explains the principles behind genome editing, emphasizing how this technique relates to DNA repair mechanisms. Then, three major genome editing methods—zinc finger nucleases, TALENs, and the CRISPR-Cas9 system—are reviewed, followed by a protocol for using CRISPR to create targeted genetic changes in mammalian cells. Finally, we discuss some current research that applies genome editing to alter the genetic material in model organisms or cultured cells.


 Genetics

Genetic Engineering of Model Organisms

JoVE 5327

Transgenesis, or the use of genetic engineering to alter gene expression, is widely used in the field of developmental biology. Scientists use a number of approaches to alter the function of genes to understand their roles in developmental processes. This includes replacement of a gene with a nonfunctional copy, or adding a visualizable tag to a gene that allows the resultant fusion protein to be tracked throughout development. In this video, the viewers will learn about the principles behind transgenesis, as well as the basic steps for introducing genetic constructs into an animal and targeting genes of interest. This is followed by the discussion of a protocol to create knockout mice. Lastly, some specific applications of transgenic technologies in the field of developmental biology will be reviewed.


 Developmental Biology

An Overview of Genetic Engineering

JoVE 5552

Genetic engineering – the process of purposefully altering an organism’s DNA – has been used to create powerful research tools and model organisms, and has also seen many agricultural applications. However, in order to engineer traits to tackle complex agricultural problems such as stress tolerance, or to realize the promise of gene therapy for treating human diseases, further advances in the field are still needed. Important considerations include the safe and efficient delivery of genetic constructs into cells or organisms, and the establishment of the desired modification in an organism’s genome with the least “off-target” effects. JoVE’s Overview of Genetic Engineering will present a history of the field, highlighting the discoveries that confirmed DNA as the genetic material and led to the development of tools to modify DNA. Key questions that must be answered in order to improve the process of genetic engineering will then be introduced, along with various tools used by genetic engineers. Finally, we will survey several applications demonstrating the types of experimental questions and strategies in the field today.


 Genetics

Murine In Utero Electroporation

JoVE 5208

In utero electroporation is an important technique for studying the molecular mechanisms that guide the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and maturation of cells during neural development. Electroporation enables the rapid and targeted delivery of material into cells by utilizing electrical pulses to create transient pores in cell membranes. Although electroporation has traditionally been used in in vitro studies, scientific advancements have now broadened its utilization to intact organs, such as those found in mouse embryos developing in utero. This video will introduce the key principles behind in utero electroporation in addition to reviewing the basic surgical techniques required to access developing embryos within a pregnant rodent. Details of the injection and electroporation steps are provided along with important considerations for directing gene delivery to specific brain regions. Finally, neurobiological applications of in utero electroporation are presented, such as investigating how specific genes contribute to neural development and how connections form between developing neurons.


 Neuroscience

Rodent Stereotaxic Surgery

JoVE 5205

Stereotaxic (or stereotactic) surgery is a method used to manipulate the brain of living animals. This technique allows researchers to accurately target deep structures within the brain through the use of a stereotaxic atlas, which provides the 3D coordinates of each area with respect to anatomical landmarks on the skull. After the skull is exposed, anesthetized animals are mounted on a specialized instrument known as a stereotaxic frame, which enables the precise placement of experimental tools at the defined coordinates. Stereotaxic surgery is a versatile approach that can be used to generate lesions, manipulate gene expression, or deliver experimental agents to the brain.This video-article provides a general overview of the principles behind stereotaxic surgery, including instructions for using a stereotaxic atlas and the stereotaxic frame, and an introduction to reading the Vernier scale for measurement of probe movements. The subsequent discussion outlines the steps required to perform the surgical procedure. Lastly, a broad range of technical applications are presented, such as the insertion of electrical probes to measure brain activity and genetic manipulation of brain tissue.


 Neuroscience

Biodistribution of Nano-drug Carriers: Applications of SEM

JoVE 10472

Source: Peiman Shahbeigi and Sina Shahbazmohamadi, Biomedical Engineering Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut

Nanoparticles have been increasingly used research towards targeted drug delivery and controlled drug release. While most of these particles have been developed as polymeric or liposomal particles because of their biocompatibility, there is a trend in current research toward the use of metallic and magnetic nanoparticles. These metallic nanoparticles were originally used as a contrast agent in imaging, but recent advances have shown how important they could be in drug and gene delivery and in therapeutics. Gold, silver, and paramagnetic nanoparticles have the greatest share in research being done. They have been shown to have good biocompatibility and certain varieties of magnetic nanoparticles have already been developed and distributed as therapeutic targeted drugs.   These heavy elements are typically imaged for research using fluorescence to evaluate delivery and distribution, but their atomic weights are good qualifications for increased contrast in backscatter electron analysis using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which uses characteristic X-rays emitted upon electron beam interac


 Biomedical Engineering

CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Targeted Integration In Vivo Using a Homology-mediated End Joining-based Strategy

1Institute of Neuroscience, State Key Laboratory of Neuroscience, Key Laboratory of Primate Neurobiology, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3School of Life Science and Technology, Shanghai Tech University, 4Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences

JoVE 56844


 Genetics

A Novel Surgical Approach for Intratracheal Administration of Bioactive Agents in a Fetal Mouse Model

1Molecular Virology and Gene Therapy, KU Leuven, 2Department of Woman and Child, KU Leuven, 3Neurobiology and Gene Therapy, KU Leuven, 4Division of Nuclear Medicine, KU Leuven, 5Biomedical NMR Unit/ MoSAIC, KU Leuven

JoVE 4219


 Medicine

Genome-wide RNAi Screening to Identify Host Factors That Modulate Oncolytic Virus Therapy

1Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute, 2Department of Biology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, 3Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, 4Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

JoVE 56913


 Cancer Research

CRISPR Guide RNA Cloning for Mammalian Systems

1Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University, 2Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 3Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 4Institute for Medical Engineering & Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 5Synthetic Biology Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 6Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 7Broad Institute

JoVE 57998


 Genetics

Preparation and In Vitro Characterization of Magnetized miR-modified Endothelial Cells

1Reference and Translation Center for Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy (RTC), Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Rostock, 2Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 3Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, 4Electron Microscopy Center, University of Rostock

JoVE 55567


 Medicine

CRISPR-Mediated Reorganization of Chromatin Loop Structure

1Department of Dermatology, Program in Epithelial Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 2Program in Cancer Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 3Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection, Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 4Department of Biology, Bridgewater State University, 5System Biosciences, 6Veterans Affairs Healthcare System

JoVE 57457


 Genetics

CRISPR-mediated Loss of Function Analysis in Cerebellar Granule Cells Using In Utero Electroporation-based Gene Transfer

1Division of Molecular Neurogenetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), DKFZ-ZMBH Alliance, 2Division of Molecular Genetics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), 3Hopp-Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ), 4Division of Pediatric Neurooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), 5Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital

JoVE 57311


 Developmental Biology

12345678920
More Results...