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 JoVE Developmental Biology

Rearing the Fruit Fly Drosophila melanogaster Under Axenic and Gnotobiotic Conditions

1Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Brigham Young University, 2Department of Entomology, Cornell University, 3Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, 4Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 5Biological Sciences, SUNY Oswego


JoVE 54219

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Isolation of Fecal Bacteria from Water Samples by Filtration

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

The quality of water destined for use in agricultural, recreational, and domestic settings is of great importance due to the potential for outbreaks of waterborne disease. Microbial agents implicated in such events include parasites, bacteria, and viruses that are shed in high numbers in the feces of infected people and animals. Transmission to new and susceptible hosts may then occur via the fecal-oral route upon ingestion of contaminated water. Therefore, the ability to monitor water sources for the presence of pathogenic microorganisms is significant in order to ensure public health. Due to the sheer number and variety of potential fecal-oral pathogens that may be present in water and their variable concentrations, it is impractical and expensive to assay directly for each one of them on a regular basis. Therefore, the microbiological assays for water quality monitoring employ coliform indicator bacteria. Coliforms comprise, in part, the normal intestinal microflora of warm-blooded mammals, are non-pathogenic, and are consistently excreted in the feces. Therefore, the detection of coliform bacteria in water means that a fecal release occurred, and that harmful pathogenic m

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

A New Method for Qualitative Multi-scale Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on Filamentous Fungal Colonies Using Confocal and Electron Microscopy

1Interactions Arbres – Microorganismes, UMR1136, INRA Université de Lorraine, 2Ecologie et Ecophysiologie Forestières - PTEF, UMR 1137, INRA Université de Lorraine, 3Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory


JoVE 54771

 JoVE Environment

Ecotoxicological Method with Marine Bacteria Vibrio anguillarum to Evaluate the Acute Toxicity of Environmental Contaminants

1Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Rome (Italy), 2Department of Biology, Tor Vergata University, Rome (Italy), 3Department of Biology and Evolution of Marine Organisms, Stazione Zoologica, Anton Dohrn, Naples (Italy)


JoVE 55211

 JoVE Genetics

Genetic Manipulation of the Plant Pathogen Ustilago maydis to Study Fungal Biology and Plant Microbe Interactions

1Institute for Microbiology, Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf, 2Bioeconomy Science Center (BioSC), 3Department of Genetics, Institute of Applied Biosciences, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 4Cluster of Excellence in Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Heinrich-Heine University Düsseldorf


JoVE 54522

 JoVE In-Press

Production of Chemicals by Klebsiella pneumoniae Using Bamboo Hydrolysate as Feedstock

1Lab of Biorefinery, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3Biorefinery Research Center, Jeonbuk Branch Institute, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology (KRIBB), 4School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University

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JoVE 55828

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Aseptic Technique in Environmental Science

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Luisa Ikner

Aseptic technique is a fundamental skill widely practiced in the field of environmental microbiology that requires a balance of mindfulness and practice in the laboratory. Proper use of this technique reduces the likelihood of bacterial or fungal contamination of reagents, culture media, and environmental samples. Aseptic technique is also vital to ensure data integrity and maintain the purity of culture libraries that may be comprised of very rare and difficult to culture isolates. Sources of contamination in the laboratory environment include airborne microorganisms (including those adhering to dust and lint particles), microbes present on the laboratory bench workspace or on unsterilized glassware or equipment, and microbes transferred from the body and hair of the researcher. The use of aseptic technique is also a safety measure that lowers the potential for the transmission of microorganisms to researchers, which is particularly important when working with pathogens.

 JoVE Immunology and Infection

Imaging InlC Secretion to Investigate Cellular Infection by the Bacterial Pathogen Listeria monocytogenes

1Unité des Interactions Bactéries Cellules, Pasteur Institute, 2INSERM U604, 3Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), USC2020, 4Institute of Biochemistry, ETH Zürich, 5Focal Area Infection Biology, Biozentrum, University of Basel


JoVE 51043

 Science Education: Essentials of Environmental Microbiology

Detecting Environmental Microorganisms with the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Gel Electrophoresis

JoVE Science Education

Source: Laboratories of Dr. Ian Pepper and Dr. Charles Gerba - Arizona University
Demonstrating Author: Bradley Schmitz

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a technique used to detect microorganisms that are present in soil, water, and atmospheric environments. By amplifying specific sections of DNA, PCR can facilitate the detection and identification of target microorganisms down to the species, strain, and serovar/pathovar level. The technique can also be utilized to characterize entire communities of microorganisms in samples. The culturing of microorganisms in the laboratory using specialized growth media is a long-established technique and remains in use for the detection of microorganisms in environmental samples. Many microbes in the natural environment, while alive, maintain low levels of metabolic activity and/or doubling times and are thus referred to as viable but non-culturable (VBNC) organisms. The use of culture-based techniques alone cannot detect these microbes and, therefore, does not provide a thorough assessment of microbial populations in samples. The use of PCR allows for the detection of culturable microbes, VBNC organisms, and those that are no longer alive or active, as the amplification of genetic sequences does not generally require the pre-enrichment of microorga

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