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Protective Clothing: Clothing designed to protect the individual against possible exposure to known hazards.

The Hawaii Protocol for Scientific Monitoring of Coffee Berry Borer: a Model for Coffee Agroecosystems Worldwide

1Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, 2Daniel K. Inouye US Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, 3College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 4Independent Consultant on CBB Management

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57204


 JoVE In-Press

Safe Handling of Mineral Acids

JoVE 10370

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima A. Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

A mineral acid (or inorganic acid) is defined as a water-soluble acid derived from inorganic minerals by chemical reaction as opposed to organic acids (e.g. acetic acid, formic acid). Examples of mineral acids include: • Boric acid (CAS No.10043-35-3) • Chromic acid (CAS No.1333-82-0) • Hydrochloric acid (CAS No.7647-01-0) • Hydrofluoric acid (CAS No. 7664-39-3) • Nitric acid (CAS No. 7697-37-2) • Perchloric acid (CAS No. 7601-90-3) • Phosphoric acid (CAS No.7664-38-2) • Sulfuric acid (CAS No.7664-93-9) Mineral acids are commonly found in research laboratories and their corrosive nature makes them a significant safety risk. Since they are important reagents in the research laboratory and often do not have substitutes, it is important that they are handled properly and with care. Some acids are even shock sensitive and under certain conditions may cause explosions (i.e., salts of perchloric acid).


 Lab Safety

Emergency Eyewash and Shower Stations

JoVE 10373

Robert M. Rioux, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mandates that an emergency eyewash and shower station be easily accessible in all workplaces in which a person could be exposed to injurious and/or corrosive substances. Emergency eyewash and shower stations should be used in the case of a laboratory or workplace accident that involves the spilling of a harmful, possibly corrosive chemical onto the body or the splashing of such a chemical into the eyes. Eyewash and shower stations are not, however, a replacement for proper protective equipment (PPE), including laboratory coats and protective eyewear, which should always be worn when handling hazardous chemicals. For proper selection of PPE, refer to your organization's Environmental Health & Safety (EHS) office.


 Lab Safety

Assessment of the Cytotoxic and Immunomodulatory Effects of Substances in Human Precision-Cut Lung Slices

1Fraunhofer Institute for Toxicology and Experimental Medicine, Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH), 2Institute for Pathology, Hannover Medical School, Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH), 3Division of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Klinikum Region Hannover (KRH), 4Department of Cardiothoracic, Transplantation and Vascular Surgery (HTTG), Hannover Medical School, Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH), 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, RWTH Aachen University, 6Institute for Immunology, Hannover Medical School, Biomedical Research in Endstage and Obstructive Lung Disease Hannover (BREATH)

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 57042


 JoVE In-Press

Functionalization and Dispersion of Carbon Nanomaterials Using an Environmentally Friendly Ultrasonicated Ozonolysis Process

1Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Group, 2Maritime Division, Defence Science and Technology Group, 3Department of Chemistry and Physics, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, 4Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, 5Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, 6Center for Composite Materials, University of Delaware

JoVE 55614


 Environment

Handling Chemical Spills

JoVE 10371

Source: Robert M. Rioux & Taslima Zaman, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Since chemicals are commonly used for laboratory research purposes, it is extremely important to be adequately prepared to handle chemical spills or accidental release of hazardous chemicals, which can happen at any time. No matter how minor a spill may be, the inability to respond in an emergency situation could severely endanger public health or the environment. All chemical spills must be properly disposed of, satisfying diverse regulations and standards, such as those of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Act of 1986, which are administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).


 Lab Safety

Study of Viral Vectors in a Three-dimensional Liver Model Repopulated with the Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

1Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Biotechnology, Berlin University of Technology, 2Department of Medical Biotechnology, Institute of Biotechnology, Berlin University of Technology, 3Department of Bioprocess Engineering, Institute of Biotechnology, Berlin University of Technology

JoVE 54633


 Cancer Research

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