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Synovial Fluid: The clear, viscous fluid secreted by the Synovial membrane. It contains mucin, albumin, fat, and mineral salts and serves to lubricate joints.

Magnetic-Activated Cell Sorting Strategies to Isolate and Purify Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from a Rabbit Model

1Postgraduate institution, Guangzhou Medical University, 2Guangdong Provincial Research Center for Artificial Intelligence and Digital Orthopedic Technology, 3Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Shenzhen Laboratory of Digital Orthopaedic Engineering, Shenzhen Second People's Hospital (The First Hospital Affiliated to Shenzhen University), 4Department of Chemistry, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center

JoVE 57466

 Biology

Joints

JoVE 10865

Joints, also called articulations or articular surfaces, are points at which ligaments or other tissues connect adjacent bones. Joints permit movement and stability, and can be classified based on their structure or function.

Structural joint classifications are based on the material that makes up the joint as well as whether or not the joint contains a space between the bones. Joints are structurally classified as fibrous, cartilaginous, or synovial. The bones of a fibrous joint are connected by fibrous tissue and have no space, or cavity, between them. Thus, fibrous joints cannot move. Although the skull appears to be a single large bone, it includes several bones that are connected by fibrous joints called sutures. Syndesmoses, the second type of fibrous joint found in the fibula (calf bone), allow more movement than sutures. The third type of fibrous joint, gomphoses, connect teeth to their sockets. The bones of cartilaginous joints are connected by cartilage and permit minimal movement. The two types of cartilaginous joints, synchondroses and symphyses, differ in the kind of cartilage that connects the bones (hyaline cartilage and fibrocartilage, respectively). The epiphyseal plates in the bones of growing children contain synchondroses. Symphyses connect vertebrae as well as the pubic bones. Synovial joints, found in the elbows

 Core: Musculoskeletal System

Novel Diagnostics in Revision Arthroplasty: Implant Sonication and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

1Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, University Hospital Bonn, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Bonn, 3Division of EU Cooperation/Microbiology, Paul-Ehrlich-Institute

JoVE 55147

 Medicine

A Novel in vivo Gene Transfer Technique and in vitro Cell Based Assays for the Study of Bone Loss in Musculoskeletal Disorders

1Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, University of California, Davis, 2Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California, 3Department of Dermatology, University of California, Davis

JoVE 51810

 Medicine

Surgical Retrieval, Isolation and In vitro Expansion of Human Anterior Cruciate Ligament-derived Cells for Tissue Engineering Applications

1Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology & Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 2Division of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Department of Surgery, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 3Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Program, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 4University of Illinois at Springfield

JoVE 51597

 Bioengineering
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