Show Advanced Search

REFINE YOUR SEARCH:

Containing Text
- - -
+
Filter by author or institution
GO
Filter by publication date
From:
October, 2006
Until:
Today
Filter by journal section

Filter by science education

 
 
Major Histocompatibility Complex: The genetic region which contains the loci of genes which determine the structure of the serologically defined (Sd) and lymphocyte-defined (Ld) Transplantation antigens, genes which control the structure of the Immune response-associated antigens, Human; the Immune response genes which control the ability of an animal to respond immunologically to antigenic stimuli, and genes which determine the structure and/or level of the first four components of complement.

In Situ Detection of Autoreactive CD4 T Cells in Brain and Heart Using Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Dextramers

1School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 2Center for Biotechnology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, 3Nebraska Center for Virology and School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln

JoVE 51679

 Immunology and Infection

Cell-mediated Immune Responses

JoVE 10896

The cell-mediated immune system is the host’s primary response against invasive bacteria and viruses that cause intracellular infections. It is also essential for fighting against and destroying cancer cells. Furthermore, the cell-mediated immune system plays a role in the rejection of organ transplants or graft tissue.

Phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are the first to recognize a foreign particle. These cells engulf the foreign particle and digest it. Small molecules of the foreign particle, called antigens, remain intact and are presented at the surface of the phagocytic cell. The presentation is facilitated by proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which binds the antigen and protrude from the cell. The phagocytic cell is therefore also called an antigen presenting cell (APC). The MHC-antigen complex activates cells of the adaptive immune system, which eventually fight the source of the foreign particle. T cells are a type of lymphocyte that are named after their location of maturation—the thymus. In the thymus, precursor T cells differentiate into two main types, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These cell types are named after the surface receptor that determines the cell’s function. All T cells carry T-cell receptors, but the coreceptor CD4

 Core: Immune System

Vaccinations

JoVE 10903

Vaccination is the administration of antigenic material from pathogens to confer immunity against a specific microorganism. Vaccination primes the immune system to recognize and mount an immune response faster and more effectively if the real pathogen is encountered. Vaccinations are one of the most efficient ways to protect both individual humans and the general public from disease. A growing anti-vaccination skepticism risks the successes of vaccination programs that helped reduce and, in some instances, eradicate fatal diseases. Vaccines can be administered via oral and intranasal routes, as well as by injection into the muscle (intramuscular), the fat layer under the skin (subcutaneous), or the skin (intradermal). Vaccines contain antigens derived from a specific pathogen. Those containing “dead” antigens, which are intact but unable to replicate, are referred to as inactive vaccines. By contrast, subunit vaccines contain only parts of the pathogen. Some vaccines contain the live pathogen in a weakened (attenuated) form. An attenuated pathogen stimulates the immune system without causing severe disease. Vaccines often contain adjuvants, chemicals that enhance the immune response against the pathogen. When a vaccine is administered, antigen-presenting immune cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells or macrophages, engulf the antigen from the v

 Core: Immune System

Hardy-Weinberg & Genetic Drift- Concept

JoVE 10559

Evolutionary change is interesting and important to study, but changes in populations occur over long periods of time and in huge physical spaces and are therefore very difficult to measure. In general, studying phenomena like this requires the use of mathematical models which are built using parameters that can be conveniently measured. These models are then used to make predictions about how …

 Lab Bio

An Introduction to the Laboratory Mouse: Mus musculus

JoVE 5129

Mice (Mus musculus) are an important research tool for modeling human disease progression and development in the lab. Despite differences in their size and appearance, mice share a distinct genetic similarity to humans, and their ability to reproduce and mature quickly make them efficient and economical candidate mammals for scientific study.


This video provides a brief…

 Biology II

Personalized Peptide Arrays for Detection of HLA Alloantibodies in Organ Transplantation

1Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, and the Center for Kidney Research and Therapeutics at the Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 2Surgery-Organ Transplantation, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 3School of Biological Sciences and Medical Engineering, Southeast University

JoVE 56278

 Biochemistry

Studying Organelle Dynamics in B Cells During Immune Synapse Formation

1Laboratory of Immune Cell Biology, Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 2Faculty of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 3Centro de Investigaciones en Biología Celular y Biomedicina, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad San Sebastián

JoVE 59621

 Immunology and Infection

Use of Single Chain MHC Technology to Investigate Co-agonism in Human CD8+ T Cell Activation

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2Immunology Programme, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, 3Emerging Infectious Diseases Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 4Singapore Immunology Network, A*STAR, 5NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), National University of Singapore, 6Department of Immunology, Wright-Fleming Institute, Imperial College London

JoVE 59126

 Immunology and Infection

Comprehensive Autopsy Program for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

1Department of Neurosciences, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, 3Mellen Center for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic

JoVE 59511

 Neuroscience

Identification of Intracellular Signaling Events Induced in Viable Cells by Interaction with Neighboring Cells Undergoing Apoptotic Cell Death

1Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 2Section of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Jesse Brown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3Department of Biology, Kutztown University of Pennsylvania, 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 5Department of Microbiology & Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago

JoVE 54980

 Biology

Measurement of T Cell Alloreactivity Using Imaging Flow Cytometry

1Division of Respirology, Departments of Medicine and Immunology, Toronto Lung Transplant Program, Multiorgan Transplant Program, Toronto General Research Institute, University of Toronto and University Health Network, 2Latner Thoracic Surgery Laboratories, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, 3National Institutes of Health Research, Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, Translational Immunology Laboratory, NDORMS, Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford, 4Transplantation Research Immunology Group, Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford

JoVE 55283

 Immunology and Infection

Evaluation of Zika Virus-specific T-cell Responses in Immunoprivileged Organs of Infected Ifnar1-/- Mice

1School of Laboratory Medicine and Life Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, 2NHC Key Laboratory of Medical Virology and Viral Diseases, National Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 3State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, 4Research Network of Immunity and Health (RNIH), Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 5Laboratory Animal Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 6CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

JoVE 58110

 Immunology and Infection

Identification of Mediators of T-cell Receptor Signaling via the Screening of Chemical Inhibitor Libraries

1Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 2Singapore Immunology Network, A*STAR, 3Curiox Biosystems, 4Department of Immunobiology, Rega Institute for Medical Research, Katholieke Universiteit (KU) Leuven

JoVE 58946

 Immunology and Infection

An In Vivo Mouse Model to Measure Naïve CD4 T Cell Activation, Proliferation and Th1 Differentiation Induced by Bone Marrow-derived Dendritic Cells

1LamImSys Lab, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), 2LamImSys Lab, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Hospital 12 de Octubre (imas12), 3CIBER de Enfermedades Cardiovasculares

JoVE 58118

 Immunology and Infection

Isolation and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Preterm and Term Infants

1Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Pathology, Kobe Children's Hospital, 3Department of Pediatrics, Hyogo College of Medicine, 4Department of Developmental Pediatrics, Shizuoka Children's Hospital, 5Department of Pediatrics, Nihon University School of Medicine

JoVE 58806

 Developmental Biology

qKAT: Quantitative Semi-automated Typing of Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor Genes

1Department of Pathology, University of Cambridge, 2Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Cambridge School of Medicine, NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, 4Centre for Trophoblast Research, University of Cambridge, 5Department of Genetics & Evolution, University of Geneva, 6Royal Papworth Hospital, 7Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge

JoVE 58646

 Genetics
123
More Results...