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Magnetic Fields: Areas of attractive or repulsive force surrounding Magnets.

Magnetic Fields

JoVE 10384

Source: Yong P. Chen, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, College of Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Magnetic fields can be generated by moving charges, such as an electrical current. The magnetic field generated by a current can be calculated from the Maxwell equation. In addition, magnetic objects such as bar magnets can also generate magnetic fields due to microscopic dynamics of charges inside the material. Magnetic fields will exert magnetic force on other moving charges or magnetic objects, with the force proportional to the magnetic field. Magnetic fields are fundamental to electromagnetism and underlie many practical applications ranging from compasses to magnetic resonance imaging. This experiment will demonstrate magnetic fields produced by a permanent bar magnet as well as an electrical current, using small compass needle magnets that align with magnetic fields. This experiment will also demonstrate the force exerted by the magnetic fields produced by a current on another current-carrying wire.


 Physics II

Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Skeletal Muscle Disease

1Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 2Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, 4Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vanderbilt University, 6Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University

JoVE 52352


 Medicine

Electric Charge in a Magnetic Field

JoVE 10133

Source: Andrew Duffy, PhD, Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, MA

This experiment duplicates J.J. Thomson's famous experiment at the end of the 19th century, in which he measured the charge-to-mass ratio of the electron. In combination with Robert A. Millikan's oil-drop experiment a few years later that produced a value for the charge of the electron, the experiments enabled scientists to find, for the first time, both the mass and the charge of the electron, which are key parameters for the electron. Thomson was not able to measure the electron charge or the electron mass separately, but he was able to find their ratio. The same is true for this demonstration; although here there is the advantage of being able to look up the values for the magnitude of the charge on the electron(e) and the mass of the electron (me), which are now both known precisely.


 Physics II

Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

1Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, 2Division of Engineering, Mayo Clinic, 3School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health, Durham University, 4Regional Center for Applied Molecular Oncology, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 5Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic

JoVE 53099


 Bioengineering

Preparation and In Vitro Characterization of Magnetized miR-modified Endothelial Cells

1Reference and Translation Center for Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy (RTC), Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Rostock, 2Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 3Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, 4Electron Microscopy Center, University of Rostock

JoVE 55567


 Medicine

Interictal High Frequency Oscillations Detected with Simultaneous Magnetoencephalography and Electroencephalography as Biomarker of Pediatric Epilepsy

1Fetal-Neonatal Neuroimaging and Developmental Science Center, Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 2Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3Division of Epilepsy Surgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 4Division of Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

JoVE 54883


 Medicine

Inductance

JoVE 10303

Source: Yong P. Chen, PhD, Department of Physics & Astronomy, College of Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

This experiment will use inductive coils to demonstrate the concept of inductor and inductance. Magnetic induction will be demonstrated using a rod magnet inserted into or extracted away from the core of a coil to induce a transient electromotive force (emf) voltage in the coil, measured by a voltmeter. This experiment will also demonstrate the mutual inductance between two coils, where turning on or off a current flowing in a coil can induce an emf voltage in a second coil nearby. Finally, the experiment will demonstrate the self-inductance of a coil, when switching a current off induces an emf to light up a light bulb connected in parallel with the coil.


 Physics II

A Novel Stretching Platform for Applications in Cell and Tissue Mechanobiology

1Centre for Interdisciplinary NanoPhysics, Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 2University of Ottawa Heart Institue, University of Ottawa, 3Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, 4Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, 5Institute for Science, Society and Policy, University of Ottawa

JoVE 51454


 Bioengineering

A Multimodal Imaging- and Stimulation-based Method of Evaluating Connectivity-related Brain Excitability in Patients with Epilepsy

1Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, 2Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 3Berenson-Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 4Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 5Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital

JoVE 53727


 Medicine

The Use of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy as a Tool for the Measurement of Bi-hemispheric Transcranial Electric Stimulation Effects on Primary Motor Cortex Metabolism

1Department of Psychology, University of Montréal, 2Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, 3Center for Magnetic Resonance Research and Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota

JoVE 51631


 Neuroscience

Conditional Knockdown of Gene Expression in Cancer Cell Lines to Study the Recruitment of Monocytes/Macrophages to the Tumor Microenvironment

1Division of Hematology, Oncology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, 2The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital, 3Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of Southern California

Video Coming Soon

JoVE 56333


 JoVE In-Press

Fabrication of a Functionalized Magnetic Bacterial Nanocellulose with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

1Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4Program of Study and Control of Tropical Diseases (PECET), University of Antioquia, 5Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, 6WHO Collaborating Center for Vaccine Research, Evaluation and Training on Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Texas Medical Branch, 7Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

JoVE 52951


 Bioengineering

Using a pH Meter

JoVE 5500

Source: Laboratory of Dr. Zhongqi He - United States Department of Agriculture

Acids and bases are substances capable of donating protons (H+) and hydroxide ions (OH-), respectively. They are two extremes that describe chemicals. Mixing acids and bases can cancel out or neutralize their extreme effects. A substance that is neither acidic nor basic is neutral. The values of proton concentration ([H+]) for most solutions are inconveniently small and difficult to compare so that a more practical quantity, pH, has been introduced. pH was originally defined as the decimal logarithm of the reciprocal of the molar concentration of protons , but was updated to the decimal logarithm of the reciprocal of the hydrogen ion activity . The former definition is now occasionally expressed as p[H]. The difference between p[H] and pH is quite small. It has been stated that pH = p[H] + 0.04. It is common practice to use the term 'pH' for both types of measurements. The pH scale typically ranges from 0 to 14. For a 1 M solution of a strong acid, pH=0 and for a 1 M solution of a strong base, pH=14. Thus, measured pH values will lie mostly in the rang


 General Chemistry

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